News » Archives » February 2011

Lazy I: Signs in the sand

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

I’ll speak for myself: I’ve done a poor job paying attention to North Africa and the Middle East during my lifetime. I suspect this is true of most Americans, but I shouldn’t presume. I know I wasn’t expecting the news from Tunisia last month. Now I can’t look away.

Read More

Far afield: Game changer

By Jason Kelly '95

Reports that Dave Duerson had killed himself didn’t make me think of football at first. They stirred up vague recollections about business and family problems. The game’s potential role didn’t register until the chilling detail that he shot himself in the chest, preserving his brain to be tested for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) — a football side effect.

Read More

Believing: An artist at work

By Michael Garvey '74

The great Jacques Maritain may have been less authoritative an art critic than a philosopher, but it’s difficult not to sympathize with his grumpy remark that far too many of the artists of his own era had found “a means of releasing the resentments of a boorish soul and getting at little cost the admiration of an idiotic public.”

Read More

Letters

By Notre Dame Magazine Recipients

Catholic Closet

James Lang’s essay (“Coming Out of the Catholic Closet”) is baffling. Before moving to Notre Dame in 1995, I spent 25 years in four quite different secular universities, including a decade at the Big Ten’s premier research university, Michigan. My catholic colleagues and I never hid our faith, nor did non-Catholic or non-believing colleagues ever sneer at out Catholicism. Conceivably the English department at Northwestern is a hotbed of old-fashioned anti-popery, though, I would want more evidence than Lang’s anecdotes. Over-generalizing from one young man’s experiences results in a slander on secular academe.…

Read More

Financial Aid Growing Faster than Tuition

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The cost of a Notre Dame education continues to rise but at the lowest rate in decades, and increases in financial aid continue to outpace increases in tuition and fees.

Trustees approved an increase of $1,150 in tuition and $290 in room and board for next fall, bringing the average undergraduate student’s bill to $29,100 a year. The combined increase of $1,440 or 5.2 percent is the smallest, percentage-wise, in two decades. Looked at separately, the rise in tuition – an identical 5.2 percent – is the slimmest since 1960, when tuition was $1,000 a year and was left unchanged following a hike of $100 or 11 percent in 1959.…

Read More

Enter Millennium Here

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Notre Dame’s classically oriented School of Architecture is overseeing a contest to design a monumental entrance to the District of Columbia in celebration of the New Millennium.

The competition, limited to students and young professionals, will be conducted in two phases. In the first, entrants will submit designs in line with the gate’s theme, which is to reaffirm “the central role the nation’s capital plays in our civic life.” The Millennium Gate Foundation and School of Architecture, cosponsors of the contest, are looking for a classical style to reinforce the traditions established by architect Pierre Charles L’Enfant in his original 1793 plan for Washington. A jury of American and international architects will select the best submission and name up to 12 architects to collaborate on the final design.…

Read More

That's My Asteroid

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

A five-mile-wide rock floating between Mars and Jupiter has a Notre Dame scientist’s name on it.

The International Astronomical Union recently dubbed the rock, Asteroid Rettig in honor of Terry Rettig, associate professor of physics.

The naming came about on the recommendation of the asteroid’s discoverer, Ted Bowell of the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona. Rettig, who specializes in the chemistry of comets, co-authored the book Completing the Inventory of the Solar System

Read More

Wondering Out Loud

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

What was that Sieg, heil! thing in Nazi Germany all about? And whose job was it to shout sieg?

“Sieg, heil!” was the Nazi victory cry. “Sieg” is German for “victory” and “heil” means “hail,” as in “hail to thee.” But it also means “salvation,” so “sieg heil” meant both “hail to victory” and “victory and salvation.” Jehovah’s Witnesses in the Third Reich refused to say “Heil Hitler” because to them it would have been like saying salvation came from Hitler and they believed salvation could only come from God. “Sieg and “heil” were used in call-and-response fashion at Nazi rallies. Usually the speaker cried “sieg” after his talk and the crowd “heil”-ed back. When Hitler finished speaking, one of his deputies would make the “sieg” call.…

Read More

Business Major shows Wall Street how it's Done

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Junior John C. Lavan lived out every business major’s dream last fall when his name and picture appeared atop the front page of the Money & Investing section of the Wall Street Journal. Lavan won the paper’s periodic Investment Dartboard contest by e-mailing a stock pick to the journal’s interactive edition and seeing it outperform stocks picked by investment professionals and by Journal

Read More

Soccer Senior in Rare Company with Mia Hamm

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Mia Hamm, generally considered the greatest women’s soccer player in history, was the first player ever to record more than 70 goals and 70 assists during a college career.

Now there’s a second: Notre Dame senior Jenny Streiffer.

A two-time athletic as well as a two-time academic All American, Streiffer completed her college career last fall with 70 goals and 71 assists. Hamm recorded 103 goals and 72 assists at North Carolina.…

Read More

Unlikely Endings to Student Elections

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

It was a weird year in student government elections as the student body presidents at both Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s took office amid controversy.

The strange happenings started at Saint Mary’s, where the vote for president and vice president ended in an unprecedented tie. Two tickets received 712 votes in a runoff that followed an initial four-ticket balloting. In the third vote, held two days after the deadlocked second, one of the tickets received 51 percent of the ballots.…

Read More

Gay-Lesbian Outreach Moves to Masses

By Ed Cohen

The administration hasn’t changed its opposition to recognizing an independent group for gay and lesbian students, but Campus Ministry engaged in some pastoral détente fall semester.

As Masses in the Basilica and the residence halls the last weekend in October, volunteers passed out a card with a rainbow-colored ribbon and pin attached. On the front was a prayer expressing thankfulness for life’s diversity and asking divine help to be more inclusive of gays and lesbians in the Notre Dame community. “I will stand with Christ, in community, with all my brothers and sisters” was the refrain of a pledge on the back.…

Read More

Lost Weekend

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Not every tradition at Notre Dame lasts forever. One that passed into history this spring was Sophomore Sibs Weekend.

Joe Cassidy, director of student activities, said he decided to pull the plug on the weekend – which records indicate began in 1979 but wasn’t a regular event until the 1990s – for a combination of reasons including light participation. Less than 20 percent of sophomores have had their brothers or sisters to campus for this special weekend in recent years. Cassidy said the numbers didn’t justify the disruption in hall social life the weekend entailed.…

Read More

Gates Foundation Grant Targets Elephantiasis

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation awarded a $5.2 million grant to Notre Dame for a five-year program to research, treat and build resources for eliminating the disease that causes elephantiasis in Haiti.

Rev. Thomas G. Streit, CSC, research assistant professor of biological sciences, will direct the program in collaboration with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The effort focuses on lymphatic filariasis, a disease afflicting some 120 million people in the tropics. Often carried by mosquitoes, the disease is rarely fatal but permanently maims and disfigures its victims. It has been endemic in Haiti since at least the 17th century.…

Read More

Investigation Lands Football Program on First-Ever Probation

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Athletics personnel are now expected to report any situation that even suggests improper conduct or potential rules violations. More than ever before, coaches will be evaluated on the progress their players make off the field. And every official fan club of a Notre Dame team has been disbanded.

Those are some of the actions President Malloy said the University has taken in light of an NCAA

Read More

In Memorium

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Mike Berticelli, men’s soccer coach since 1990, died of a heart attack at his home in January. He was being treated for cardiomyopathy, a condition that enlargens and weakens the heart but was in good health otherwise and his death, at age 48, came as a shock. Survivors include his wife, Cinda, and two sons: Nino, a 1999 ND graduate, and Anthony, a junior. In his 10 seasons at Notre Dame, Beticelli’s teams compiled a record of 104-80-19 and participated in three NCAA

Read More

No More ND Logo Products from Countries that Ban Unions

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Notre Dame has taken the lead again in the anti-sweatshop movement, this time prohibiting the manufacture of any licensed products in countries – including China- that don’t recognize the right of workers to form unions.

The University made the announcement in January along with the University of California system. They were believed to be the first institutions to restrict licensees in this way.…

Read More

Business College Renamed for Donors

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The College of Business Administration has changed its name to the Mendoza College of Business in recognition of the largest single gift in the history of Notre Dame – $35 million from 1973 alumnus Thomas F. Mendoza and his wife, Kathy.

Tom Mendoza, who earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from ND, is senior vice president of sales and marketing for the Silicon Valley firm Network Appliance, described as the leading provider of network attached data access and management solutions. In 1999 Fortune

Read More

Molarity Classic 53-57

By Michael Molinelli '82

What were Jim Mole and friends doing at Notre Dame in 1978? They all need to get a room. Strips 53-57 of the popular comic strip Molarity, which previewed in The Observer in 1977.

Read More

Soundings: Threads of life

By Kerry Temple ’74

It’s one of the best benefits of working at this magazine — developing very good friends, despite the distances, whom you come to know through their writing, by talking out story ideas and life and writing with them.

Read More

Ideal for complex calculations or as a between-meals snack

By Ed Cohen

When Peter Kogge, a 1968 Notre Dame graduate, makes presentations to his fellow computer scientists about the work he’s doing, helping develop a memory chip unimaginably smarter than anything in existence, he has a surprise waiting for the audience at the end: The miracle chip is already in production.…

Read More

Some Memory Improves with Age

By John Monczunski

The humorist Fred Allen once said, “I always have trouble remembering three things: faces, names and . . . I can’t remember what the third thing is.” The older we get, the more most of us relate to that statement. But, contrary to popular wisdom, memory – at least a certain type – actually may improve with age, says Notre Dame’s Gabriel Radvansky.…

Read More

Appleby: Gay Priests No Surprise

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

R. Scott Appleby, director of Notre Dame’s Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, said a newspaper report indicating there are significant numbers of gay priests “will come as little or no surprise to most Catholic parishioners,” and it doesn’t necessarily cause Catholics great concern to know or suspect their priest has a homosexual orientation.…

Read More

Father Newton off to Africa

By Ed Cohen

If Father Steve Newton, CSC, were a character in a movie instead of the real-life rector of Sorin Hall, the announcement he made at the annual hall banquet last November would have had predictable results.

Newton, a 1970 Notre Dame graduate, chose the occasion to inform residents that this, his 11th year in charge of the campus’s oldest dorm, would be his last. He was moving to East Africa next summer, he told them, to help the Congregation of Holy Cross develop desperately needed education and treatment programs for alcoholism and other addictions in Kenya and Uganda.…

Read More

New AD from Arizona

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

As the search committee’s members listened to advice about who would make the ideal athletic director for Notre Dame, President Edward Malloy said, “one name kept coming up.”

In March 2000 Malloy spoke that name at a press conference in the Main Building when he introduced Arizona State athletic director Kevin White as the 11th athletic director of Notre Dame and the first who will report directly to the president.…

Read More

Film Festival Now on Video

By Jaclyn Villano

Fans of Notre Dame’s annual Student Film Festival can now relive those cherished and sometimes bizarre memories at home.

Recently released on video, The Loft Tapes is a 110-minute compilation of the best student-made films created in undergraduate film courses at Notre Dame between 1993 and 1997. Two-person student teams wrote and directed each film in approximately eight weeks for about $900.…

Read More