News » Archives » March 2004

Catholicism not the only religion on campus

By Joanna Mikulski '03

Notre Dame’s Catholic identity can make it difficult for non-Catholics to find a place to express their faith. Traditionally only Roman Catholic worship services are held on campus on Sundays.

But contrary to popular belief, Catholicism does not hold a monopoly on campus worship.

Muslims pray every Friday in the nondenominational prayer room in the Coleman-Morse Center, the multipurpose facility built on the site of the former bookstore. And every Wednesday night at 10, in the chapel of men’s dorm Morrissey Manor, Catholic and Protestant students pray together at Interfaith Christian Night Prayer.…

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Great coach, not-so-great novelist

By Colleen Ganey '03

With a minute and 30 seconds to go and trailing by one point, Dulac University faces fourth-and-10 at the 40-yard line of State University.

Quarterback Elmer Higgins switches out of the punt call and instead shoots a “bullet-like pass” to his wide receiver, who evades the oncoming tackler and darts over the goal line. Dulac has beaten the odds again, and Elmer has proven to his detractors that smarts can transform 135 pounds of heart into an athletic weapon.

So ends The Four Winners—the Head—the Hands—the Foot—the Ball, the first and, as far as anyone knows, only novel written by Knute Rockne.

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NDTV on Cable

By Ed Cohen

Notre Dame students now have their own TV show.

NDTV, a biweekly half-hour magazine-format program, premiered last October on South Bend’s public access cable Channel 3. New shows debut every other Tuesday night at 10 with reruns the following two Thursdays at 5 p.m.

As in most cities, programming on South Bend community access is typified by poor picture quality, irritating sound and a succession of people reading Bible verses into the camera. “One of our first episodes was pre-empted by a spelling bee,” says junior Lance Johnson, one of NDTV’s four student executive producers.…

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NDbay bypasses bookstore

By Ed Cohen

Given the Internet and students’ near-universal displeasure with what the bookstore charges for textbooks and pays for sell-backs, something like this was bound to happen.

In December two sophomores launched an online textbook-trading website, NDbay.com. In its first buy-sell period—the end of fall semester and start of spring—the site generated about 300 sales, said one of its creators, Chris Kelly.…

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ND's 14th Rhodes Scholar

By Susie Schaab '03

Senior Andrew Serazin has been many places the past four years: West Africa to research malaria; Tucson, Arizona, to live in the Biosphere; Johannesburg, South Africa, to attend a United Nations’ summit on sustainable development.

Next fall he’ll settle down for at least two years in England when he becomes Notre Dame’s 14th Rhodes Scholar.

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Weathering the Economy

By Ed Cohen

“Notre Dame’s Investments Quarterback Takes His Team Into the Record Books,” a headline in the Wall Street Journal’s September 13, 2000, issue declared.

Underneath, in a feast of football metaphors that surely made promoters of Notre Dame’s academic aspirations gag, the story marveled at the 57.9 percent return on the University’s endowment investments for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2000. A year “worthy of a Heisman,” the writer called it. The rate was tops among university endowments.…

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Seen and Heard, web extra

By Ed Cohen

Athletic director Kevin White, now beginning his fourth year on the job, received a two-year contract extension. His original five-year contract had already been extended five years and now reaches to 2012. Notre Dame was the only school last fall to qualify all six of its teams for NCAA tournament play or a football bowl game. After the fall sports the Irish stood third in the standings for the all-sports Directors’ Cup. . . . Women’s volleyball coach Debbie Brown received the NCAA

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A Death in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

As a young man living in the Netherlands during the Nazi occupation BERNARD S. WOSTMANN felt and saw the effects of food shortages personally. After the war he would study the body’s responses to under-nutrition, as opposed to malnutrition, and report that there were actually health benefits to eating less than one wanted. The immigrant, who conducted research and taught graduate students about biology and nutrition at Notre Dame for more than 30 years, died last December at age 84. Wostmann came to the United States as a Rockefeller Research Fellow at the California Institute of Technology in 1950. At Caltech he worked under, among others, chemist Linus Pauling, who in a few years would receive the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. In 1955 Wostmann moved to Notre Dame, living initially in a cottage in Vetville, the campus housing area for married war veterans. He had been hired as a researcher for the University’s Lobund Laboratory, famous for its development of a line of rats free from bacteria. The isolation made the animals valuable for testing biological responses absent of interference from other organisms. Wostmann worked extensively on the nutritional requirements of the germ-free rats, eventually developing a diet now considered standard for lab animals. In one project, growing out of his war-time experience, he found that if rats were fed only 70 percent of their normal caloric intake (but all the vitamins and minerals they needed), they were actually healthier, if ill-tempered. Tall, dignified and self-assured, Wostmann became a researcher-missionary of sorts for Lobund, spreading the gospel of germ-free animal research or “gnotobiology” at conferences and institutions the world over. He retired in 1988 and relocated to Texas to be near family but remained connected to Lobund.…

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Seen and Heard

By Ed Cohen

Father George Rozum, CSC, may have taken his second-last ride in a coffin. Rozum ‘61, ’80MSA has been rector of Alumni Hall since 1979 and for many years was a central figure in a bizarre ritual associated with the hall’s signature springtime event, the Alumni Wake. Originally a commemoration of the much-disputed 1978 decision banning kegs in dorms, the Wake grew into an annual week-long series of festivities culminating in a dance in the hall’s basement. The rector would arrive at the dance at midnight, carried in from the hall chapel inside a coffin. New rules aimed at curbing abusive drinking have put an end to all in-hall dances, and apparently the coffin ritual also has been laid to rest. Student Affairs officials and Father Rozum agreed that it was time to change the character and demeanor of the event. As of February ideas were still being discussed as to what form this year’s Wake would take and whether to bury the coffin. . . . It was the greatest mile race ever run at Notre Dame, maybe the greatest anywhere. Senior Luke Watson won the Meyo Mile at the annual Meyo Invitational meet in the Loftus Sports Center in early February in a time of 3:57.83. It was only the second sub-four-minute mile ever run by a Notre Dame athlete, breaking Chuck Aragon’s school record of 3:59.9 set in 1981. More amazing, the top five finishers in the race all broke four minutes and posted what were at that date the five fastest indoor mile times in the world in 2003. The times were so good that any one of them would have won last year’s NCAA

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Colleges and universities more expensive than ND

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

*Total student charges 2002-03 Institution Total charges*
Sarah Lawrence College $39,370
New York University $37,052
George Washington University $36,930
Columbia College of Columbia University, $36,752
University of Chicago $36,552
Tufts University $36,465
Boston University $36,390
Brown University $36,356
Georgetown University

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Applications to ND Way Up

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

More than 12,000 students applied for admission to Notre Dame this year, surpassing by 19 percent the record set three years ago. Daniel Saracino, assistant provost for enrollment, attributed the increase to several factors: increased availability of financial aid, stepped up visits by admissions officers to high schools, more students and high school counselors visiting campus, expanded summer programs on campus for high school students, and the positive image projected by first-year football coach Tyrone Willingham, the first black head coach in any sport at Notre Dame. Perhaps due to publicity about Willingham, applications from minority students rose about 45 percent this year. Students of color have accounted for about 17 percent of Notre Dame’s student body in recent years. Next fall they might reach 20 percent for the first time, Saracino said. The University admits about 3,200 applicants and expects about 1,960 to accept and enroll. Decision letters were to be mailed by April 1. Notre Dame, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Stanford, Dartmouth, Brown, MIT

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ND backs affirmative action in admissions

By Ed Cohen

Notre Dame joined 37 private colleges and universities in a legal brief supporting the University of Michigan’s affirmative action policies. The polices, opposed by President Bush, were being challenged in a case before the U.S. Supreme Court. Said Father Malloy: “At Notre Dame we believe it is imperative that our incoming classes reflect, as much as possible, the diversity of our nation, and we feel that our mix of students from all over the U.S. and the world adds to the educational experience.”…

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Heading off hemophilia in the womb

By John Monczunsk

A team of biologists and chemists has developed a technique that promises to head off hemophilia before birth.

Led by Elliot D. Rosen, associate director of Notre Dame’s W.M. Keck Center for Transgene Research, researchers from the Keck Center and ND’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry succeeded in transferring liver cells into mouse embryos that lacked the ability to produce an essential blood-clotting protein.…

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Mom and I buy only . . .

By John Monczunski

Blood is not only thicker than water, it also appears to be stronger than coupons, celebrity endorsements and other product marketing devices. A study by marketing faculty Elizabeth S. Moore and William L. Wilkie along with a colleague at the University of Florida found that mothers pass down powerful preferences to their daughters for certain brand-name products. The researchers separately surveyed about 100 mothers and their college-age daughters to see which brands of household products they most preferred to purchase. The matches were then adjusted to see which items were popular beyond what their market share would predict. The following are the products that appeared to benefit most from what the researchers term “intergenerational influences”:

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Wondering Out Loud: Why did Japan attack Pearl Harbor?

By Ed Cohen

Japan became a rising world power with its victory in the 1905 Russo-Japanese War, but the country felt increasingly at a disadvantage economically and politically as European powers and the United States raced into China and other parts of Asia to establish colonies and trade relationships. Japanese society turned more and more militaristic and nationalistic, culminating in an invasion of Manchuria in 1931 and brutal incursions into other parts of China in 1937.…

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Web extra letters

By Readers

Domers error
I was pleased to see my uncle’s name, Creighton Miller, in the Winter 2002-03 issue under “Domers in the News.” My uncle was a very special person, dear to many Notre Dame alumni. I was saddened, however, to note that the brief mention contained three mistakes. Creighton died in May 2002 (not April) —a small mistake. The other two mistakes are not so small. Creighton’s father, my grandfather, was Harry Miller ‘09 (the 1908 team captain you mentioned). Creighton’s uncle was Don Miller ’25, one of the Four Horsemen. (Three other uncles, Gerald, Walter and Ray also played football and graduated from Notre Dame.) The Four Horsemen are part of Notre Dame lore; in addition, the University markets their image on many items of apparel, sports memorabilia, etc. I do think that you could be expected to check your facts, and so keep their names straight.…

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Mystery of Freshman's Disappearance Ends Grimly

By Ed Cohen

Like most students, Chad Sharon was ready to unwind after the last day of fall semester classes.

Five days separated him from his first final exam. So around 11, when a group of guys from his dorm said they were driving to a party off campus and invited him along, the freshman hopped in the car.

By 1 a.m. his friends were ready to leave the party, which was at a house on Corby Boulevard, south of campus. The friends said Chad was still enjoying himself, so he declined a ride home. He said he would walk the five or six blocks back to campus. He assured them he knew the way.…

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Tricycling through Vetville

By Susan Allman-Carlo

The place was called Vetville—and it housed the influx of married World War II veterans attending Notre Dame. My parents, Redmond and Donnis Allman, lived in Unit 35 A for four-and-a-half years. During the l946-47 school year, 106 children were born to Vetville residents. I was one of them.

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Crossing of Destinies

By David S. Pollock

Father Julius Nieuwland, CSC, was cordial as we walked into his lab, even though he was playing hooky from a Notre Dame convocation.

He was wearing a heavy black rubber apron—curious for the man whose research in acetylene provided the key to developing synthetic rubber. The cigar he was smoking helped cut the pungent smell of the old chemistry building.…

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More than Zero

By Timothy J. Reid '75

The message on the envelope was stark but clear. “Return to sender: Deceased.” There had been no warnings, no rumors or calls from mutual friends, nor any reason to expect it. We had spoken just a month or two before, but I knew the notation was not an error. With a sick feeling in the pit of my stomach, I said a short “Hail Mary” for my friend, and called his parish in Olmsted Falls, Ohio, for confirmation. Yes, they said, it was true: Jim Brennan had died on Sunday, October 27, 2002.…

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Funny Things Happen on the Way to Growing Old

By John A. Lynch '44

Some days I lie in my hammock listening to the grass grow or watching the trees leaf out or the flowers bloom. Birds call and insects scratch on the bark of red pines, and in the cerulean sky above there are no airplanes or helicopters, only puffy, drifting clouds shaped like rabbits and bears and medieval castles, and far, far off, from ocean to ocean, a colorful freed balloon sails on. Until tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow.…

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A Wonder Full Life

By Juan De Pascuale

All of us are a little like Gulliver in Jonathan Swift’s masterpiece Gulliver’s Travels — sailing the sea of time in our fragile bodies, repeatedly finding ourselves shipwrecked on our voyage to the Unknown. In this parable of the human condition, Gulliver’s accidental voyages take him to strange worlds inhabited by odd creatures. Perhaps most bizarre is Laputa, the island world that floats like a Zeppelin in the sky high above the ground.…

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Fading Colors

By Sarah Childress '03

The first time I remember counting colors, I was about 7 or 8. Glancing around at the other kids in my swim class, I realized I was the only brown one. This was interesting and a little awkward for a girl so eager to fit in, but nobody else seemed to notice. As long as they weren’t bothered, I decided I was all right.…

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My Notre Dame

By Mel Tardy '86, '90MBA

The February snow swirled as I pulled into the driveway of Notre Dame’s Warren Golf Course clubhouse, trying to find a spot amid haphazardly parked cars. It was early evening. I had composition papers to grade and a class lesson to prepare. Only something special would have convinced me to come out with my schedule as full as it was. But this was something special. The African-American community had been invited to welcome new head football coach Tyrone Willingham and his staff.…

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L.A. Confidential

By Robert Cubbage

An hour into my interview with veteran Hollywood columnist James Bacon, it hits me—I can’t name one legendary star he doesn’t know like a close relative. I throw him a question about actor Robert Blake, who’s behind bars awaiting trial for killing his wife. “It’s hard to call that case,” muses the 88-year-old Bacon. “You really don’t know whether he is telling the truth or not. I met Blake when he was 16 years old. He talked like a young Richard Burton. Years later he got the television series, Baretta

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The Unseen Notre Dame

By Ed Cohen

“Shoot,” I said, remembering I’d left my pen down below with my notebook. I was standing in a sort of crow’s nest that hangs inside the Golden Dome directly beneath Mary’s two-ton, 16-foot-tall, hollow iron statue. My legs trembled faintly and I kept a hand clamped on anything solid and vertical as I stepped around the tiny platform. Gaps between some of the planks, I couldn’t help noticing, were wide enough to swallow a leg.…

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Bigger Than Winter: For Hugh E. Reilly '76

By Mickey Reilly

Thursday night
Sheraton Hotel, Chicago

Dear Hugh,

How is it possible, after a lifetime of friendship, that you have simply disappeared, my brother? I wander through my days searching for your grin, the way you cock your head when listening, the quality of your voice as singular as the swirls in your fingertips. I see your son, your wife, our parents, our siblings, your friends, and I recognize the look in their eyes, too.…

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