Topics

Alumni

We Are Hope-Brokers in Hell

By Antonio Anderson, SOLT, ’85

God is love, we learned in grade school catechism in Chicago or Houston or wherever we grew up, but here in the midst of a civil war in which, by some estimates, 100,000 Mexicans have been killed throughout the country in the last six years, it is essential to reiterate that revelation: God is love.

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What We've Done

By The editors

Rob Nabors, illustration by Emmett Baggett

Rob Nabors ’93 is President Obama’s deputy chief of staff. . . . Thaddeus “T.J.” Jones ’89 serves on the Pontifical Council for Social Communications — he’s the pope’s Twitter guy. #Wow. . . . John Sears ’60 was Ronald Reagan’s campaign manager and Richard Allen ’57, ’58M.A.

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We Are . . . .

By The editors

Theodore M. Hesburgh CSC,
Red Smith,
Jean Lenz OSV,
David Gaus,
Frank O’Malley,
Gustavo Gutierrez,
Steve Bartman,
Ara Parseghian,
Cindy Parseghian,
Molly Kinder,
Bob McDonnell,
Bruce Babbitt,
William H. Dempsey,
Joe Evans,
Mark Shields,
George Dohrmann,
Haley Scott DeMaria,
Tony Bill,
Bill Toohey CSC,
Jane Pitz,
Tom Moe,

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Campus and Community

Warm thoughts

By Jack Hefferon '14

A quick look at the calendar confirms that, yes, it is April 15. Tax Day. Major League Baseball’s opening day was last month, as was the first official day of Spring. The men’s and women’s lacrosse teams here have been playing outside since February. And the football team concluded its Spring practice on Saturday with the annual Blue-Gold game, where a high of 77 degrees coaxed out a crowd of nearly 28,000 to enjoy the day.

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Finding Strength in Others

By William Crowley '13

The moments alone with Adam were often the most difficult. We were roommates during our sophomore year at Notre Dame, so they occurred pretty frequently. Whether walking to the dining hall or cramming for an econ exam in Hesburgh, during those quiet and silent times together I chose my words painstakingly.…

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Warren Cartier’s home field

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Warren A. Cartier, an 1887 Notre Dame civil engineering graduate, donated land and lumber to establish an enclosed athletic field that for decades was home to ND’s football, baseball, and track and field teams. But it is in the neoclassical Ludington, Michigan, mansion he designed that Warren’s aesthetic and inventive character can be seen.

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Church

Mary

By Ashley Sinnott ’06

When I was little, God had a beard. He wore a blue robe, his hair grew thick as jump ropes and he was very, very old. When I learned someone named Mary was God’s mom, she confused this picture, so at first I didn’t care for her much.

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Applause for the Magi

By Mark Phillips

Late in that very rainy autumn the good citizens of the river city of Olean, New York, debated whether to permit a soup kitchen into their downtown business district on North Union Street.

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Still Catholic

By Michael Garvey '74

While other may find cause to stray — in protest or indifference — he has plenty of reasons to stay with this maddeningly human, redemptively divine social sacrament with people like himself.

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Current Affairs

We Are Hope-Brokers in Hell

By Antonio Anderson, SOLT, ’85

God is love, we learned in grade school catechism in Chicago or Houston or wherever we grew up, but here in the midst of a civil war in which, by some estimates, 100,000 Mexicans have been killed throughout the country in the last six years, it is essential to reiterate that revelation: God is love.

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The meeting place

By Jay Walljasper

Bill Kauffman stands out as a poster child for independent thinking about the political future of our country. His book Look Homeward America: In Search of Reactionary Radicals and Front- Porch Anarchists was published by the uncompromising right-wing publisher ISI Books and endorsed by left-wing luminary Gore Vidal. A former aide to Democratic Senator Pat Moynihan and a former editor at the libertarian magazine Reason

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Soundings: Olympic ideals

By Kerry Temple ’74

I grew up under the cloud of Cold War hostility. The Olympics became a staging ground for international rivalries, with U.S. athletes doing their patriotic best to beat Soviet bloc countries and show which political and economic system was superior. Athletes, whether they liked it or not, bore the weight of global power posturing.

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Science and Technology

Global Doc: Once Bitten

By Dr. Vincent DeGennaro Jr ’02

Over 55,000 people die of rabies every year, the majority from dog bites in Africa and Asia. Haiti allegedly has one of the highest rates of prevalence in the Western Hemisphere. However, much like all health issues in Haiti, the dearth of available data makes it impossible to know the true pervasiveness of the disease.

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Society and Culture

We Are Hope-Brokers in Hell

By Antonio Anderson, SOLT, ’85

God is love, we learned in grade school catechism in Chicago or Houston or wherever we grew up, but here in the midst of a civil war in which, by some estimates, 100,000 Mexicans have been killed throughout the country in the last six years, it is essential to reiterate that revelation: God is love.

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Letter from Campus: Breakfast with Clarence Thomas

By Elizabeth Argue '14

“Have any of you ever worked in sugar cane fields? I have, and it is hard work. Education is everything.” I suddenly feel foolish. Sitting stiffly in a jacket, skirt and heels, I shake my head at his question. We all do. No, I have never even seen a field of sugar cane.

The eight undergraduates at breakfast are fellows in the Tocqueville Program for Inquiry Into Religion and American Public Life. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is teaching at the Notre Dame Law School for a week, and he agreed to meet us before his class.…

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