Molarity Classic: 216-220

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Author: Michael Molinelli '82

Back to the days of Dan Devine…

Strip 216

216. As ND Football fans we are quick to criticize average players even though we could not ever hope to be on the field. So I saw Mitch as the everyman — the high school star who just could not hack it with the college elite. Coincidentally, the headlining sports story on the back of this Observer talked about ND Quarterback Russell John “Rusty” Lisch having his best game ever — completing 10 of 14 passes for 227 yards. He had two touchdown passes and a 75-yard bomb to Tony Hunter. Rusty struggled with maintaining starting status especially when Joe Montana came on the scene. The article also chided Devine for keeping Vagas Ferguson out during the second half so we would not run up the score beyond the 38–13 victory over Air Force. Ferguson was only 21 yards away from being the all-time Irish rusher. (Poor Dan is always the goat.)

Strip 217

217. Lisa Chavez was one of the Notre Dame cheerleaders. If I was smart I might have parlayed this cartoon into a peck on the cheek or a date. But I ran this when I was in Rome and Lisa was back in South Bend.

Strip 218

218. An article in this Observer reported that 15 students went to the Student Health Services (pronounce “infirmary”) for a stomach disorder. Tests were being conducted in the dining halls on some of the food. I could not find a follow-up article about the test results. But the JELL-O mold seen crossing the South Quad around midnight should have been a clue.

Strip 219

219. An article on the editorial page featured an article from a reader supporting the priesthood admitting women.

Strip 220

220. So even though Cheryl dated Jim at first. Mitch took advantage of Jim’s year in Rome to go out with Cheryl.


See the first five classic strips. Check back monthly for more classic Molarity strips. Molarity Redux, the updated, continuing adventures of Jim Mole and friends, also is posted monthly. For those new strips, check out the cartoon archives.


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