News » Archives » October 2011

@nd.edu: Thoreau wouldn’t own a smartphone

By Tara Hunt ’12

Long before technology wrapped its gnarled fingers around man and became its master, Henry David Thoreau wisely said, “Men have become the tools of their tools.” Decades and now five iPhone versions later, we have entered an age where instead of holding our smartphones, our smartphones have a chokehold on us.

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Networthy ND 19

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

You can’t say ND people don’t have wide interests. The fate of Western capitalism, the specter of a drone world war, how to predict stock prices by using Google, and what happens if we meet an unfriendly E.T. are among the issues ND folk weighed in on recently.

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What fools these mortals be

By Patrick Dunne ’60

When as an adjunct professor of English in Texas, I taught (or perhaps more accurately exposed) the skill of essay writing to college freshmen, I customarily would assign as my students’ first research project the Authorship Question: Who wrote Shakespeare?

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Her songs, her way

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Kate Borkowski says she’s been told “my speaking voice sounds like a kid.” When she actually was a kid, singing around the house, her parents would advise her: “Belt it out!” The singer-songwriter will have none of that.

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Getting in the game, from Peter Sellers to Captain America

By Sean B. Scanlon ’91

The projects Stephen McFeely ’91 and Chris Markus have been taking on for the past decade are ripe for potential sermonizing. As the screenwriting team for this summer’s Captain America: The First Avenger and for The Chronicles of Narnia movies, McFeely and Markus have resisted many opportunities to swing for the allegorical fences.

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Road Warrior app

By John Monczunski

Does the thought of merging onto the freeway cause you to break into a cold sweat? When you gun your car, hurtling down the entrance ramp, do you pray fast and furious to Everything Holy, begging for a gap that lets you ease into the flow alive and unscathed?

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Far Afield: Taunt is cheap

By Jason Kelly '95

How do you know when the vapors have overcome college football? When an official pulls out a yellow handkerchief, not to fan himself over the affront to his sensibilities, but to call a taunting penalty on . . . Navy.

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By Design: Walking Rome

By Dennis Doordan

Walking: it can be hard on your soles but good for the soul. This past summer I spent four weeks in Rome, a city that offers ample rewards to hardy visitors willing to walk.

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Let me tell you . . .

By Kerry Temple ’74

I believe in the healing of story. I think it’s good for people to talk it out. There is something clarifying, curative, restorative in the telling; some would call it “therapeutic.”

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If you can’t beat ’em, eat ’em

By Tara Hunt ’12

Notre Dame graduate students Matt Barnes, Andy Deines and Sheina Sim are not your average chefs — really they’re not chefs at all — but they are convinced their studies of invasive species can help you put together both an eco-friendly and appetizing menu for your next tailgate.

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Culinary counterattack

By Tara Hunt ’12

In theory, the invasivore idea is brilliant: Eat what you want to reduce. But is it reasonable? Should people who don’t frequently peruse edible plant and survival encyclopedias forage in the woods and try to make use of nature’s ingredients? I decided to find out.

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Proteins: Know when to fold ’em

By John Monczunski

Life owes a lot to origami. Seriously. It’s all about the fold. As with the ancient Japanese paper art form, newly synthesized proteins bend back on themselves to become functional, three-dimensional structures.

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Protestant school graduates less political

By John Monczunski

Graduates of Protestant Christian schools place a higher value on family matters and are less likely to be engaged politically than their peers attending Catholic or nonreligious private schools, according to a recent study of Christian education in North America conducted by Notre Dame sociologist David Sikkink.

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Collateral damage

By Kerry Temple ’74

Some wounds are obvious. Others are hidden to the eye. But invisible scars — the ones lurking in the human psyche — can be just as crippling, similarly painful, and possibly much tougher to repair.

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