News » Archives » May 2005

Strange Bedfellows

By Jeremy Manier '92

Hours before President George W. Bush spoke from his Texas ranch in August, 2001, to explain the administration’s new policy on funding for embryonic stem cell research, his aides told reporters that the momentous decision was comparable to sending troops to war.

The metaphor rang true for a controversy that had bitterly alienated the scientific community from religious leaders. Many people of faith — especially Catholics — held that research which destroys human embryos is always unacceptable. Biologists, who claimed no lesser love for human life, stressed that stem cells from embryos could bring treatments for diseases ranging from diabetes to Parkinson’s. Almost nightly, the two camps hashed out their differences in the primal scream debate format of cable news shows.…

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Empathy for Afghan Refugees

By Notre Dame Magazine

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Senior Luis Matos prays the rosary on the South Quad during an awareness-raising camp out organized by the Notre Dame Peace Coalition. In late February, 2002, 31 people slept overnight in tents during a snowstorm to express solidarity with Afghan refugees.


Notre Dame Magazine, Spring 2002

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The Eye of the Beholder

By Chet Raymo '58, '64Ph.D.

Edward O. Wilson and Wendell Berry are unlikely opponents in the cultural war. Both men have roots in rural America. Both men are motivated by a love of nature. Both men are prolific writers whose work is represented almost side by side in the The Norton Book of Nature Writing. Both men see environmental catastrophe in the offing if humans continue their wanton ways. Both men champion conservation and biodiversity.…

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The Notre Dame Man Who Beat Joe Louis

By Bob Walsh '48

A recent PBS documentary on the bitter Joe Louis-Max Schmeling rivalry brought to my mind another larger-than-life boxer named Max. He was a Polish-American from Chicago who earned a Notre Dame football scholarship in 1933, the same year he beat Joe Louis in the Golden Gloves finals in Boston. He thereafter billed himself as “The Man Who Beat Joe Louis.”…

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The Long Way Back

By Louis J. Glunz '84

For my 20th reunion last June I decided to bike to Notre Dame from Chicago. I have driven the sterile toll road route a hundred times, often wondering what the bike route would be like. The reunion gave me a purpose to be in South Bend, so I went for it.

My back-of-the-envelope navigation put the bike ride at 90 to 100 miles, with much of it on trails or back roads, so I knew it was doable. My mother and my sister tried to talk me out of it, but I was determined to ride.…

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My Notre Dame Parents

By Michael Dandurand '84

When I arrived as a freshman at Notre Dame in 1980, it was the first time I’d been away from my parents. Having lived in Hawaii all my life, my contact with the mainland United States was minimal; Disneyland at age 10 was it. I saw snow only on TV. South Bend, Indiana, was as foreign to me as most Midwesterners would consider Hawaii’s culture and customs to be. I was definitely a fish out of water.…

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Books in print & books in brief

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Hot Lights, Cold Steel: Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon’s First Years, Michael J. Collins, M.D., ’71 (St. Martin’s Press). A fast-paced memoir of the fear, heartbreak, humor and triumph of the author’s four-year residency in orthopedic surgery. Can that young boy’s leg be saved? How do you tell a woman she has widespread cancer? And when do you stop being bone tired? “We were learning that all the training and all the caring in the world were not going to solve every problem,” Collins writes. What he also learns is the role he truly plays as a doctor, a role in which compassion is integral to the treatment.

Commander of All Lincoln’s Armies: A Life of General Henry W. Halleck

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The Voice That's Launched 1,000 Skits

By Ed Cohen

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Commenting on the pending collision between the planet Earth and a giant comet, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan had this to say in January:

“While it remains to be seen what the ultimate impact of the comet will be, I would recommend that people pay only the minimum on your credit card balance.”…

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Numbers paint the picture

By John Monczunski

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The destruction of southern Louisiana by flood water is a thing of beauty. Not in reality, of course; that would be a terrible calamity. But on Joannes Westerink’s computer screen it appears as graceful swirls of red, yellow and blue undulating in a green sea, morphing over time across a map of the coast. The image, which could be abstract art, is in fact an animated graph of what would happen to the Louisiana coastline from a hurricane-generated storm surge. The undulating colors signify the depth of the flow, increasing from yellow to red.…

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Wonder drug in the making?

By John Monczunski

Someday SB-3CT might save your life. The collection of letters and numbers is chemical shorthand for a novel compound that has shown promise in stopping cancer spread and lessening the effects of a stroke.

Designed and synthesized by Notre Dame Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Shahriar Mobashery and his colleagues, the compound has the ability to inhibit two enzymes, MMP

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Read any good books lately?

By John Monczunski

The declining interest in reading is a cause of concern for Mark Roche, Notre Dame’s dean of Arts and Letters. His new book, Why Literature Matters in the 21st Century, published by Yale University Press, makes the case that great literature is being neglected today even though it is needed more than ever. Among other things, we recently asked the scholar of German literature why he believes that to be so and what does Liberty Valance have to do with all this any way?

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Nuclear weapons course receiving renewed interest

By Ed Cohen

A course that has been taught here for years, Nuclear Weapons and Nuclear Warfare, is enjoying renewed interest in the wake of fears about weapons of mass destruction.

The class teaches not only about the physics and technological aspects of nuclear weapons but covers ethical, legal and social dimensions.…

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Meeting through the Facebook

By Bridget Veihmeyer '05

Notre Dame senior Paul Joice opens his e-mail inbox and finds one new message. A young woman has requested to become his friend. But before that can happen, the message informs him, he has to confirm that they are, in fact, already friends.

Confused? You wouldn’t be if you were a college student and had heard of thefacebook.com, as most have.…

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Letters to the editor

By Readers

Father Malloy’s presidency

In “The Pastoral Presidency of Monk Malloy,” I believe one line was left out of the sidebar table of information entitled “Measuring Up.” That would be the cost of tuition. Even with the increase in financial aid awarded, is Notre Dame still within the reach of the middle class where so many of my classmates came from when I attended the University?…

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Letters to the editor: web extra

By Readers

On Father Malloy

If you think Father Malloy has preserved our Catholic identity, you lead a very narrow existence—i.e. the ND spokesperson on TV-in-house heretic McBrien and Vagina Monologues for four straight years. He’s a scandal and he’s embarrassed!

George Meyer
Concordia, Kansas

Your article on Father Malloy was very interesting. His long and distinguished career as president of Notre Dame will be long remembered by the students of the University, both past and present.…

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Music by ND people

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Wonderfall, wonderfall. The brothers Bregande—guitarists/vocalists Dave ‘95 and Joe—and bassist John Fletcher ’92 have been playing music together since 1998. Music should make you move, the band members believe, and that pop sensibility comes through in their melodic, energetic CD. The musicians, who released the CD Monday Morning, Start Again

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

President Bush’s chief speech writer during his second term will be former Wall Street Journal editorial-page writer William McGurn ‘80. . . . John Walker ’78 produced the Academy Award-winning animated feature The Incredibles. . . . Brett Galley ’97 was on the team of doctors at Loyola University Medical Center, west of Chicago, that cared for the world’s smallest surviving baby. The infant girl weighed 8.6 ounces at delivery last September. . . . The Illinois Republican Party elected Andrew McKenna ‘79

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Alumni Briefs

By the Notre Dame Alumni Association

Alumni Association Awards
The James F. Armstrong Award will be presented to Father Paul F. Doyle, CSC, ’65, ’75M.Th., at Alumni Senate in April in recognition of his distinguished service to the University. Doyle was a trustee and fellow of the University from 1991 to ’97 during his tenure as religious superior of the Holy Cross priests for the Indiana Province. He is associate rector of the Basilica of the Sacred Heart and has been rector of Dillon Hall since 1997.…

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Swimming test still sinks some

By Ed Cohen

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Every year about 200 students fail the University’s mandatory swimming test and have to take eight weeks of swimming lessons.

The test requires students to complete four 25-meter lengths of the Rolfs Aquatic Center pool demonstrating both front and backstrokes.

The swimming requirement is believed to date to World War II, when drowning was a more frequent cause of death and the Navy encouraged colleges to institute swimming requirements and training.…

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Checkback: Design Laboratory results

By Ed Cohen

How did Notre Dame’s art students do representing the United States at the Global Design Laboratory 2004?

Notre Dame was the only North American university chosen to compete at what is known as the Olympics of product design. For the contest, which culminated in New York City in November, 2004, students were challenged to develop concepts for new kitchen and laundry appliances for three distinct client groups: baby boomers, urban dwellers and people living in developing nations.…

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Folk Choir's anniversary concert

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The Folk Choir is planning what figures to be an enormous reunion concert in the Basilica on May 7, 2005, to celebrate the choir’s 25th anniversary (and raise money for the Holy Cross missions). For more information, visit www.nd.edu/~folk/reunion.html or contact Kelly Kingsbury (kkingsbu@nd.edu, 574-472-1034 or 574-631-7270), the choir’s alumni relations officer.…

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The king of off-campus

By Emily Howald '05

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U.S. 31 Business is as far west as he goes. Eddy Street is as far east. He won’t head farther north than Corby Street, and two miles south of campus is his limit.

What, you might wonder, is contained in this geographical block?

Landlord Mark Kramer’s off-campus housing kingdom.…

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Hall Portrait: Keenan

By Emily Howald '05

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Year Built: 1957

Capacity: 293

Male or Female: Male

They Call Themselves: Knights

Named For: James Keenan ‘13, who underwrote construction of the hall as a memorial to his son, James, Jr., who died in 1941 just as his college years were about to begin. The Keenans were from Fort Wayne and owned and operated a chain of hotels in the Midwest.…

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Letter from Campus: Gung Hay Fat Choy

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

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February 9 was the first day of the new year. Oh, perhaps not to most people at Notre Dame, some of whom may have spent January 1 recovering from their celebration of the night before. But for the Asian community on campus, it was the Lunar New Year and it was time to celebrate.

“It’s a big deal,” says Xiaoyue Zhang, a graduate student and outgoing president of the Notre Dame Chinese Friendship Association (NDCFA

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A Death in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

EDWARD J. CRONIN ‘38, a legendary professor in the Program of Liberal Studies who taught at Notre Dame for nearly 50 years, passed away on Christmas Day at age 88. He so loved what he taught —literature, especially James Joyce’s Ulysses — that in class he would often read aloud a line from a book and ask, “Isn’t that beautiful?” He said his wish was to die sitting on a bench at the Grotto reading Dickens. He actually was at a local nursing home when he died. The PLS

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Domers in the Media

By Mary Kate Castellani '05 and Ed Cohen

Selected alumni working in print and broadcast journalism


Ken Woodward ‘57 (English), contributing editor, Newsweek. As a student: editor and business manager, Scholastic; writer, The Dome; contributor, The Juggler

Mark Shields ’59 (Philosophy and History), television political analyst (PBS, CNN), syndicated columnist. As a student: didn’t work in the student media.…

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The student media frenzy

By Ed Cohen

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The stage manager signals everyone to be quiet, and onto the set of The Mike Peterson Show walks the star himself.

Mike Peterson is lanky sophomore with a youthful, eager face. Wearing a dark suit, white dress shirt and a blue-and-gold Notre Dame tie, he looks more like the bride’s kid brother than the host of a late-night talk show. But this isn’t the NBC

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The Slice of Life

By Mike Alexander '72

There is a refreshing directness to it. DEATHS.

Gathering magazines to recycle, I ended up with a small stack of Notre Dame Magazines, six random issues from Summer 2002 to Summer 2004. I paged through them, wondering if I had missed anything. It turned out that I had: a few of the endpapers from the book of life. Near the back of each issue, simple and straightforward, DEATHS

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Eulogy for the Anonymous Dead

By Paul Hundt '60

I come from a long line of anonymous dead. They led modest, respectable lives. They loved their families, practiced their religion to varying degrees and, after death, were buried in the Catholic cemeteries of the City of New York. They have submerged with barely a trace. It is my fate as well.

When my German-born grandfather died in 1933, he left my grandmother his share of a successful business and a fine house in Hollis, Queens. She said, “My life is over!” and then lived another 40 years. When she finally did die at age 91 after 10 years in a nursing home, the business had passed on to others. Her beloved house was gone. Her fine “things,” her china, her glassware, her furniture, had long been distributed among her children and grandchildren.…

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The Pull of Belonging

By Kimber Lybbert

I recently took my Scout troop to the local fish hatchery. After a trip around the grounds and a turn at feeding the fish boiling in a crowded tank, we watched a short film. It outlined the life of a salmon from its birth through the final heroic journey back to its hatching place. When the lights came back on, several boys looked puzzled. “Why do they go back?” they asked. Our guide just shook his head. “Nobody knows.”…

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