Books in print & books in brief


Author: Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Hot Lights, Cold Steel: Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon’s First Years, Michael J. Collins, M.D., ’71 (St. Martin’s Press). A fast-paced memoir of the fear, heartbreak, humor and triumph of the author’s four-year residency in orthopedic surgery. Can that young boy’s leg be saved? How do you tell a woman she has widespread cancer? And when do you stop being bone tired? “We were learning that all the training and all the caring in the world were not going to solve every problem,” Collins writes. What he also learns is the role he truly plays as a doctor, a role in which compassion is integral to the treatment.

Commander of All Lincoln’s Armies: A Life of General Henry W. Halleck, John F. Marszalek ’63M.A., ’68Ph.D. (Harvard University Press). The general known for his failure in leading the Union troops from 1862 to 1864 as Lincoln’s chief war adviser comes under the microscope in this biography. Halleck’s early achievements ranged from his service in Mexican War battles to his writing on military theory to his highly regarded work as a lawyer and as an entrepreneur. While these successes earned Halleck an early reputation as a man of action, the author analyzes what he sees as the psychological traits that led to Halleck’s inability to make important wartime decisions.

Cast of Shadows, Kevin Guilfoile ’90 (Knopf). In this philosophical thriller set in the near future, a fertility doctor grieves over the murder of his daughter. When he acquires DNA found at the scene, he decides to clone the unknown man who beat and strangled his daughter. The distraught father hopes one day to look into the face of the genetic replica of the killer and try to understand what drove him to his vicious act. The unsettling plot gives rise to questions of free will and evil, nature and nurture, science and religion.

How to Save for College, Joseph Russo and Jim Belvin (Random House/Princeton Review). Russo, director of student financial services at Notre Dame, and Belvin, director of financial aid at Duke University, offer advice on investments, prepayment plans, education tax benefits, loans and other topics. From “Determining Financial Need” to “Okay, So We Didn’t Save Enough. Now What?” the chapters guide parents through saving strategies. The book offers detailed information on government programs, including the 529 savings plan, and educational loans.

Hard Sell: The Evolution of a Viagra Salesman, Jamie Reidy ’92 (Andrews McMeel Publishing). The self-proclaimed slacker, who spent four years in pharmaceutical sales, here serves up a stimulating dose of the legal business of selling drugs. The methods drug reps use to promote their products can vary from quixotic to informative, the author reveals as he takes readers behind the scenes in this comedic and at times X-rated expose.


A Man for All Generations: Life’s Lessons from Fr. Ted Hesburgh, CSC, DVD produced by the Notre Dame Alumni Association (New Group Media)_. In this 30-minute film, Father Hesburgh, Notre Dame president emeritus, shares his reflections on such topics as tolerance, fear, honesty, coping with loss, prayer and facing death. Available in DVD and VHS format. For more information visit

Books in brief:

The Biblical Truth about America’s Death Penalty, Dale S. Recinella ’76J.D. (Northeastern University Press). Does the Bible support capital punishment? The author analyzes scripture and looks at how the death penalty functions today.

Runaway Eating: The 8-Point Plan to Conquer Adult Food and Weight Obsessions, Cynthia M. Bulik ’82 and Nadine Taylor (Rodale). The authors discuss eating problems developed by women in midlife and present a patient-tested plan for breaking free of diet and weight obsessions.

John F. Kennedy: A Biography, Michael O’Brien ’65 (Thomas Dunne Books). A new consideration of the popular president’s strengths and shortcomings. Includes 16 pages of photos.

Shipshewana: An Indiana Amish Community, Dorothy O. Pratt ’95M.A., ’97Ph.D. (Quarry Books). A cultural history of the third-largest settlement of Old Order Amish in the world and how they remain “a people apart.” The author is assistant dean for the ND College of Arts and Letters.

Golden Boy, Paul Hornung ’57, as told to William F. Reed (Simon & Schuster). “My life was all about games, girls, gambling and gin joints,” and here the Heisman winner takes readers behind the scenes of that life.

Conversations with Audre Lorde, edited by Joan Wylie Hall ’70M.A., ’76Ph.D. (University Press of Mississippi). This gathering of 21 interviews with the African-American writer and activist reveals the many sides of a critic of injustice.

The Encyclopedia of African American Military History, William Weir ’50 (Prometheus Books). More than 300 entries highlight the military service of African Americans from the Revolutionary War to the present.

Earth-Friendly: Re-Visioning Science and Spirituality through Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, and Rudolf Steiner, Adrian M. Hofstetter, O.P., ’52M.A., ’56Ph.D. (Lindisfarne Books). A collection of essays exploring the interplay of science and the sacred.

Separatist Christianity: Spirit and Matter in the Early Church Fathers, David A. Lopez ’93 (Johns Hopkins University Press). A view of the relationship between early Christians and the Roman empire.

The Four Winners: The Head, The Hands, The Foot, The Ball, Knute Rockne ’14 (Once-and-Future Books). A re-issue of the famed football coach’s only novel. Originally published in 1925 for a young adult audience, the story follows the challenges that beset a young football player.

Tough Choices: Bringing Moral Issues Home, Sean Lynch ‘98, ’00M.Ed., and Brian O’Brien ’00M.Ed. (Ave Maria Press). An educational resource designed for use in Catholic schools or youth programs. A general overview of issues is followed by several “moral dilemma” scenarios and questions that teens can discuss with their parents and the class.

Faith and Fortune: The Quiet Revolution to Reform American Business, Marc Gunther (Crown Business). The stories of corporations that believe “doing good is good business.” Father Oliver F. Williams, CSC, ’61, ’69M.A., a Notre Dame management professor, is among those interviewed.

The Last Slider, Peter K. Connolly (Trafford Publishing). The launch of a nuclear submarine provides the background to this novel of suspense. The author attended Notre Dame in the 1950s.

Just Deserts, Ralph Wright ’50 (Xlibris). In this novel of lies and deception, love and second chances, a college fund-raiser faces mounting personal and professional problems.

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