News » Archives » March 2004

The Old Gang

By Steve Myers '97

One of my college buddies has a photo documenting a top-secret mission during my freshman year at Notre Dame. Three of us, all residents of Alumni Hall, are kneeling in front of Dillon Hall next to a 3-foot-tall pyramid of industrial-sized toilet rolls —the bounty of a late-night operation in Dillon, Alumni’s rival.…

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The Dating Game

By Paige Smoron Wiser '92

I honestly can’t think of any advice my mom gave me about dating. She’d pretty much let me muddle my way through, with an eyebrow raised here or there. That is, until I’d bring home a guy she really couldn’t stand. Then she’d let me know about it.

I remember one year when she took a photo of me with my high school homecoming date. The spot where he was standing was obscured by a mysterious black bar of undeveloped film, as if God—or Mr. Kodak himself—didn’t approve, either.…

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The Price of Success

By Kate Wiltrout '95

During the saddest winter of my life, Tuesday nights were the closest I ever got to happy.

It was late 1998, and I was living temporarily with my parents, depression slowly strangling my existence.
I’d graduated three years earlier and had been working as a journalist. But when I returned to the States after two years overseas, the life I’d known began slipping away.…

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Life in the City

By Christina Conklin '88

A few months ago I attempted to pick up an altered dress at my dry cleaners in Manhattan. When I walked in, the owner was hemming a pair of pants, and my dress was in the “to do” basket. This was the third time he’d missed a deadline, and I exploded like a fed-up spouse: “Why do you always do this to me!” I shouted, “If it wasn’t going to be done on Saturday, you should have called me! I have to wear that tonight!” Another customer in the tiny shop (Pants Man, presumably, waiting for his hem job) ignored me until the dry cleaner picked up the dress and asked me exactly what time I was going out. Pants Man tensed, about to object. I told the cleaner to forget it and stormed out.…

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A note on the winter 2003¬04 contents

By Kerry Temple ’74

A funny thing happens on the way to growing up — a lot of years go by. One day you’re walking around the lakes, trying to figure out how you’ll fit into the real world, and the next thing you know you’ve got kids of your own facing the same dilemma. In between is a blur of living—dating, marriage and children, careers, housekeeping and all manner of callings, demands and responsibilities. So pretty soon, instead of trying to figure out how you’ll fit into the real world, you realize you already have.…

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Career Moves

By Mary Beth Ellis

When I attended graduate school in Vermont, I trailed around campus in an almost constant state of irritation, because I was in Vermont. There is little else to do there (no baseball, no sweating, no cutting of taxes or trees) except to be irritated and perhaps graduate, which I did, stupidly.

Now I want to go back to Vermont.…

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Notre Dame Way Back When

By Jerome Ledvina '38

When I returned home after my 10 hours of work at my summer job in a cheese warehouse in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, I was overjoyed to read a letter from Notre Dame informing me that I had been accepted as a transfer student and was awarded a $200 working scholarship. Without that scholarship I wouldn’t have been able to go to Notre Dame. I was delighted when I could register as a junior student at Notre Dame in September 1936.…

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Bigger Than Winter: For Hugh E. Reilly '76

By Mickey Reilly

Thursday night
Sheraton Hotel, Chicago

Dear Hugh,

How is it possible, after a lifetime of friendship, that you have simply disappeared, my brother? I wander through my days searching for your grin, the way you cock your head when listening, the quality of your voice as singular as the swirls in your fingertips. I see your son, your wife, our parents, our siblings, your friends, and I recognize the look in their eyes, too.…

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Real-life Work for Human Rights

By Richard Conklin '59M.A.

Barbara Frey, a 1978 Notre Dame graduate, has never owned or discharged a firearm, but she can confidently refer to “hand-held under-barrel and mounted grenade launchers” and is among the world’s leading experts on how small arms and light weapons impact international human rights.

The 47-year-old attorney is an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota and director of the human rights program in its Institute for Global Studies. In 2000 she became an alternate to the 26-member United Nations Sub-Commission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights. Thus began her education in such matters as heavy machine guns, recoilless rifles and mortars of calibers of less than 100mm.…

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Books in Print

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Jonathan Edwards: A Life, George M. Marsden (Yale University Press). The ND professor of history’s critically acclaimed biography of controversial Protestant theologian Edwards (1703-1758) casts light on his personal life and his theology. The author reveals Edwards’ struggles to reconcile his Puritan heritage with the secular world and his personal difficulties with his faith. Told in an easily read narrative style, the book views Edwards in the context of his time in colonial America, when the fiery preacher ignited the Great Awakening of the 18th century.…

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Books in Brief

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Who Do You Say That I Am? Confessing the Mystery of Christ, edited by John Cavadini and Laura Holt ’92M.A., ’99Ph.D. (Notre Dame Press). Essays focusing on the identity and ministry of Jesus written by scholars of Christianity, Judaism and Islam. Notre Dame contributors include Rabbi Michael Signer and theology professors Cavadini, David Burrell, CSC

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Santa Barbara County District Attorney* Thomas W. Sneddon Jr. ‘63* is the prosecutor who filed child molestation charges against pop singer Michael Jackson. . . . Brian Grunert ’92 won a Grammy in the category of Best Recording Package for his design work on Ani DiFranco’s compact disc Evolve_. . . . Eric Baumgartner ’88, ’93Ph.D.

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Alumni Briefs

By Notre Dame Alumni Association

Alumni Association Awards

The James F. Armstrong Award will be presented posthumously to Dennis K. Moore at the spring Alumni Senate on April 23 in recognition of his distinguished service to the University. Moore was named associate vice president of Notre Dame’s division of public affairs and communication in April 2002. Prior to that appointment, he had served as principal spokesperson for the University since 1990 as director of public relations and information. Moore brought his talents to the University in 1988 after 20 years in journalism and corporate public relations, including 10 years as a freelance writer in the United States and Ireland, and four years as executive editor of The Kiwanis Magazine,

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Doing What I Love

By Barbara J. Mangione

“Find the job you would do for free and then get someone to pay you to do it.”

This is the advice I give to students at freshman orientation, in mentoring programs, in beginning language classes. It’s the philosophy that makes the beginning of each semester so exciting, the end so satisfying. It’s part of what makes it so much fun to be a teacher. The real joy, though, comes from what the teacher learns, and these most important things are rarely those one reads in the small hours of the morning while preparing the next day’s classes.

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Trio Makes Music to Soothe the Soul

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Call them three guys who love music. Call them the liturgical trio. Or call them the instrumentalists with some popular CDs to their name.

Except their group doesn’t have a name. And that’s fine with them. The trio is made up of Michael James ’84, violin and mandolin; Craig Watz ’84, ’87J.D., acoustic bass; and Steve Warner ’80M.A., guitar, dulcimer and Celtic harp.

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Ora Jones Lights up Her Town

By Julie York Coppens

The queen. The caretaker. The police officer. The judge.

If she’s a figure of authority, chances are Ora Jones has played her on stage. The actor’s presence is so commanding that she’s often assigned roles historically filled by men—like the Stage Manager in Thornton Wilder’s Our Town, an American classic given an acclaimed staging last fall at the new Writers’ Theatre in Glencoe, Illinois.

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How to Deliver Bad News and Live to Tell About It

By John Monczunski

No one likes to deliver bad news. It’s especially difficult to deliver it to one’s boss. After all, they shoot messengers, don’t they? But now and then most of us have to tell someone something we’d rather not. In an organization it’s especially critical that those in charge have accurate, even if uncomfortable, information to solve a problem. So how do

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One Pollution Solution?

By John Monczunski

“Ionic liquid” may sound like a new brand of dish detergent. But it’s really an unexplored class of chemical compound with the potential to help clean the nation’s air while saving industry millions of dollars. At least that’s the hope. Whether it’s any more than that an interdisciplinary team of Notre Dame researchers intends to find out.…

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Stomaching Chemotherapy Now Getting Easier

By Ed Cohen

Imagine you’re an oncologist. You spot one of your patients at the mall. You stroll over to say hello.

He throws up at the sight of you.

This actually happens, says Rudy Navari, M.D., ’66, associate dean of the College of Science, director of the Walther Cancer Research Center at Notre Dame and a practicing oncologist himself.…

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Tales from the Crypts

By John Monczunski

The Dead Sea scroll bones tell a tale. Unfortunately, it’s much sketchier than Susan Guise Sheridan and other anthropologists had hoped it would be.

After a recent analysis of skeletal remains exhumed from 18 graves at Qumran, the archeological site in Israel associated with the ancient Dead Sea biblical scrolls, the Notre Dame forensic anthropologist can say this for sure: One was a teenager who had been ill most of his life, another was an old man who died in his 60s, another was an older woman, and the remainder were adult men, between 30 and 60 years of age. Nails from the coffins appear to be Roman in origin. And that, more or less, is it.

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Letters to the Editor

By Readers

Ethical business

The winter edition has a five-page article (“Take Your Conscience to Work”) discussing business ethics and how well Notre Dame has addressed ethics in business. On the very next page there is an article questioning whether Notre Dame has too many business majors. Given the ethical condition of corporate America, shouldn’t the question be whether Notre Dame has enough

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Letters to the editor: Web extra

By Readers

Harsh statement
Surviving in Manhattan makes some people overly defensive and brash, as Christina Conklin describes in her fine article, “Would it kill you to be nice?” If only that struggle were unique to New York. A letter to the editor in the winter issue complains about how “evil” a Notre Dame professor is and that he “should burn in hell for eternity.” I would appreciate never reading such a letter again in this magazine. Even our hardened Manhattan alumni know we are leaven in the modern world, not judges of damnation in the next!…

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Teachers Tell Their Stories

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

George Howard, professor of psychology, has published For the Love of Teaching. The book features 26 first-person essays by Notre Dame faculty members about how and why they teach, including a chapter by Father Edward Malloy, CSC, ND president. "It’s a way of depicting teaching at Notre Dame," says Howard.

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Overplayed party songs

By Ed Cohen

Notre Dame’s student magazine, Scholastic, recently listed what they consider to be the top 10 overplayed party songs.

10. “Piano Man,” Billy Joel.

9. “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun,” Cyndi Lauper

8. “Come on Eileen,” Dexy’s Midnight Runner

7. “You Shook Me All Night Long,” AC/DC

6. “That Was a Crazy Game of Poker,” O.A.R.…

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Are Juniper Road's Days Numbered?

By Ed Cohen

Juniper Road will no longer divide the campus if a road project proposed by University planners wins approval.

The University also is proposing a realignment of Edison Road with Angela Boulevard at the south end of campus and building a public park-like area to be called the Town Common where the campus meets the Northeast Neighborhood.…

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Relics of saints a blessing to Basilica

By Jennifer Osterhage '05

After the death of Blessed Brother Andre Bessette, CSC, in 1937, Catholics removed his heart and placed it in Saint Joseph’s Oratory, a large church in Montreal founded by Brother Andre.

The mysteriously non-decomposed body of Saint Bernadette, who told of being visited by the Blessed Virgin at Lourdes in the 19th century, lies in a glass tomb in Nevers, France. A finger believed to be the one that doubting Saint Thomas stuck in Jesus’ wounds is on display at the Church of the Holy Cross of Jerusalem in Rome.

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Tribe Sues over Piece of Campus

By Tom Tiberio '04

A Native American tribe in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula says it was cheated out of a piece of land on which a part of the Notre Dame campus now rests, but the University says it acquired the land legally.

In a lawsuit filed last December, the Hannahville Indian Community, a successor to the Potawatomi tribe, alleges that the state of Indiana illegally transferred Potawatomi-owned land to Notre Dame in violation of treaties dating to the 1820s.…

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Hall Portrait: Cavanaugh

By Jennifer Osterhage '05

Year Built: 1936

Capacity: 217

Male or female? Female since 1994

They Call Themselves: the Chaos

*Named for: *Father John William Cavanaugh, CSC, president from 1905-19. An English professor from Ohio, he was known for his ability to speak and write, and his eloquent speeches and sermons were often printed as literature. Cavanaugh rubbed elbows with politicians and authors he invited to campus, earning him the title "Notre Dame’s Ambassador." Rumor has it “Cavvy” knew the name of every person on campus. He was strict in running the University, but his wit and personal charm made him well-liked.

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Seen and Heard

By Ed Cohen

In the week leading up to Valentine’s Day, the Gender Studies Program and the departments of English, anthropology and film, television, and theatre (FTT) joined with Gay and Lesbian Alumni/ae of the University of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s College (GALA- ND/SMC) to sponsor the first-ever Notre Dame Queer Film Festival. The four-day event included screenings of films with gay or lesbian characters and subject matter, appearances by writers and directors, panel discussions and a screen-writing workshop. Among those returning to campus for the festival were two alums: author Tom O’Neil ‘77 (Movie Awards; The Emmys; The Grammys_) and Director Don Roos ’77 (_The Opposite of Sex, Bounce

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