News » Archives » August 2012

The Playroom: Reasons why I'm tired

By Maraya Steadman '89, '90MBA

Maraya Steadman

I am tired all the time. A friend of mine is also tired all the time. It turns out we are tired because we are stressed out, we are sleeping on the wrong pillow, we drink too much coffee, we don’t take the right supplements or drink enough water or eat enough protein, and our chi is wonky. We also don’t get enough sleep because we have children.

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Dublin Days: Culture shock

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

Given the shared language and many cultural norms, Americans and Irish don’t experience culture shock when visiting each other’s countries the same way they might in non-English-speaking locales. I had much less trouble adjusting to living abroad than my friends in France did, but some aspects of Irish life still surprised me.

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Dublin Days: More than potatoes

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

Ireland is no France or Greece when it comes to culinary excellence. But it’s not all black pudding and crubeens, either. During my time abroad I searched the city for tasty treats on a limited budget. Here’s what I found.

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Red Bull road trip

By John Clements

It started innocently enough. We had scarcely enough time to swing from Houston to Chicago to Madison to South Bend to Bloomington in six days — no time to fool around — we had a job to do. Leave it to my 17-year-old daughter to propose a solution: We’ll just drink Red Bull the whole way.

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Dublin Days: Tips for tourists

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

If there’s one thing you need to know before you go to Dublin, it’s that you’re not Irish. It doesn’t matter what your last name is or how you celebrate St. Patrick’s Day or which county your great-great-great grandparents came from. None of these things make you Irish. I hate to break it to you, but if you were born and/or raised on American soil, you are American. Irish American, yes, but American nonetheless.

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Entertaining the Tweeting Irish

By Ted Mandell

ND vs

No doubt if you’re reading this, you’ve already seen the new Shamrock Series uniform, being worn by Notre Dame for one game in Chicago, in October, when the Irish play Miami.

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Soundings: By Popular Demand

By Kerry Temple ’74

125year_ndfootball_posterthumbnail

That football cover is a poster now.
We liked the retro style. It had the right feel to convey the historic sense of Notre Dame’s football tradition, but with a sort of bright, new shine.

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Beyond the silence

By Thomas O’Grady ’85Ph.D.

Not long ago, a friend emailed me from Dublin with an unusual request. He and his siblings were finalizing a two-sided bookmark-sized memorial card for their parents, who had passed away within several years of each other, and wanted to include a couple of poems on the card to express their loss.

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Dublin Days: Introvert problems

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

My heart pounded frantically as the curtains inched apart, the anticipation stretching a few seconds into an eternity. What have I gotten myself into? I thought. I can’t sing. I can’t act. As the opening of “Party Rock Anthem” filled the air, I smiled and shifted to autopilot, thankful for the power of muscle memory. Just dance.

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Far afield: What do we expect?

By Jason Kelly '95

Jason Kelly

Urban Meyer violated one of the terms of his Ohio State coaching contract on the first day the football team gathered this summer. Not his contract with the university, the six-year deal worth $26-plus million. Meyer breached the agreement he made with his family.

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New Yorkers are people, too

By Katie Hicks

Katie Hicks

One afternoon, after quietly vomiting in a handicapped bathroom, I walked out of my office into a street filled with strangers, leaned against a hotel building and cried. Tourists wearing “I Love NY” T-shirts and professionals in suits and sensible shoes stared as they walked by me, but I was past shame and embarrassment.

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Dublin Days: Study abroad problems

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

Receiving my acceptance letter from Notre Dame ranks first on my list of life-changing moments. Getting my decision letter from Trinity College Dublin comes in a close second. The catch was that while my friends would spend either the fall or spring in London, Angers, Toledo or Salvador da Bahia, I would leave them and my home under the Dome for our entire junior year.

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Dublin Days: Class registration woes

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

Task-oriented Americans and people-oriented Irish don’t always see eye to eye. As an introverted American in Ireland, I struggled to balance the Irish gift of gab with my own desire for minimum human interaction and maximum efficiency.

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Networthy ND 24

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

An ND alumna designed an award-winning way to improve patient care during breast biopsies, while an ND professor has put Shakespeare on the iPad. Other ND connections are meeting Stephen Colbert and Reggie Brooks in this edition of Networthy ND.

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Tattered saints

By Robert Mortensen ’52

My understanding of the Divine Mystery goes back to 1994 with a sleepless night in a Japanese hospital where I was recovering from a near-fatal illness.

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Dublin Days: Having the craic without sounding thick

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

Aw lads, getting used to Irish accents is one thing, but sometimes their unfamiliar slang can make you feel like a right eejit. From telling a friend to “Cop on!” when he’s being thick for asking for a lift to your mate’s gaff, there’s no question that Irish English can sometimes seem like a foreign language.

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The Playroom: Smiley face

By Maraya Steadman '89, '90MBA

Maraya Steadman

I am now sending my 5-year-old daughter to karate in her older brother’s shirts because they are long enough to cover the gigantic smiley face he drew on the butt of her karate pants in permanent orange marker.

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Dublin Days: My year abroad

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

Whether it’s from a lifetime of yelling yourself hoarse cheering for the Fighting Irish, years of listening to your grandparents trace the family tree back to the Famine or the last few months spent trying to get tickets to the Notre Dame-Navy game in Dublin, Ireland has likely lodged itself into some aspect of your life.

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The professor of rock

By Michael Rodio ’12

Like any good rock musician, Don Savoie looks like a mechanic. His graying hair is messy, his flannel shirt is wrinkled and his black jeans are faded. He talks just like he sings, with a gravelly tenor somewhere between a hoarse whisper and a throaty six-cylinder.

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Racing up the best-seller list

By Tamara Lytle

Mike MacKenzie wrote his college application essay on mortification. One minute his mom was a Cub Scout leader and car-pool driver. The next, she was a published romance novelist and his friends were calling him from bookstores reading racy passages before he could disconnect.

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The ride of a lifetime

By Bruce Lawrie

“Faster, Daddy,” my daughter calls from the back seat, “faster!” But we’re already going too fast. The back wheel of my mountain bike snakes through a patch of gravel on the rutted road dropping into a deep valley, Emily trailing me on the extension bike.

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