News » Archives » January 2004

An Amazing Tale of Real World Connections

By Liz Warren

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When an up-and-coming screenwriter and a popular actor meet on a film location in Japan, their rapport quickly leads to friendship. Amazement ensues when the two discover they have more in common than a mutual fondness for film trivia and an appreciation for the well-turned phrase.…

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Momotombo Press

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

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Francisco Aragon, a fellow at Notre Dame’s Institute for Latino Studies and a 2003 graduate of the MFA program at Notre Dame, is the founding editor and director of Momotombo Press. The press, which supports emerging Latino/a writers, is named after a volcano in Nicaragua. Aragon recently moved the press from Davis, California, to Notre Dame. This fall the press debuts in its new home with the publication of Arroyo

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The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name, p. 2

By Readers

_Editor's note: The following letters were received through the magazine's React Online form and from those written or emailed to the magazine._ "Page 1":/news/10626, "Page 3":/news/10628, "Page 4":/news/10629, "Page 5":/news/10630 It is with regret that I hereby request that you remove my name from your list of subscribers. I have for many years enjoyed keeping up with goings on at Notre Dame through the magazine. Your current issue, however, sadly demonstrates an editorial philosophy that I cannot find edifying and must protest against.

I am greatly disturbed by Mr. Temple's statement in his editor's note that: "Homosexuality is . . . a fascinatingly rich subject that gets into human nature, love and sexual attraction; brings together science, psychology, sociology and religion; that involves family, morality and cultural mores; that raises questions of Catholic doctrine and the individual's conscience."…

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The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name, p. 3

By Readers

_Editor's note: The following letters were received through the magazine's React Online form and from those written or emailed to the magazine_ "Page 1":/news/10626, "Page 2":/news/10627, "Page 4":/news/10629, "Page 5":/news/10630 Finally, some diversity in an otherwise secular, mundane and pandering magazine. This is the first issue I actually read cover to cover. Some of the other online comments prove that the hate, prejudice and disdain that gay people face every day is real. I find it unfortunate that these comments come from supposedly well-educated Christian alum. Gay students have always been and always will be a part of the ND community. Not acknowledging them will not make them go away. This issue should have been published 20 years ago.

Mark Bomber '86
Denver, Colorado…

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The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name, p. 4

By Readers

_Editor's note: The following letters were received through the magazine's React Online form and from those written or emailed to the magazine_ "Page 1":/news/10626, "Page 2":/news/10627, "Page 3":/news/10628, "Page 5":/news/10630 Special thanks for your series of stories in the summer _ND Magazine_. It came on a very poignant day for me. One year ago on an equally beautiful Saturday my youngest son sat on my porch to tell me that he "liked boys."

These articles helped me reflect on this last year. A year of great growth for all of us while remaining the same.…

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The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name, p. 5

By Readers

_Editor's note: The following letters were received through the magazine's React Online form and from those written or emailed to the magazine_ "Page 1":/news/10626, "Page 2":/news/10627, "Page 3":/news/10628, "Page 4":/news/10629 Thank you for publishing this wonderful issue—especially the piece "God Gave me a Gay Son." It is a remarkable journey that this father traveled, and I am so impressed that you published it and shared it with everyone in the ND family. Please pass along my thanks to the author, Thomas Nelson.

Shelly Scheuring '85
Anthem, Arizona…

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The Hotspots of Invasion

By John Monczunski

The attacks happen every day all across the world. An ocean-going freighter takes on ballast water at Port A, then later discharges its tanks at Port B, injecting alien creatures from the A ecosystem into the B ecosystem. Anywhere from 7,000 to 10,000 different species may be floating in a ship’s ballast water, explains David Lodge, Notre Dame professor of biology. “…

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Marketing's moral myopia

By John Monczunski

The vegetable soup was chock full of good things to eat. Unfortunately, the good things were at the bottom of the bowl, invisible. The photographer for the print ad, however, had a novel solution: He put marbles in the bowl, forcing the veggies to the surface. No one saw a problem with the sleight of hand, and thus was born one of the classics of deceptive advertising. The Federal Trade Commission filed and won a lawsuit, and Campbell Soup Company was left with egg on its face.…

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Digging Back in Time

By John Monczunski

A group of Notre Dame students and area volunteers dug into local history this summer—literally. Led by anthropology professor Mark Schurr, the group worked a 16-square-meter archaeological dig along the banks of the Kankakee River in northwest Indiana. The project yielded hundreds of artifacts dating as far back as 800 B.C. The Notre Dame archaeologist termed the site the richest he has found in 14 years of work in the area.…

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Seminar: Would You Like Soy with That?

By John Monczunski

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Neil Shay is a Notre Dame associate professor of biological sciences who studies the biochemical mechanisms involved in nutrition and metabolism. Currently he is researching the effect of soy foods and isoflavones on cholesterol levels. Recently we asked him if it is true that you are what you eat.…

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Checkback: Taco Bell

By Ed Cohen

Did the University decide to sever its ties with Taco Bell, as requested by a student group backing a national boycott?

Yes.

Last spring members of the Progressive Student Alliance staged hunger strikes and organized other efforts aimed at convincing the University not to renew a sponsorship agreement with local Taco Bell restaurants.…

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Checkback: Assault lawsuit

By Ed Cohen

What happened with the lawsuit filed against the University by the parents of a student who accused four football players of rape?

In June a Saint Joseph County Superior Court judge dismissed the portion of the lawsuit against Notre Dame.

The 22-year-old woman and her parents filed the suit in April seeking an unspecified amount of damages from the University and from four former Notre Dame football players whom she said raped her at the home of one of the players in 2002.…

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Letters from print issue

By Readers

Charges

A brief item in the news section noted that the library is discontinuing 1,500 electronic journal subscriptions and print versions of another 1,000 journals due to a budget crisis. It seems the publishers of the journals, according to the article, "have a captive audience and raise subscription rates faster than inflation." An article on the very next page reports that Notre Dame's tuition next year will jump to $36,930—a 6.9 percent increase. In fact, since my senior year (1977) tuition has increased more than 700 percent. It would appear the administration also has a captive audience and has no qualms about raising tuition rates faster than inflation. In fact, everything—television contracts, football tickets, books, fees, bookstore items, parking permits, etc.—is priced according to what the market will bear. It is hypocritical of Notre Dame to complain when the University takes the same approach.…

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Letters to the Editor Web extra

By Readers

Editor's note: Letters about the summer issue cover package "The Love that Dare Not Speak Its Name" are available at http://magazine.nd.edu/news/10626/

Farewell to some good men

Wow!—I've just finished reading for a second and slow time the beautiful eulogy on Father Edmund P. Joyce, CSC- in the summer 2004 issue. What a Notre Dame man! Thank you so much for selecting a quality writer and contemporary of Father Joyce, Richard Conklin, to prepare the eulogy.

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The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name, p. 1

By Readers

_Editor's note: The following letters were received through the magazine's React Online form and from those written or emailed to the magazine._ "Page 2":/news/10627, "Page 3":/news/10628, "Page 4":/news/10629, "Page 5":/news/10630 My reaction to your "homosexuality package" is overwhelmingly favorable. Here are a few comments that I delivered to an 50th anniversary alumni reunion shortly before your package appeared. These comments continue to reflect my views today.

***…

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One lake or two?

By Ed Cohen

People who know Notre Dame’s full name is Notre Dame du Lac, know the layout of campus, and know a little French are often perplexed as to why the University’s name translates to “Our Lady of the Lake.” After all there are two lakes.

Many a smug Domer will explain that there used to be one lake. They’ll tell you that sometime in the 19th century the State of Indiana decided to confiscate all lakes larger than a certain size. To keep from losing one of Notre Dame’s lakes to secular authority, Father Sorin had the brothers fill in a shallow area between the lakes, turning Our Lady’s one big, potentially public lake into two smaller private ones.…

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Bridget's obliterated

By Ed Cohen

The bar near campus that became synonymous with underage drinking before it became a coffee shop has now become . . . a vacant lot.

The University purchased the former Molly McGuire’s Coffee House after it closed last summer and demolished it earlier this year. Also torn down was its neighbor across Eddy Street, the former offices of Shilts Graves & Associates Inc., an engineering firm. The University purchased that property in 2002.…

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What's wrong with Rudy?

By Emily Paladino '05

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photoAsk a Domer how many times he or she has seen the 1993 movie Rudy and the answer is likely to be “many.” But it’s unlikely that viewers have discovered all of the film’s historical inaccuracies, errors in continuity and production gaffes in the film based on the real-life football exploits of Rudy Ruettiger ‘76.…

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Designing Irish take aim at purses, countertops, landfills

By Ed Cohen

The world is looking to Notre Dame students for coins, waste baskets and maybe even the next great washing machine.

Earlier this year, an art design student took first place in a national competition with his idea for a self-bagging waste-basket system. The United States Mint selected a senior majoring in marketing and art to help design future coins. And Electrolux, the world’s largest household appliance maker, picked Notre Dame’s Department of Art, Art History and Design to represent the United States in an international industrial design competition.…

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Grotto: You write, he lights

By Emily Palladino '05

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No matter what time of year, even when the campus is deserted, scores of candles can be seen blazing in the Grotto.

It’s no miracle, just the magic of mail-order and the devotion of an 86-year-old Holy Cross brother.

When people write to the University asking that a candle be lit at the Grotto for some special intention, Brother James Lakofka, CSC

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Teaching tact to doctors

By Tom Tiberio '05

Ruth Hillebrand found out she was dying after a physician called her Manhattan apartment late one night.

It was a rare form of cancer—mesothelioma. The disease had no treatment and no cure, the doctor told her bluntly. Then he hung up.

Unbeknownst to the physician, Hillebrand was living alone at the time with no one to talk to and no one to comfort her after receiving the news. She passed away on June 17, 1994, at age 67.…

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Hall portrait: Zahm

By Emily Paladino '05

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STRONG>Year Built: 1937

Capacity: 237

Male or Female? Always male.

They call themselves: Zahmbies, although the hall’s sports teams are called Rabid Bats.

Named for: Father John Augustine Zahm, CSC. After graduating in 1871, Zahm remained at Notre Dame to teach chemistry, physics and natural science. He was regarded as a captivating lecturer and brilliant scholar and rose to director of the science department in 1875 and to vice president of the University in 1884. Zahm designed the new science facility that opened in 1884; the building now houses the LaFortune Student Center. He left Notre Dame in the late 1890s to travel to Rome and received an honorary Ph.D. from Pope Leo XIII

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Custodian joins university immortals on ND Wall of Honor

By Ed Cohen

The Wall of Honor in the ground floor hallway of the Main Building celebrates such people as Father Sorin, Father Hesburgh, Knute Rockne. And now it honors the building’s former janitor.

Earlier this year, the names and likenesses of three more individuals were added to the wall: legendary band director Joseph Casasanta ‘23, who wrote the alma mater and “Hike Notre Dame” and other football songs; Helen H. Hosinski, secretary to Hesburgh from 1943 to 1990; and Curry Montague, principal custodian of the Main Building from 1970 to 2000.…

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Roomies

By Walton Collins '51

Boarding an early morning flight out of South Bend’s airport a dozen or so years ago, I slipped into my aisle seat, unfolded my newspaper and began reading. Pretty soon I realized the man sitting next to me was staring at me intently. “Hello, Walt Collins,” he said. “Remember me?”

I didn’t. Possibly because of the early hour, nothing about this middle-age man rang a bell. I was about to fumble through an apology when he added: “We were roommates.”…

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A Child's Garden of Versions

By Jessica Low Martinez

“Miss, are children in America like us?” The question caught me off guard. I looked at the sea of dark faces staring intently at me and paused, knowing that the subject had to be broached carefully. The last thing I wanted to do was reinforce their negative views. Influenced by the biased British media and the negative attitudes in their homes, my students had great difficulty reconciling what they thought they knew about Americans with the American that stood in front of them every day. Normal me. Neither valley girl nor warmonger, I was beyond perplexing.…

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The Singing One

By Sue Marquette Poremba

My earliest memory from church is singing the simple hymn “Jesus Loves Me” with my brother and sister. We were raised in my grandparents’ Methodist church, where my grandmother was the Sunday School teacher. Each Christmas featured the children’s pageant, and I remember standing there with my siblings, staring at the floor, mumbling the words.…

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A Place That Was

By James Behrens

At night as I fall off to sleep, I sometimes think of what transpired in the day. Last night I thought of something my mom recently told me. She has trouble sleeping some nights. She cannot see well so she does not watch late night television, and the radio brings her no comfort. She lies in bed and thinks about things. She avoids as best she can those troubling thoughts that can loom large in the night. She told me that she thinks of good things, warm things that make her happy. She said she thinks of days many years ago when she went to the beach. She liked the beach, she told me. And thinking about it makes her feel good.…

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Rear View Window to the World

By Robert Joe Stout

A free education in rural Wyoming half-a-century ago meant that children under 16 were supposed to go to school every day. They also were supposed to return home from school and during the interim to cause as little disruption as possible. That many of these children weren’t particularly keen about learning to read well, or multiply and divide, or remember who crossed the Delaware and who wintered at Valley Forge quickly became apparent to the teachers who were trying to educate them.…

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The Eye of the Needle: Katharine Drexel

By Anthony Walton '82

At the 1975 canonization of Elizabeth Seton, the first American-born saint, Pope Paul VI remarked that the “temporal prosperity” of the United States seems “to obscure and make almost impossible” the renunciation of self and dedication to religion traditionally found in the lives of those canonized by the Catholic church. The material temptations of the “good life” as well as the complex work, social and familial situations of this fast-paced nation seem to leave little space for spiritual cultivation of any kind—let alone of sufficient magnitude to qualify for sainthood. Katharine Drexel, the second native-born American so honored by the church, faced the challenges of “temporal prosperity” to such extremes as to make her canonization perhaps the most unlikely of all.…

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Death in the family: Robert Vacca

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The campus lost a committed champion of the underdog in June when ROBERT A. VACCA passed away at age 63. Former students will remember Vacca, who joined the classics department faculty in 1969, as a compassionate and inspiring teacher, someone who could gently correct or change one’s way of thinking without criticizing or humiliating. A specialist in classical Greek language, literature and philosophy, he won the Arts and Letters college’s highest teaching honor, the Sheedy Award, in 1973 and a universitywide Kaneb Award for teaching excellence in 2002. He belonged to a vanishing species: faculty who could obtain tenure by virtue of their teaching ability rather than in combination with published research. As it was, he rose only to the rank of assistant professor. As a friend and former colleague explained it, he was a gifted scholar and Socratic thinker, someone who would engage anyone intellectually, “but just like Socrates, he didn’t write it down.” Instead of publishing he focused on teaching and social justice advocacy, which grew out of his admiration for classical democratic ideals. Last fall while on leave because of his illness, he gave an invited lecture on campus about Athenian democracy in which he described the Athenians’ sense of a place they all shared. He noted that in their world, industrial pollution would have been inconceivable because no one would think of damaging the common space. Vacca was among the most influential members of the editorial board of Common Sense,

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