News » Archives » 2004

Music from ND graduates: The Stone Puppet CD and Josephine Cameron CDs

By Jennifer Osterhage '05

stonepuppet.jpg
Three alums are hoping to play their way to rock music success. The Stone Puppet, a Chicago-based rock band, features lead singer John Tabis ‘00, guitarist Dan Puccini ’00 and bassist Tom Hayes ’02, along with Dave Streets and Patrick Golarz. The band released its self-titled debut album of five original rock songs last year; a second album is due out this year. At Notre Dame, Tabis sang in the Glee Club, Puccini was the Student Union Board’s concert talent buyer, and Hayes participated in Jazz Band, Symphony Orchestra and Marching Band for four years. All three played in campus bands. “[W]e look at our ND experience as our minor league, where we were able to develop our music and marketing skills,” Tabis says. “So now on the larger level in Chicago, we have been able to use that experience to expose people on the local, regional and national levels to [our music].” With a combination of rock, pop and ballads, the band’s sound is a cross between Matchbox 20 and the Rolling Stones.…

Read More

Books in Print

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

A Journey with God in Time: A Spiritual Quest, John S. Dunne, CSC, ’51 (Notre Dame Press). Father Dunne’s autobiographical musings transport the reader on a spiritual journey through his life. Color photographs of Thomas Cole paintings serve to organize the book, carrying it through childhood, youth, adulthood and old age. The author’s relationship with his grandfather, his midlife struggle to decide between marriage and family or “a willingness to walk alone,” and his pilgrimages to Jerusalem are among the experiences he plumbs. The Notre Dame professor of theology ends the book with a song cycle that offers a poetic look as his “voyage of life.”…

Read More

Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

When Indiana Governor Frank O’Bannon collapsed and later died from a stroke last September, Lieutenant Governor Joe Kernan ’68 ascended to the governor’s post. Kernan, a former mayor of South Bend, had previously announced that he would not run to succeed O’Bannon, who was prevented from seeking another term because of term limits. He later reconsidered and announced he will seek the office in 2004. . . . Justice Department prosecutor* John Dion ‘68* is overseeing the investigation into whether a member of the Bush administration leaked the identity of an undercover CIA

Read More

Alumni Briefs

By Alumni Association

2004 Alumni Board Election

Candidates will be vying for seven seats on the Alumni Board. They are: Region 1—Amy Hirsh Guarino ’83, Danville, California, and Ray Riehle ’84, Orangevale, California; Region 6—Thomas M. McCabe ’87, Lake Bluff, Illinois, and J. Thomas McIntire ’56, Rockford, Illinois; Region 8—John G. Leicht ’74, Indianapolis, Indiana, and Richard Nussbaum ’74, ’77J.D., South Bend, Indiana; Region 9—Lonnie L. Luna ’78 Ph.D., Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and Modesto Ruggiero ’83, Cleveland, Ohio; Region 13—Robert M. Bertino Jr. ’85, Dallas, Texas, and Michael W. McDonald ’97EMBA, Mabank, Texas; Region 16—Thomas D. Lupo ’82, ’85J.D., Chicago, Illinois, and John E. Scully ’64, Riverside, Illinois; and Young Alumni—Robert Holcomb ’99, San Jose, California, and Gabriel J. Seaman ’98, Oakdale, Pennsylvania.…

Read More

The Laughing Irish: Three ND Comedians Say Being Funny Takes Serious Work

By Andrew S. Hughes '89, '95M.A.

Splat.

That’s what John Garrett ’98 felt one October afternoon as he left work. Splat. A bird had pooped on his head. “The next night I went to the open mike with it,” he says. “I just went on stage and talked about it. I didn’t even have a joke. I just wanted to say it out loud in front of a bunch of people.” That’s how it is for a stand-up comedian—every moment, even an embarrassing one, is fodder for material.

Read More

Letters to the Editor: web extra

By Readers

The Poet President

I read Jacqueline Vaught Brogan’s article on Father Charles L. O’Donnell (“Time and Again,” Autumn) with great interest. Although I am a relative of Father O’Donnell’s (my great-grandmother’s sister was his mother), I didn’t learn very much about him until many years after I graduated in 1968.…

Read More

What became of Notre Dame's lawsuit against the contractors on the stadium expansion?

By Ed Cohen

In September, 2003, a St. Joseph County Circuit Court judge approved a settlement of the many lawsuits that arose out of the stadium expansion completed in 1997. Terms of the settlement were not disclosed. Cracking concrete and other problems discovered after the stadium reopened required millions of dollars in repairs. In 1999 the University filed suit against project architect Ellebe Becket Inc. and the general contractor and construction manager Casteel Construction Corporation of South Bend. Those companies in turn sued more than a dozen subcontractors. Ellebe Becket had been Notre Dame’s primary architect for buildings for decades prior to the stadium expansion but reportedly has not done any work for the University since then.…

Read More

Trustees chair McCartan re-elected

By Ed Cohen

Cleveland lawyer Patrick McCartan ‘56, ’59J.D. was re-elected chair of the Board of Trustees, extending his tenure to 2007. He has been a trustee since 1989 and was elected board chair and a fellow of the University in 2000. McCartan is senior partner of the international law firm Jones Day and has been cited in surveys by The National Law Journal as one of the country’s most respected and influential lawyers.…

Read More

University gives $100K for architecture prize

By Joanna Mikulski '03

When city planner Léon Krier was awarded the first Richard H. Driehaus Prize for Classical Architecture last March, he received what is believed to be the largest cash prize ever given by Notre Dame to honor the achievement of a single individual: $100,000.

Although the University dispenses monetary awards in the forms of scholarships and endowed professorships, a University spokesman had no recollection of Notre Dame ever having given away a cash prize close to that amount. The annual Laetare Medal, honoring an American Catholic, has no cash award attached. The Notre Dame Award for Distinguished Public Service in Latin America, nearest equivalent to the Driehaus Prize, carries a cash award of $10,000 with an equal sum going to a Latin American charitable organization chosen by the recipient.…

Read More

Notre Dame arrives downtown at last

By Ed Cohen

In Notre Dame’s earlier years priests and brothers would patrol sections of downtown South Bend and drag students back to campus from areas deemed detrimental to their development.

Now the University has its own facility in the heart of the city.

Notre Dame Downtown opened in late October at 217 S. Michigan St. in a storefront that was once part of Robertson’s department store. It’s located across the street from the State Theatre and a few doors north of the landmark Dainty Maid Bake Shop.…

Read More

Notre Dame Prize to Brazil Presidents

By Ed Cohen

Brazil’s two most recent presidents were selected to receive the 2003 Notre Dame Prize for Distinguished Public Service in Latin America in recognition of the peaceful transition they worked to achieve between their administrations.

The award honors the leadership shown by President Luis Inacio Lula da Silva and his predecessor, Fernando Henrique Cardoso in the national election of 2002. The voting represented the first democratic transition between elected presidents in Brazil since the early 1960s.…

Read More

Irish Inquisition Plays Persecutor for Laughs, Enlightenment

By Ed Cohen

A black-robed Grand Inquisitor who interrogates “the summoned” from atop a tennis umpire’s chair.

A mute assistant who drinks what appears to be gasoline straight from the can and gets his math advice from a brick.

Speakers compelled to swear an oath on the Notre Dame football media guide—held between their knees.

These are all elements of the Irish Inquisition, an often zany, sometimes thought-provoking program that debuted on campus fall semester.

Read More

Improved economy spurs building resumption

By Ed Cohen

Jordan Hall of Science

The University ended its yearlong moratorium on new campus construction in a big way November 1, breaking ground on what will be the most expensive building in school history, a long-awaited science learning center just north of the Joyce Center on Juniper Road.

The $70 million Jordan Hall of Science, expected to be completed in summer 2006, will feature 40 undergraduate labs for biology, chemistry and physics, several large lecture halls, faculty offices, a greenhouse, an herbarium and an observatory.…

Read More

How is the emeritus professor who wounded in the August 2003 bombing of the U.N. headquarters in Baghdad doing?

By Ed Cohen

Read a story by Gil Loescher in the magazine’s spring 2004 issue.

Emeritus Professor of Political Science Gilburt Loescher, who was nearly killed in the bombing at the U.N. headquarters in Baghdad in August 2003, continues to recuperate in England.

He lost both of his legs above the knee, his right hand was badly damaged, and he spent weeks unconscious after the terrorist blast. But as of early December he was learning to walk on prosthetic legs and had even taken his first drive in a car equipped with hand controls. He and his family are keeping an online journal of his progress at caringbridge.org/pa/gilloescher/

Read More

Letters to the Editor: from print issue

By Readers

Affirmative Action

Ed Cohen’s article (“Admit by Numbers”) showcased Notre Dame’s endorsement of Michigan’s automatic point entitlement—one based solely upon race. But it did little to illustrate the irony of a Catholic university joining forces with contemporary, secular liberalism. This is the same socialist bedfellow that would eliminate faith-based education in this country, if not faith itself.…

Read More

Letter from Campus: The Playful Peacemaker

By Ed Cohen

Desmond Tutu is convinced that God has a great sense of humor. He said so in his talk last September in McKenna Hall, the Center for Continuing Education. But the Nobel Peace Prize winner from South Africa is pretty funny himself. Consider this bit of national self-deprecation:

“Have you heard about the spaceship South Africa plans to launch to land on the sun? People said, ’You’ll burn up long before it gets close.’ You think we are stupid? We’re going to launch it at night.’”…

Read More

Arthur Andersen refugees reflect on what went wrong

By Ed Cohen

Two Notre Dame alumni who held leadership positions with Arthur Andersen say mind-boggling corporate structures, pressure to keep earnings looking good to Wall Street, and negligent board directors all contributed to the wave of scandals that rocked the business world and toppled their long-venerated accounting firm at the turn of the 21st century.…

Read More

Take Your Conscience to Work: ND Business School Has Always Taught Ethics

By Ed Cohen

“We become the choices that we make,” declared the Saint Thomas Aquinas quote projected onto a screen in the front left corner of the room. It was there for the start of the third meeting of adjunct professor Bonnie Fremgen’s Introduction to Business Ethics class. And if any of the sophomores in the lecture room suspected it meant she was expecting them to make tough choices that day, they were right.…

Read More

The Ice Maker

By Andrew Malcolm

For many long adult years, winter was for me something to endure, a time of occasional beauty but mostly gloom, slush, slippery driving and shoveling.

Read More

Attack of the Aliens

By Erik Ness

Sitting in the stern of his sturdy gray lab boat, David Lodge is sexing crayfish.

Reaching into a white plastic bucket, he plucks a rusty crayfish from the tangled mass of scratching, frothing, gnawing crustaceans. The angry critter waves his pincers in futile menace as the Notre Dame ecologist applies his calipers with practiced ease.…

Read More

The Far Corners of God's Kingdom

By Nancy Mairs

I am not especially sanguine about humanity’s prospects. Our technological capabilities have now so far outstripped our moral development that it seems likely we really will blow ourselves up with nuclear devices or suffocate ourselves with petrol fumes or poison ourselves with chemical waste or do ourselves in by some means we haven’t yet devised.…

Read More

What's So Great About Notre Dame?

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

A list of ingredients—from then and now—that have made Notre Dame the special place it is.

The Golden Dome

Monk Malloy, the president, living in a single room in one of the oldest residence halls on campus

The band marching through campus, playing “The Victory March” late afternoon on a football Friday

Coeducation…

Read More

And Then There Were Three

By Tim Rogers '92

Please understand. I love my wife. And our marriage is an earthly manifestation of God’s love, especially after we had the counseling. But ever since the day we met, 13 years ago, on a ski trip to Swiss Valley, our relationship has been a competition—even though, as we learned in counseling, it is absolutely not a competition, because competitions produce winners and losers, and what would you rather do, be a winner or be married?…

Read More

Careers and Kids

By Cheever Griffin '90

It’s early in the morning. Really early. The kind of early familiar only to dairy farmers, medical residents and the amazingly peppy people who open up Starbucks. And, of course, the parents of small children.

Mine, a 2-year-old boy with curly hair the color of a pumpkin, is sitting on a couch in the den waiting for me to hand him his bottle of milk. I know, he still takes a bottle. Terrible. The pediatrician and my mother-in-law tell us so every chance they get.…

Read More

Love and Marriage

By Monica Yant Kinney ’93

Shortly before my wedding three years ago, my father sent me a photocopied page of advice titled “How To Be A Good Wife.” Supposedly, it came from a 1950s-era high school economics book. It might as well have been the Stone Ages.

“Take 15 minutes to rest so that you’ll be refreshed when he arrives” home from work, it said. “Touch up your makeup, put a ribbon in your hair.” It’s the least a good wife can do to “be a little gay and a little more interesting” than all the stiff suits he sees at the office.…

Read More

Growing Up

By Andrew McDonnell '00

After you graduate from college, you begin to realize that your chances to score touchdowns, to slam a basketball or to jai the alai are pretty much at an end. When you have the chance for just a sampling of that sort of glory, even in its most minute forms, you embrace it, you hold it tight, and then you sprint to the bathroom.…

Read More

The Old Gang

By Steve Myers '97

One of my college buddies has a photo documenting a top-secret mission during my freshman year at Notre Dame. Three of us, all residents of Alumni Hall, are kneeling in front of Dillon Hall next to a 3-foot-tall pyramid of industrial-sized toilet rolls —the bounty of a late-night operation in Dillon, Alumni’s rival.…

Read More

The Dating Game

By Paige Smoron Wiser '92

I honestly can’t think of any advice my mom gave me about dating. She’d pretty much let me muddle my way through, with an eyebrow raised here or there. That is, until I’d bring home a guy she really couldn’t stand. Then she’d let me know about it.

I remember one year when she took a photo of me with my high school homecoming date. The spot where he was standing was obscured by a mysterious black bar of undeveloped film, as if God—or Mr. Kodak himself—didn’t approve, either.…

Read More

The Price of Success

By Kate Wiltrout '95

During the saddest winter of my life, Tuesday nights were the closest I ever got to happy.

It was late 1998, and I was living temporarily with my parents, depression slowly strangling my existence.
I’d graduated three years earlier and had been working as a journalist. But when I returned to the States after two years overseas, the life I’d known began slipping away.…

Read More