News » Archives » June 2005

Library auditorium renamed for landmark benefactor

By Notre Dame Magazine

The renovated Hesburgh Library auditorium has been renamed for William J. Carey ’46 of Dallas, whose $16 million benefaction, received last year, stands as the largest estate gift in Notre Dame history.

Half of the Carey gift is being used to help finance a long-term renovation of the library, beginning with the basement. Other portions of the benefaction have been used to establish a scholarship fund in his memory and to assist the Erasmus Institute, which sponsors scholarship grounded in the Catholic intellectual tradition.…

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Hall Portrait: Sorin

By Notre Dame Magazine

sorin

Year Built: original section, 1888; wings, 1897; porch, 1905

Named for: Notre Dame founder Father Edward Sorin, CSC.

Capacity: 154 (third-smallest)

Male or Female: Always a men’s dorm

They Call Themselves: Screaming Otters or just Otters

Distinguishing features: Giraffe-friendly ceilings on three upper floors (19 feet on the first) with huge rooms in four corner turrets; large front porch with dual swings, one of them reserved for smokers (as is half the porch); mixed-blessing proximity to Sacred Heart Basilica (bells).…

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The Impact of the Generations Campaign

By Kerry Temple ’74

Salvatore J. LaPilusa ‘41 came to South Bend from Bayonne, New Jersey, as a freshman in the fall of 1937. It was his first time away from home. His father, a bricklayer, had come to America in 1912; his mother, a seamstress, had come in 1914. Young Sal traveled alone by train to the Midwestern city, then took the trolley up the hill from downtown. “Seeing the dome,” he recalls, “made my heart pound faster.” He checked into freshman hall, roomed with a kid from Denver in a hothouse little cubicle with steel bunks and no chairs. Sal wanted to be a doctor. The tuition that year, he figured, was $25 per week — his father’s weekly pay. His two older sisters worked to help get Sal through school.…

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Playing Around: Letter from campus

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

shakfest

It’s a clear July Saturday morning, and on a grassy area just south of the Hesburgh Library reflecting pool, two young men practice the thrust and parry of swordplay. As I watch, a young woman in a long medieval gown accosts me. “Wouldst thou like a potion?” she asks, smiling, “a love potion?” I shake my head no. “Then perhaps,” she says, taking a critical look at me, “a beauty

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine

Mike Ferguson ’91 was elected to Congress for the first time in the November 2000 elections. He represents north-central New Jersey’s 7th District. . . . H. David Prior ’69J.D. was selected by President Bush to be general counsel in the Department of Housing and Urban Development. . . . Ann Laine Combs ’78

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Seen and Heard

By Notre Dame Magazine

Is Notre Dame becoming the place to go? The University had to add instructors and sections of core classes this fall because of a surprise windfall of freshmen. The Class of 2005 was expected to number 2,035 — the largest ever — because a record 61 percent of admitted applicants elected to enroll. All universities admit more applicants than they have room for because they know many will choose to enroll elsewhere (or nowhere). The percentage of admitted students who actually enroll is called the “yield.” Notre Dame’s yield has been climbing gradually the past six years, from 49 percent in 1995 to 57 percent in 2000. A 58 percent yield was forecast for this year. The surprise jump to 61 percent resulted in an unanticipated 100 extra freshmen. Enough dorm space existed to accommodate them all (with study lounges converted to rooms), but some transfer students had to be sent apartment hunting. Only four other universities are known to have yields higher than 60 percent: Harvard, Princeton, Yale and Stanford. . . .…

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Making the Most on Film

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

The women and a few men in the line look calm and hopeful. Most of their children, dark brown eyes wide with curiosity, bear signs that the poor of Mexico often believe is punishment for sins past: a cleft lip, an ugly scar, a burn mark.

Gina Vecchione ’97 and her sister, Ané, grew up hearing about these children from their father, Dr. Thomas Vecchione ’63. They also heard about the trips he and other volunteer members of the Mercy Outreach Surgical Team made to correct some of these medical and surgical problems. So in October 1999, the sisters went with the MOST

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Two Authors Champion Women's Basketball

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

On its way to the 2001 NCAA women’s basketball championship, Notre Dame came from behind to beat the University of Connecticut in the semifinal game and then squeaked by Purdue University in the heart-stopping final. In the life-is-full-of-strange-twists category, Notre Dame graduate John Walters ‘88 then published a book on UConn’s team, while Purdue graduate Mark Bradford published a book on Notre Dame’s team.…

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Back When My Rooster Was The Best

By Ronald Blubaugh '60

If ever there was a year in need of Easter it was 1943. World War II was in full fury, the end not yet in sight. At home my parents spoke in whispered voices about distant battles, about high school friends and neighbors’ sons who would not return.

That year, my parents and I lived at The Cherry Place, an old farmhouse just south of Derby, Kansas, near where the road to Mulvane took a hard left turn. When I drove by the house with my wife years later, she remarked that the cherry trees must have died. There never were any cherry trees, I told her. The house was owned by Mrs. Cherry, and in the Kansas way of talking that made her house The Cherry Place.…

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Milvio and Me, Trying To Be Holy

By Heather King

Somewhere around 1994, I hooked up with the L.A. Catholic Worker. For years I hung around at the Worker, trying to make myself think I was holy, trying to get them to think I was holy. For those who don’t know, the Catholic Worker is a lay movement started in New York City in the 1930s by Dorothy Day, an ex-Communist and Catholic convert who began by opening a soup kitchen in the Bowery and printing a newspaper, heavy on workers’ rights, that volunteers hawked on street corners for a penny apiece.…

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The Prodigal Father

By Michael J. Daley

Thirteen years is a long time to go without seeing someone, especially if it’s your father. Save for a quick visit before I went off to graduate school, bumping into each other for a few minutes at a family wedding and a short lunch so he could meet his newborn granddaughter, we had not spent any extended time together for more than a decade. Yet here I was on a Friday afternoon, picking up my father at the airport to spend the weekend with us.…

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God Is Where You Find Him

By Kerry Temple ’74

It occurred to me, then, ripping along at 85 miles an hour, engulfed in the darkness of the night, that one thing I like best about driving is that you are nowhere and everywhere at once. Even though you are bound, to some degree, by geography and law and physics, these are not rigid constraints. Their power ebbs and flows with time, leaving you untethered and free, “passing through,” as they say, and therefore tied to no here

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Web extra letters

By Readers

Kung Fu Nonsense

In the Winter 2001-02 issue of Notre Dame Magazine, Mr. John Monczunski highlights the work of Professor Wendy Arons in the article “Kung fu dream girls.” In the profile, and apparently in class and the cited book, Prof. Arons implies that there is a basic message emanating from Hollywood — that women can only be strong if sexualized and that to depict all women that way is, of course, bad. Her contention is that a better characterization (if not THE

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From print issue

By Readers

Mistaken Identity

“Kung fu dream girls” (Winter 2001-02) contains several errors. The photo is of Zhang Ziyi, not Michelle Yeoh. Also, the text describes Michelle Yeoh as the central female character of the film. I disagree. The movie has multiple plot lines, but if one had to identify the central female character, it is Jen, as played by Zhang Ziyi. Yeoh is a major supporting cast member.

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Spotlights: Twinkie chronicles; market stature; NEH likes ND

By Notre Dame Magazine

Twinkie chronicles

In 1930 the head of a company that baked sponge cakes for strawberry shortcake was trying to think of a way to continue selling the cakes when strawberries were out of season. He also liked the thought of keeping his bakers employed longer during those Depression years.

His idea: Poke a hole in the spongecakes — which back then were shaped like little loaves instead of the familiar shallow bowls of today — and fill them with banana cream. The Twinkie was born.…

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Wondering out loud: Where's the carbon in carbonated beverages?

By Notre Dame Magazine

Most of us hear carbon and think chunks of black, burned material, not something found in Sprite or Pepsi. The carbon in carbonated water is carbon dioxide gas, and it doesn’t stay around the water forever. Carbon dioxide mixes with water only when the liquid is kept under pressure. When you pop open a bottle or can, that pressure is released, and the gas starts coming out of the water because normal atmospheric pressure isn’t strong enough to keep it in. The pressure in your stomach is insufficient, too, which is why pop makes you burp. Gradually all the carbon dioxide in carbonated water will release into the air. Result: flat pop. Carbonated water is known in chemistry circles as carbonic acid.…

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Knowledge Is Power for Patients

By John Monczunski

Knowledge is power, the saying goes. And it might be good medicine. A recent study conducted by Notre Dame’s Walther Cancer Research Center found that cancer patients who were better informed about their condition sought and received more treatment, were more satisfied with their care and experienced fewer side effects to their therapies.…

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Web Extra: Gunning for Malaria

By John Monczunski

The malaria parasite, spread by female Anopheles mosquitoes, invades blood cells, multiplies, and eventually explodes the cells. This releases toxins and debris into the bloodstream, which causes the disease’s signature symptoms of intense fever followed by profuse sweating and violent chills. Each year up to 500 million cases of malaria are diagnosed worldwide, with as many as three million people dying. Most victims are pregnant women and children in Third World countries.…

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Web Extra: Ratting on Prostate Cancer

By John Monczunski

Notre Dame’s Lobund-Wistar rats have a few suggestions for men who hope to lower their risk for prostate cancer: Eat a diet rich in soy-based foods and eat moderately. Those findings were confirmed in recent studies conducted by Morris Pollard, professor emeritus of biological sciences, using the unique germfree animals he first developed 28 years ago at the University.…

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The New Sniper Drugs

By John Monczunski

“Resistance” is a word that makes epidemiologists break into a cold sweat. Unfortunately for you and me, they’ve been hearing it a lot lately, as more antibiotics become less effective. Modern medicine gained the upper hand over disease largely because of the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. But with increasing drug resistance due to overexposure, that tactic is less likely to remain effective. At some point in the war on disease it may be necessary to switch from the bomb to the rifle, a new generation of narrowly targeted antibiotics.…

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Building Better Blood

By John Monczunski

At any given time, U.S. blood banks may be just 36 hours away from going broke. And it’s no wonder: How do you match an unpredictable supply with an unpredictable demand?

To help resolve that problem, in recent years universal blood substitutes have been developed. The synthetic blood has worked well enough in trials, except it doesn’t last long in the body. Now, however, assistant professor of chemical engineering Andre Palmer believes he’s found a way to extend the blood substitute’s viability.…

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Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

By John Monczunski

Vitamin D has tantalized cancer researchers ever since the protein receptor for the vitamin was discovered in a wide array of bodily tissues about 15 years ago. For years its only known function was in maintaining healthy teeth and bones. So when scientists found the receptor in the breast and other bodily tissues, they were shocked.…

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Prostate Cancer: Why the Boomerang?

By John Monczunski

Treating prostate cancer can be a risky business. In lab studies with animal models, Notre Dame’s Martin Tenniswood has found that the two primary drugs used to treat the disease, flutamide and bicalutamide, in some cases can have a boomerang effect and actually foster cancer spread. “[I]f you don’t kill all of the localized tumor, you are making what is left a lot nastier,” says the Coleman Foundation Professor of Biological Sciences.…

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Mastering the Spiky Cell Trick

By John Monczunski

A funny thing happens to red blood cells when they’re stored outside the body. The normally flat, disk-shaped cells puff into spiky balls. Put them back in the bloodstream later and they revert to their normal shape. Recently, Notre Dame chemists learned how to flip the spiky cells back to the disk shape in the test tube. That bit of chemical wizardry may seem insignificant, but it could lead to the development of powerful new anti-cancer drugs, says Professor of Chemistry Bradley Smith.…

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Pregnancy Mystery Solved

By John Monczunski

For some time medical researchers have known that pregnant women who are severely deficient in fibrinogen, a protein important for blood clotting, will miscarry 100 percent of the time. What hasn’t been known is why. Until now.

Using mice they had genetically engineered to mimic the human condition, scientists from Notre Dame’s W.M. Keck Center for Transgene Research recently identified the mechanism. Upon examining the embryos of altered mice at various points in their pregnancy, researchers found that the fertilized egg apparently implanted normally. Soon afterward, however, problems developed at the attachment site, where fibrinogen normally would be found. The site was observed to be less stable. In mice lacking the protein, the attachment site would rupture, resulting in intrauterine bleeding.…

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The Parasite that Gave Cats a Bad Name

By John Monczunski

Nested somewhere deep in your body may be a tiny, strange parasite called Toxoplasma gondii. Anywhere from one-third to one-half of all U.S. adults are believed to be infected with the parasite, popularly identified with cats. Most people never know it, though, because “toxo” doesn’t do anything bad unless your immune system isn’t working properly. The parasite encysts itself and lies dormant, periodically emerging only to be suppressed by the body’s immune system.…

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The Glowing Eyes of the Zebrafish

By John Monczunski

There are some highly unusual and valuable fish darting back and forth in their tanks in the basement of Notre Dame’s Freimann Life Sciences Center. David Hyde, professor of biological science, and his colleagues have tailor-made some inch-long transparent zebrafish to exhibit green fluorescent light in the sensory cells of their eyes.…

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The First Line of Defense

By John Monczunski

Disease is life gone awry. At its base are complicated, intertwined chemical reactions that get twisted and broken. The way to gain victory over disease is to understand those reactions. That’s what Notre Dame scientists are attempting in labs from as far as the deserts of Africa and jungles of New Guinea. From here and there dozens of campus scientists are laying the groundwork for new drugs and therapies for breast cancer, prostate cancer, malaria, tuberculosis, degenerative eye diseases, heart disease and other maladies.…

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Medicine Beads

By John Monczunski

Agnes Ostafin makes tiny hollow glass beads. They are functional, not decorative. And someday they might save your life. Thousands of the beads, called nanoshells, could sit on the period at the end of this sentence.

The assistant professor of chemical engineering has been able to fill the beads with liquid molecules and then release them at will, an ability that makes the nanoshells a good candidate to deliver drugs.…

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Face Recognition System

By Ed Cohen

“Halt, who goes there?” sentries traditionally bark. But what if they didn’t have to rely on a password or coded response? What if a computer could tell friend from potential foe on sight?

Such is the dream of today’s military and security planners. Spurred by the terrorist attacks of September 11, computer systems are being developed that attempt to identify people from afar by the features of their faces or hands, the shape of their heads, even the way they walk.…

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