Molarity Classic: 319-323


Author: Michael Molinelli '82

Rejection, self-incrimination, sidelong glances, collectibles. It’s just another ride on the Molarity time machine.


319. The cover story of The Observer headlined the NCAA pulling the plug on WNDU broadcasting the football games locally. At this point, the NCAA allowed only one nationally broadcast game from a home stadium each season, but WNDU had been broadcasting locally for 25 years. The suit was brought by cable companies who said somehow saw the local broadcasts as competition.


320. Culling from The Observer some national topics in these the final months before the Carter – Reagan – Anderson election: the recession, Iran’s belligerence, and using our country’s resources on our people instead of refugees elsewhere.


321. Mitch continues to be confused how to relate his fondness for Cheryl with his male views.


322. In response to the NCAA ban, the University set up to broadcast the upcoming home game against Michigan at Stepan Center. They couldn’t use the ACC because of the Friday and Saturday concerts with Poco and Anne Murray, respectively. A letter in The Observer from Dan Devine thanked “the greatest student body in the world” for a “super fantastic” pep rally prior to the Purdue game.


323. The day after this cartoon, Harry Oliver kicked his famous 51-yard field goal against Michigan. A few days after that an Observer sports writer, featured an article about a fan who took turf off the field from the location that Harry kicked the ball – for his ND famous game turf collection. He also shouted out, “Molarity take note.” Was it “life imitating art,” or “truth is stranger than fiction”? I cannot say. There was also feature article about “The Man Behind ‘Molarity,’” which naturally ran with the “come lay with me you feisty wench” cartoon.

See the first five classic strips. Check back monthly for more classic Molarity strips. Molarity Redux, the updated, continuing adventures of Jim Mole and friends, also is posted monthly. For those new strips, check out the cartoon archives.

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