Freedom: When I Have Driven Far Enough

By Kerry Temple ’74

It’s not real clear to me how memory works. Sometimes memories seem to drop right out of the sky. They’ll plop into your head like the first few warning shots of summer rain, when the sky has gone dark and the air has cooled and the first wet drops plunge to earth. Images fall into your head from some place far away. Then a downpour of impressions follows. Sometimes memory is like a landscape you rediscover. It reveals itself as you go back through it, unfolding its secrets as you retrace your steps one turn or corner at a time. That’s how it feels now.…

Read More

A note on the winter 2003¬04 contents

By Kerry Temple ’74

A funny thing happens on the way to growing up — a lot of years go by. One day you’re walking around the lakes, trying to figure out how you’ll fit into the real world, and the next thing you know you’ve got kids of your own facing the same dilemma. In between is a blur of living—dating, marriage and children, careers, housekeeping and all manner of callings, demands and responsibilities. So pretty soon, instead of trying to figure out how you’ll fit into the real world, you realize you already have.…

Read More

A note on the contents

By Kerry Temple ’74

The "Soul of a University" story in the Spring 2004 issue may be one of the most important stories we’ve ever done.

It originated this past fall during a lunch conversation with the author, Anthony DePalma, a longtime New York Times correspondent who was here as a visiting scholar at Notre Dame’s Kellogg Institute. I had planned to discuss his doing a piece for us on his areas of expertise (Latin America, Cuba), but I also wanted to know how his son, a Notre Dame senior, was doing. Aahren had had a terrible time with leukemia as a student here.…

Read More

Letter from Campus: Continuity

By Kerry Temple ’74

During his homily at the funeral Mass for Father Ned Joyce, Father Hesburgh told a little story that said a lot.

Hesburgh, who was then 32, spoke of meeting the young priest shortly after Joyce’s ordination in 1949. “It was less than an hour later,” recalled Hesburgh, who was executive vice president of the University at the time, “when I was leaving my office to go to Father John Cavanaugh’s office, my boss, the president, and as I got to the door it burst open, and out came this handsome and ebullient young priest. I said, ’You’ve got to be Ned Joyce,’ and he said, ‘Yes. Who are you?’ I said, ‘Ted Hesburgh,’ and I knelt down and said, ’You’d better give me that first blessing. It’s one of the best.’ And he did.”

Read More

The love that dare not speak its name

By Kerry Temple ’74

_'The love that dare not speak its name.'—Oscar Wilde_ A quarter century ago, in a conversation with a University officer about the role of _Notre Dame Magazine_ and its editorial philosophy, I was told that any topic was fair game—except homosexuality. The topic is no longer taboo, and during the past two decades the magazine occasionally has dealt with homosexuality on its pages, and it has always incited a heated reaction. Some say the magazine is too timid in its treatment of the subject; others say this magazine is no place to discuss such matters.

In all this time—until now—we've never had an openly gay person write a piece for the magazine about his or her sexual orientation. I recall only a few stories submitted by openly gay alumni about homosexual-related topics in the nine years I've been editor, and these didn't see print simply because they didn't meet the magazine's standards in terms of writing quality, style or approach. Of course, we didn't go looking for gay alumni to write for us either—until now.…

Read More

It really is in the mail

By Kerry Temple ’74

A bad thing happened with our summer issue, and it had nothing to do with the content.

The first clue came soon after the issue was mailed from Willard, Ohio, where it is printed. One morning we got four, large, brown envelopes full of back covers. That’s how we learn a magazine won’t make it to its destination. A postal worker rips off and returns the back cover (it holds the mailing label) and discards the rest of the issue. And we had four, big, thick envelopes full of “returns.”…

Read More