News » Archives » May 2005

The Slippery Meaning of Ice

By Tim McNamara '98

It’s February, and I’m sneaking a pair of skates and a Sherwood into the trunk of my dad’s car. Snow flurries paint the driveway and frost the leafless maple trees in the front yard. I’m in between jobs, and I stare at the flakes twisting earthward, wishing this natural scene would help me gain some insight into the order of things. But this longing recedes when I blink and remember more immediate plans.

Read More

Notre Dame Student Media

By Ed Cohen

Scholastic

News magazine

Begun: 1867

Frequency: every other week while classes are in session

Size: 28 to 52 pages

Circulation: 7,100 distributed free on campus, 400 mailed subscriptions ($35/year)

Staff: 30-35

Salaries: $300 to $400 per semester for editors

Funding: Student Activities allocation plus some advertising and subscriptions…

Read More

Seen and Heard Around Campus

By Ed Cohen

February brought the second Notre Dame Queer Film Festival and the fourth performance of the _Vagina Monologues_ and plenty of talk about whether either event should take place at a Catholic university. Bishop John D'Arcy of the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend wrote letters criticizing both. Among those writing to _The Observer,_ some complained that the events promoted behaviors in conflict with Church teaching. Others defended free expression and free academic inquiry. The atmosphere was especially heated when the _Monologues'_ author, Eve Ensler, who was attending the performances at Notre Dame for the first time, went to the South Dining Hall for a luncheon and was reportedly met by about 15 protesters. The _Monologues_ is an episodic play based on the experiences of women interviewed by Ensler. Some of their often- explicit recollections are harrowing, many are intended to be humorous. Benefit performances take place internationally around Valentine's Day as part of efforts to raise awareness of issues like genital mutilation and other forms of violence against women. The film festival screened films by gay and lesbian artists and included two panel discussions with writers and directors. . . . The producers…

Read More

Seen and Heard web extra

By Ed Cohen

Ticket demand was expected to be so great for a February concert in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center by the New York Philharmonic that a hall administrator organized a ticket lottery. Make that lotteries. One lottery was for tickets set aside for faculty and staff, one for students, and one for members of the South Bend community. Tom Barkes, the center's director of audience advancement, said he sent out an e-mail on December 23 announcing the procedures and by Christmas Day had 610 responses. There were ultimately requests for more than 2,000 tickets. The concert hall holds 961. . . . According to a student…

Read More

Domer's Index

By Compiled by Ed Cohen

Number of campus buildings today: 136

Number in 1976: 91

Number in 1844: 5

Number of chapels on campus: 58

Number at Georgetown: 6

Number at Boston College: 5

Tuition and room and board this year: $36,930

Tuition and room and board next year: $39,552.

Tuition and room and board 1985-86: $10,291

Cost of attending an undergraduate course this year for one minute: $1.75…

Read More

Barred scholar resigns post

By Ed Cohen

Tariq Ramadan, the renowned Muslum scholar who was expected to begin teaching about peace at Notre Dame this past fall but couldn’t because the government wouldn’t let him into the country, officially resigned his appointment in December.

In a letter informing the University of his decision he cited stress on him and his family because of the uncertainty of their position. Ramadan, who lives in Switzerland, was hired to teach in the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and the classics department. But last August, after his furniture had already been shipped to South Bend, his visa was revoked by the State Department acting on a recommendation from the Homeland Security Administration. No specific information was provided to Ramadan or Notre Dame on the reasons for the revocation, except that it involved matters of “national security.”

Ramadan is considered highly influential among Muslims in Europe. He often writes and lectures about how Muslims can remain true to their religion and culture in the modern world.…

Read More

Spotlights

By Notre Dame Magazine

Smart waste

Corn cobs and other throwaway biomass material can rid contaminated wastewater of toxic metals, according to a study by Notre Dame’s Center for Environmental Science and Technology.

A team of investigators found that cobs left over from the production of animal feed and spillage remaining from the manufacture of ethanol from corn can effectively remove copper, lead, zinc and other potentially toxic metals from contaminated water, even in the presence of other metals.…

Read More

Wondering Out Loud

By Notre Dame Magazine

What’s this “envelope” people are always said to be “pushing”?

The first time many of us heard the expression “pushing the envelope” was in the movie The Right Stuff, based on Tom Wolfe’s 1979 book about the original NASA astronauts. Test pilot Chuck Yeager was said to be “pushing” or “pushing back” the “outside of the envelope” every time he tried to fly a plane at a record speed or altitude.…

Read More

Grit could be a roadside attraction

By Ed Cohen

When the catalytic converter debuted on automobiles in 1975, people everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

Here was a device that transformed exhaust pollutants like carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons into something similar to what people exhale — plant-nourishing carbon dioxide and water vapor.

Now comes word that as the converters age, they expel tiny amounts of the very materials that make them work. In high enough concentrations, these elements could pose a health risk. But they’re also so precious that an industry could well develop to sweep up the dirt and grit along roadways to recover trace amounts.…

Read More

Kung fu dream girls

By John Monczunski

Ever since the first “Aiiyeeeeeeeee-hah” echoed through a darkened theater in the 1970s, martial arts films have been wildly popular, especially with adolescent and college-aged males. But what about the way they portray women?

Wendy Arons, assistant professor of communications and theater, surveyed a sampling of kung fu films with an eye toward issues of femininity, violence and power. Her findings, published last year as a chapter of the book Reel Knockouts: Violent Women in Movies

Read More

Can't get enough of campus?

By Liquid error: internal

Next time you have a minute or 90 to spare – and a fast Internet connection – explore the Sights and Sounds section of the Notre Dame website.

Here’s some of what you’ll find:

- Eight 360-degree views of the God Quad, library reflecting pool, inside the Basilica and the Grotto, and other locations (requires a free downloadable browser plug-in).…

Read More

Hall Portrait: Badin

By Alyson Tomme '02

badin

Year Built: original section, 1897; two wings added in 1917.

Named for: Father Stephen Badin, 1768-1853, first Catholic priest ordained in America (1793). In the early 1830s Badin purchased the land that would become Notre Dame from the government and early settlers. He planned to use it as a base for his missionary work in the Ohio and Mississippi river valleys. In 1835 he sold the land to the bishop of Vincennes, in southern Indiana, for a modest amount with the expressed hope that a school be established at the location. In 1842 the bishop’s successor deeded the land to Father Edward Sorin, CSC

Read More

Student life focus of gallery exhibition

By Notre Dame Magazine

It wasn’t enough to get kicked out of Notre Dame in the 19th century. For several years expelled students had their foul deeds recorded for posterity in a large book.

That book is now on display at a museum in downtown South Bend as part of an exhibit on student life through the years.
Notre Dame: Reflections of Student Life

Read More

Terror scare bumps blimp's flight plans

By Walton R. Collins '51

At 4 in the afternoon of Friday, October 19, Jim Maloney sits at the controls of the Goodyear blimp, half a mile above and just south of Notre Dame Stadium.

Behind him in the cramped cab, Rich Morckl maneuvers the ship’s camera in its gyroscopic housing, holding the image rock-steady as the blimp lurches in a gust of wind. The camera is powerful enough to focus clearly on a player’s shoelaces, but Morckl is after bigger vistas today: Touchdown Jesus, the Golden Dome, colorful mid-October foliage, long views of campus. The footage will make glamour shots for use during tomorrow’s nationally telecast Notre Dame-USC

Read More

Engineering for beginners

By Ed Cohen

t’s a pleasant sunny October afternoon and the freshmen in Ed Maginn’s Engineering 111 class are out on the South Quad firing softballs at him. In a calculated way.

Read More

Tailgating crackdown riles students

By Alyson Tomme '02

The hot issue on campus fall semester was tailgating.

The University tried to curb binge drinking the mornings of home football games by inviting state and local police to join the campus Security Police in sweeps of the parking lots popular with tailgaters. They issued hundreds of citations for underage drinking and for violating a rule in du Lac

Read More

Seen and Heard

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The first football game after the September 11 attacks, a home game against Michigan State, featured a special pregame show. Father Malloy said a prayer, and the stands were filled with people holding paper American flags. Some in attendance wondered why the Irish weren’t on the field; Michigan State’s players and coaches were. It turned out that the athletic directors had agreed ahead of time to keep their teams off the field during the ceremonies, but at the last minute Michigan State’s coach decided his players should witness the spectacle. . . . Notre Dame sophomore Mickey Blum,

Read More

The Power of One Good Man

By John Monczunski

It’s a pleasant September Indiana evening, and Notre Dame’s Fall Banquet Season, which roughly coincides with the football season, is in full swing. About 150 of us have gathered beneath the white big top that rests behind the Morris Inn like a huge dollop of whipped cream. We are here to celebrate a good idea, the Andrews Scholars Program, and to remember a good man, Jim Andrews ’61, a co-founder of Universal Press Syndicate with his friend and business partner, John McMeel ’57, and the namesake of the program that provides scholarship funds to Notre Dame students engaged in summer service projects.…

Read More

Witnesses, rescuers, relief workers and others

By Notre Dame Magazine

Sophomore Tom Galvin‘s father, Thomas Galvin Sr., deputy chief of the New York fire department’s Division 3, was inside the Marriott hotel adjacent to the World Trade Center’s first-hit (north) tower and about to take command of operations in the south when the south tower collapsed. About 40 firefighters were in the hotel at the time, and he was among the 30 who escaped. . . . NBC

Read More

Deaths in the Family: September 11

By Notre Dame Magazine

On the planes

Peter A. Gay, son of Peter B. Gay ’35, was one of the 81 passengers aboard United Airlines Flight 11, which left Boston at 7:59 a.m. bound for Los Angeles and became the first plane flown into the World Trade Center, its north tower. A vice president of operations for Raytheon Company in Andover, Massachusetts, he had begun traveling weekly to California earlier last year on consulting work. In late October, against all odds, his body was discovered at Ground Zero, apparently thrown from the exploding airliner. He was 54 and left behind a wife, an 8-year-old daughter and two grown sons. . . . Father Francis E. Grogan, CSC

Read More

The campus in the wake of 9-11

By Ed Cohen

A giant hook and ladder truck from the South Bend Fire Department stood on the Main Quad in front of Walsh Hall and Sorin College. Parked nearby were an engine from the campus fire department and various other rescue vehicles. No sirens whooped in the twilight of an overcast fall day, though. The dominant sound was the pealing of bells from the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. There was no fire, either. And no firefighters to be seen.…

Read More

Web extra - Letters to the editor

By Notre Dame Magazine

Anti-Bush objection out of place

I was disappointed in my fellow alumni when I read the letters in your autumn issue objecting to George W. Bush as commencement speaker. Intellectual freedom means, I hope, tolerance for differing points of view. It is intellectual snobbery of the worst kind to condemn the University for inviting the President of the United States to speak simply because one finds aspects of his record or his presumed views personally objectionable. If a commencement speaker is, as these writers suggest, supposed to represent the views of the University then who is to determine what those views are and whether a speaker meets the test? A great University like Notre Dame is made so in part by its diversity. I suspect that at least as many alumni voted for President Bush as voted for others. I personally am proud that Father Malloy invited him as commencement speaker. Since September 11th we have seen the true measure of President Bush’s leadership, and I think the University deserves credit and praise for having invited him.…

Read More

Letters

By Notre Dame Magazine

Please define ‘need’

“Generations of Students” (Autumn 2001) contains several references to the “demonstrated financial need” of the undergraduate students. This phrase has become extremely popular in official publications in the past couple of years. I have checked with various sources, and no one seems to know how “demonstrated financial need” is calculated. I have worked with several students from our area and they all argue vehemently that the “demonstrated financial need” is an arbitrary number. Before Notre Dame is allowed to pat itself on the back for meeting the “demonstrated financial need” of the undergraduates, it should be required that the administration explain how those needs are calculated. If the formula is changed each year, based upon admissions and available money, that fact should be disclosed. To do otherwise is to mislead students, graduates, donors and applicants on the availability of financial aid.…

Read More

Taking a Leap with Sheldon

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

When Dave Kellett ‘96, drew the Four Food Groups of the Apocalypse comic strip for The Observer, his favorite character was Sheldon, a child prodigy who also was enrolled at Notre Dame. Kellett graduated, and so did 10-year-old Sheldon. Now the title character in Kellett’s online strip, Sheldon has become the second-richest person in America through his own software company. He’s also invented a talking duck.…

Read More

A Man with a Mission

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

sorin

He’s known fondly by long-time Notre Dame staffers as “Eddie Freddie.” Whether Father Edward Frederick Sorin, CSC, who lived from 1814 to 1893, would have approved of this lighthearted name is difficult to judge, but the founder of Notre Dame most certainly was an exuberant man who fit in well with the fledgling spirit of the new frontier called America.…

Read More

A Sigh for Grown-up Children

By Sonya Booth

“You know, we’re orphans,” I told my brother. I said it like a joke, which is the best way to say serious things. And really, it is kind of a joke. My brother is 59. He’s a burly trucker. I’m 46. My sister is 52. We’re big and strong and brave. We never cry; we don’t whine. We make our beds, then lie in them. We’re responsible.…

Read More

This Is What Families Do

By Ed Cohen

I could tell the hug came as a surprise. Dad had just given one to my wife, Sue, as usual, and I was next through the door. He extended a hand to shake in our usual in-from-out-of-town greeting. But I put my arms around him instead, and squeezed, and held him for just a second. I didn’t say why, and he didn’t ask. But he had to know.…

Read More

A Threat of House Calls

By John O'Neil

Teresa had just started the breakfast dishes when she heard the scraping of gravel and muffled alien accents in the yard between the front of the house and the old barn. It was 10 o’clock, but Mary had been a holy terror and Teresa had only now put her down.

She knew straight away it was soldiers. The farm was only six miles from the border and they were forever about. “Like the poor, they are with us always,” Joe’s mother liked to say. They would have come on foot through the fields. The Army no longer moved by lorry in the northern Ireland county of Fermanagh.…

Read More

A Wing and a Prayer

By Jake Page

“She’ll be fighting mad,” the healer said. She had broken both her radius and ulna, or what we think of as the forearm, and the healer had set it and waited several months for it to knit itself back together. Now it was time for her to go back into the world, and it fell to my wife Susanne and me to accompany her. She was a red-tailed hawk.…

Read More