News » Archives » March 2011

Echoes: The Collegiate Jazz Festival

By Anthony Monta

The CJF is the oldest festival of its kind in the country. In the late 1950s, a student named Tom Cahill ’59, feeling the blues falling around his fellow Irish, hit on the idea that maybe what the campus needed at that time of year was some green burst of spontaneity. Maybe some jazz, new jazz by students, maybe a competition.

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The Playroom: The memory tree

By Maraya Goyer Steadman ’89, ’90MBA

There is a tree we pass when we walk to and from the lake. As we walk by, the dog approaches it, sniffs, pauses. This tree holds memories for me, and I would like to think the dog has found them, that some part of me he can sense still lingers there in the roots tangled in the sand.

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Networthy ND 11

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

This edition of Networthy ND features several items related to the tragic suicide death February 17 of Notre Dame football great Dave Duerson ’83. Also featured are links to two noteworthy videos produced by Notre Dame alums.

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Far afield: Playing through pain

By Jason Kelly '95

I don’t claim to know what’s right for anyone in mourning, but in sports there seems to be only one choice: Play through the pain, with black armbands, helmet stickers, initials inked onto sneakers and moments of silence.

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The Playroom: Samson’s butt

By Maraya Goyer Steadman ’89, ’90MBA

I decided to take two 6-year old boys to the Chicago Art Institute. I used to go to the lectures there on Tuesday nights after work and then walk around the quiet halls, perfectly happy to be in that place alone, appreciating the art. Today, 20 years later, I am no longer alone walking quiet galleries. I am yelling my fool head off.

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Believing; For dust like us

By Michael Garvey '74

In the last quarter of the 19th century, near what has since become Gallup, New Mexico, while the United States and its military were persecuting the Navajo people, a U.S. Army surgeon named Washington Matthews, who had learned the Navajo language, sat down with Old Torlino, a Navajo priest, and asked him who the Navajo people were.

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