News » Archives » June 2012

Far afield: Top IX moments in ND history

By Jason Kelly '95

For years Notre Dame women’s basketball players operated in relative obscurity, but they could always play. And once, on the old courts outside Stepan Center, a couple of them offered an impromptu clinic to a skeptical local audience. Skylar Diggins, and all she represents, was not yet a glint in anybody’s eye, but Karen Robinson ’91 and Coquese Washington ’92, ’97J.D. were her equivalent at the time.

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Believing: Declaring our independence

By Michael Garvey '74

The quaint word “fortnight” had seldom been heard in America before the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops adopted it for use in a campaign for religious liberty. A principal concern of the USCCB’s “Fortnight for Freedom” is, of course, a federal law that could require conscientious private employers (most notably Catholic ones) to support services morally repugnant to them.

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The Playroom: Room Mom

By Maraya Goyer Steadman '89, '90MBA

Last year I was a room parent for one of the first-grade classrooms at my children’s school. This year I decided the second-graders were better off without me and my efforts to impress the wellness committee with veggie skeletons and cauliflower brains at the Halloween party.

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Babies listen up

By John Monczunski

Babies are fantastic listeners. They may not know what you’re saying, but they pay rapt attention to language, and they are constantly looking for patterns to help them make sense of it all.

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Miserly Catholics?

By John Monczunski

Notre Dame sociologist Christian Smith is leading a multiyear study aimed at learning why some folks are more generous than others. Although the work, which involves scholars from ND and other institutions, is far from complete, Smith has found one preliminary result that Catholics may find unflattering: As a group, we’re tight.

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The plea of no return

By Christina Pesoli ’91J.D.

I used to think Facebook made it easy to be friends. And I guess it can if you use it correctly. But Facebook makes it easier to be a superficial friend. After all, occasionally “liking” something your “friend” says is not the same as actually being there.

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Far afield: Woolridge, remembered

By Jason Kelly '95

When Orlando Woolridge died last month, the collected details of his life and personality illustrated just how little I knew about the man who once inspired my rapt attention — how little we all know about the athletes who pass through our consciousness, then go on with their lives while we size up their replacements.

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The Playroom: The traveler

By Maraya Goyer Steadman '89, '90MBA

Today is the first day of our family vacation in Texas. I’m super cranky. I could blame it on flying by myself with three kids, renting a car, getting lost, finally finding the hotel, then getting everyone fed, bathed and in front of a television. But that’s not it. I am not a good traveler.

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Lazy I: Time, stand still

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Maybe it’s that I’m within a blink of turning 40, maybe it’s that my oldest will start junior high this August. Whatever the cause, I find myself lately taking mental snapshots of my family.

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