News » Archives » 2012

Dublin Days: Introvert problems

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

My heart pounded frantically as the curtains inched apart, the anticipation stretching a few seconds into an eternity. What have I gotten myself into? I thought. I can’t sing. I can’t act. As the opening of “Party Rock Anthem” filled the air, I smiled and shifted to autopilot, thankful for the power of muscle memory. Just dance.

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Far afield: What do we expect?

By Jason Kelly '95

Jason Kelly

Urban Meyer violated one of the terms of his Ohio State coaching contract on the first day the football team gathered this summer. Not his contract with the university, the six-year deal worth $26-plus million. Meyer breached the agreement he made with his family.

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New Yorkers are people, too

By Katie Hicks

Katie Hicks

One afternoon, after quietly vomiting in a handicapped bathroom, I walked out of my office into a street filled with strangers, leaned against a hotel building and cried. Tourists wearing “I Love NY” T-shirts and professionals in suits and sensible shoes stared as they walked by me, but I was past shame and embarrassment.

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Dublin Days: Study abroad problems

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

Receiving my acceptance letter from Notre Dame ranks first on my list of life-changing moments. Getting my decision letter from Trinity College Dublin comes in a close second. The catch was that while my friends would spend either the fall or spring in London, Angers, Toledo or Salvador da Bahia, I would leave them and my home under the Dome for our entire junior year.

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Dublin Days: Class registration woes

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

Task-oriented Americans and people-oriented Irish don’t always see eye to eye. As an introverted American in Ireland, I struggled to balance the Irish gift of gab with my own desire for minimum human interaction and maximum efficiency.

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Networthy ND 24

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

An ND alumna designed an award-winning way to improve patient care during breast biopsies, while an ND professor has put Shakespeare on the iPad. Other ND connections are meeting Stephen Colbert and Reggie Brooks in this edition of Networthy ND.

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Atlas Unplugged

By Liquid error: internal

A Minnesota pilgrim seeks enlightenment by biking the river road.

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Tattered saints

By Robert Mortensen ’52

My understanding of the Divine Mystery goes back to 1994 with a sleepless night in a Japanese hospital where I was recovering from a near-fatal illness.

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Dublin Days: Having the craic without sounding thick

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

Aw lads, getting used to Irish accents is one thing, but sometimes their unfamiliar slang can make you feel like a right eejit. From telling a friend to “Cop on!” when he’s being thick for asking for a lift to your mate’s gaff, there’s no question that Irish English can sometimes seem like a foreign language.

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The Playroom: Smiley face

By Maraya Steadman '89, '90MBA

Maraya Steadman

I am now sending my 5-year-old daughter to karate in her older brother’s shirts because they are long enough to cover the gigantic smiley face he drew on the butt of her karate pants in permanent orange marker.

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Dublin Days: My year abroad

By Meg Morrison '13

Meg Morrison

Whether it’s from a lifetime of yelling yourself hoarse cheering for the Fighting Irish, years of listening to your grandparents trace the family tree back to the Famine or the last few months spent trying to get tickets to the Notre Dame-Navy game in Dublin, Ireland has likely lodged itself into some aspect of your life.

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The professor of rock

By Michael Rodio ’12

Like any good rock musician, Don Savoie looks like a mechanic. His graying hair is messy, his flannel shirt is wrinkled and his black jeans are faded. He talks just like he sings, with a gravelly tenor somewhere between a hoarse whisper and a throaty six-cylinder.

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Racing up the best-seller list

By Tamara Lytle

Mike MacKenzie wrote his college application essay on mortification. One minute his mom was a Cub Scout leader and car-pool driver. The next, she was a published romance novelist and his friends were calling him from bookstores reading racy passages before he could disconnect.

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The ride of a lifetime

By Bruce Lawrie

“Faster, Daddy,” my daughter calls from the back seat, “faster!” But we’re already going too fast. The back wheel of my mountain bike snakes through a patch of gravel on the rutted road dropping into a deep valley, Emily trailing me on the extension bike.

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Unbalanced: Penn State, sex abuse and me

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Carol Schaal

The details are fuzzy now, but not the event. I was 9 years old and had finished my music lesson at a local dance/music studio. With time to spare before Dad picked us up, I went into the studio’s small two-way mirror room so I could watch my sister’s ballet class.

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Far afield: JoePa’s hollow pedestal

By Jason Kelly '95

Jason Kelly

It’s a familiar pattern repeated in similar circumstances far beyond Penn State, far beyond sports. Police, soldiers, priests, politicians—human beings—we all align ourselves with institutions that come to define us. To acknowledge flaws in them feels like a betrayal worse than the original misconduct.

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Soundings: That Leahy photo

By Kerry Temple ’74

Frank Leahy photo by Gordon DiRenzo, from University of Notre Dame Archives

“I was thumbing through this recent issue,” Gordon DiRenzo, Class of 1956, says, “until I got to page . . . let’s see, is it 21? No, it’s page 20. . . . Hey, where’d you get that photo? The photo of Leahy.”

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The tragic re-run

By Ted Mandell

Lather. Rinse. Repeat. Two days after the Colorado movie massacre, I stared at my laptop screen, reading one of the endless online commentaries. The media crush of the moment. The outrage around the country. The news cycle playing out…like a reality show re-run from four years ago.

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Soundings: Morning glory

By Kerry Temple ’74

Monday morning, early on. I am lying in bed, wondering when I got so old that mowing the lawn and splashing in a pool with the kids for an hour would leave me so tired and sore. The red numbers on the bedside clock tell me I should get up. But I like it here.

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An Irish four-pack

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Beer is as old as civilization, and among its qualities, beer folk say, is the fact that the right one can go with just about any food. Domers in the craft brewing industry hereby make their “case.”

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Back home again

By Maura Sullivan '11

As a Notre Dame student, one of the things I liked best about my beloved university was that my friends were from all over the country. Now that I’ve graduated, I hate that fact.

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Far afield: Elmer’s glue

By Jason Kelly '95

When the Four Horsemen, the seven mules and Knute Rockne’s other farm animals finished grazing, only Elmer Layden hung around the Notre Dame dining hall to bus tables. “He wasn’t asked to help, and he didn’t expect thanks,” wrote Red Smith, who knew because he was the student waiter on duty. “He just was, and is, that kind of gentleman.”

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