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Out of the Office: Scott Russell Sanders

By Kerry Temple ’74

Scott Russell Sanders stands behind the podium in the Hesburgh Center auditorium, a smallish venue, and reads from his latest project, yet unpublished — fictional stories to accompany a series of images by Peter Forbes, a Vermont-based photographer

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A Tale of Two Tapestries

By Danielle Rieger '16

Used and abused as it’s been by students for 62 years, O’Shaughnessy’s Great Hall had an allure and charm in its early days that had faded over time. In 2013, the College of Arts and Letters decided to restore it, as much as possible, to its original state. But something was missing.

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Notre Dame's No-Coal Goal

By John Copeland Nagle

I am writing this thanks to the electricity generated by Notre Dame’s power plant. The power plant has burned an increasing amount of natural gas in recent years, but coal has remained the mainstay of the campus power supply. That is about to change.

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410 ND football games, and counting

By Angela Sienko

DeShone Kizer’s wrist band from the September 26 UMass game will go into Stanley Weber’s extensive collection of Notre Dame memorabilia, which includes gloves Manti Te’o wore in 2012, old helmet chinstraps, even a referee’s whistle. But none of these things would be the most precious gem in the collection.

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Magnum Opus

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Paul Fritts & Company Organ Builders is one of a handful of shops in the United States capable of making mechanical action pipe organs as good as anything Bach ever played. With 70 stops and 5,164 pipes, rising to the height of a four-story building, the organ the company installs next year in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart will be the largest and grandest instrument it has produced since 1979, when the 28-year-old Fritts took over his father’s small business.

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Imagining the Murdy Organ

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

So, what will it all look like, this impressive instrument and its fortified perch, once they’re built and installed in the south end of the Basilica of the Sacred Heart? We don’t know.

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Deaths

By Alumni Association

Fred A. Deichmann ‘36, 03/05/2015, Newhall, CA
Vincent D. Foretich ’36, 04/23/2015, Newport News, VA
Clay M. Murray ’37, 06/10/2015, Tulsa, OK
William J. Eberhardt ’39, 06/19/2015, Tionesta, PA
James G.J. McGoldrick ’39,’42 JD, 04/22/2015, Cresskill, NJ
William F. Cleary ‘40, 11/13/2014, Glenshaw, PA
James L. Palmer ’40, 05/01/2015, Phoenix, AZ

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Letter from campus: to Robert Sedlack

By Erin Prill '06

Dear Robert,
The other day I was driving, thinking about you, and tears began to stream down my face. So I turned the radio on, and, much to my surprise, the Beastie Boys’ “Fight for Your Right (To Party)” came on. I laughed because I knew at that moment you were there, trying to bring a smile to my face — as you did for everyone in your life.

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A bridge to parish engagement

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

We’ve all seen it — a group of friends at a party or a family at a restaurant, communing with their smartphones, ignoring the people around them.

“Software can divide or atomize,” says Ryan Kreager ’11M.A., “or it can be a jumping off point for community.”

Supporting parish communities was the goal of Kreager, Shane O’Flaherty ’89 and Tim Connors ’89, who founded the business venture Growing the Faith. So the Notre Dame threesome spent a lot of time listening to church leaders and congregants, and discussing how they could build an app that would unite rather than divide. Additionally, says Kreager, Bishop Kevin Rhoades of the Fort Wayne-South Bend Diocese “served as a kind and helpful adviser.”…

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Before you know it

By Samuel Hazo '49

A close friend of mine, now in his mid-90s, wrote me a letter recently that contained this line: “Knowing is stifling; not knowing is creative.” He had been commenting on how people deal with their inevitable deaths. Some opted to live stoically, even penitentially. Others responded by creating a life in the time remaining. In some, knowledge of death’s certainty resulted in a kind of paralysis. For others, not knowing exactly when death would occur freed them to pursue alternatives that could be creative and fulfilling.…

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Her own path, unscripted

By Eric Butterman

Youngstown. Akron. West Bloomfield. New Canaan. Birmingham. Tarzana. St. Louis. Sounds like destinations on a train line. But for TV writer/producer Linda Gase ’86, they were all the places she had lived from the age of 5 until entering Notre Dame. Because her dad was transferred approximately every two years, so many towns she had called home, like TV shows, were suddenly canceled.

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Seen & heard

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

William Shakespeare scripted about three dozen plays, all written, reworked and refined by The Bard for performances throughout his lifetime. He didn’t publish many of those plays and produced no authoritative version of them before he died in 1616. But in 1623 two of Shakespeare’s fellow actors compiled 36 of his plays and published them in a 900-page volume, Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories & Tragedies, which has come to be known as the First Folio. It is believed that 750 copies were originally printed, of which 233 copies are known to exist. It is considered one of the most valued books in literature; a copy was sold at auction in 2001 for $6.2 million. The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., holds 82 copies, and to mark the 400th anniversary of the playwright’s death is lending the First Folio for exhibit at 53 U.S. sites — including Notre Dame. “First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare” will run throughout January at the Hesburgh Library and will include a multipanel display and other informational features. At Notre Dame the book will be opened to the page where visitors may read one of the world’s most quoted lines, “To be or not to be.” . . .…

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The girl next door

By Kate Kohs

“Can you play?”

I observed the girl at my door cautiously. It was the summer of 1999; I was 7 years old and in need of a friend. Although my three older brothers let me join in on their games, I could only endure so many defeats in pingpong, basketball and Super Smash Bros. before I was ready to quit. So when my 5-year-old neighbor showed up at our door, I thought that maybe she — dark hair springing, T-shirt stained — could be the sister I’d always wished for.…

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Explorer of the universe

By Kerry Temple ’74

Colleagues remember physicist V. Paul Kenney not only for his scientific contributions but also for the leadership, determination and humanity he brought to his research program.

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The book keeper's wish

By Kerry Temple ’74

I have a friend who is much more comfortable with the thought of dying than I am. A few years older, he cares for the elderly, stands watch with them, then ushers them through that eerie portal. He told me recently that death will be a buoyant moment because “all your spiritual guides will be there to welcome you into their company.”

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Enthusiastic infectious irrepressible

By Brendan O’Shaughnessy ’93

You wanted to be a part of whatever Robert Sedlack was concocting, and you always felt he wanted you to be a part of those plans. His great laugh and his energy were contagious. He organized parish picnics, St. Patrick’s Day parade themes and green-firetruck tailgaters. Robert was the Pied Piper, the connector, the glue guy of every group he belonged to.

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Editor's note: Gather 'round

By Kerry Temple ’74

They entered the kitchen singly, arriving randomly, while I was getting some coffee at work. A writer, a photographer and a videographer. They had all been to Milk River, Montana, on assignment for this magazine.

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The Pusher and Puller

By John Rudolf

Sarah Gruen ’13J.D. has helped a good many women rewrite their lives, turning haunting tales of abuse, addiction and prostitution into success stories of courage, strength and — quite possibly — deliverance.

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