News » Archives » June 2005

IM therefore I am

By John Monczunski

Instant messaging, the ability to converse online with one or more individuals in real time via email, has been around for about 10 years. According to a Pew Report, 53 million Americans use IM and 24 percent use it more than traditional email. It has become especially popular among college students. A study conducted by students in Associate Professor Susan Blum’s linguistic anthropology class found that 97 percent of Notre Dame students use IM and 63 percent use it five times or more a day. After face-to-face conversation, IM is the most popular communication method among Notre Dame students, ahead of phone conversations, letters and email.…

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A new class of nanostructures

By William Gilroy

Researchers from the University of Notre Dame and Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a new class of materials that may provide a better understanding of how radioactive materials behave in the environment.

“No one has ever seen anything like these,” says Peter Burns, chairman of Notre Dame’s Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences. Called actinyl peroxide compounds, the materials self-assemble into unbelievably small hollow cages that could have useful new electronic, magnetic and structural properties important to the emerging world of nanotechnology.…

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How do you catch the wind?

By John Monczunski

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The sight was eerie, no doubt. In the dead of night last summer in the middle of Utah’s Great Salt Lake Desert, a theatrical fog machine pumped out a steady stream of white smoke while technicians zapped it with green laser light and videotaped the swirls and eddies. What may have looked like special-effects filming for a science-fiction movie was in truth an experiment to determine science fact. Specifically it was to understand high-speed air turbulence, which is of interest to airplane designers, among others.…

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What do you do with the world's most dangerous trash?

By John Monczunski

What Do You Do With the World’s Most Dangerous Trash?

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In the last 50 years the United States has produced approximately 30 million tons of high-level radioactive waste, mostly spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and radioactive debris from weapons production. The material, which will remain hazardous for more than two million years, has been temporarily stored at more than 100 sites across the nation. After 20 years of study, the federal government recommended in 2002 that Yucca Mountain, a remote site in the Nevada desert 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, become the permanent repository for this dangerous waste. While critics question the project’s safety, proponents counter that the alternatives may be even more dangerous. Professor Peter Burns, chairman of Notre Dame’s department of civil engineering and geological sciences, has been involved in the Yucca Mountain Project for eight years. Recently, we talked with him about his work and the safety of Yucca Mountain.…

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Checkback: Cedar Grove response

By Ed Cohen

What was the response by alumni to the offer of body vaults and niches for cremated remains in Cedar Grove Cemetery?

More than 1,500 people have already completed the proposal’s survey form at cominghome.nd.edu. The administrator in charge says many of the comments have revolved around the thought that in many families the children have scattered to different parts of the country and the parents have retired away from their original hometown. The place they reunite, often, is at Notre Dame, so it’s the ideal place for memorials to family members. If demand appears strong enough, organizers expect to present plans to University Trustees at their meeting in October 2005. If approved, sales could begin immediately with the first entombments possible in late 2006.…

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Eucharistic procession revived

By Ed Cohen

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An estimated 250 students and other members of the campus and local communities revived a tradition on the Notre Dame campus with a Eucharistic Procession April 16,2005. Once a yearly event, Eucharistic processions through campus fell out of practice in the years following the Second Vatican Council. The tradition’s revival reflects a renewed interest in classical devotions to the Sacrament of the Eucharist among Notre Dame students. A half-dozen student groups helped organize the event, which also recognized cultural diversity through benedictions and altar decorations reflecting Filipino, European and Latino customs.…

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Popular hymns born in Basilica of the Sacred Heart

By Ed Cohen

It’s not unusual for the director of the Notre Dame Folk Choir, Steven Warner ’80M.A., to walk into the Basilica or somewhere else where a wedding is taking place and hear “Set Your Heart on the Higher Gifts.”

If the bride and groom are knowledgeable Christians, they’re likely to recognize the source of the lyrics, especially the last line of the refrain: “These three gifts are all that remain: faith, hope and love, and the greatest is love.” They’re from Saint Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians.…

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Notre Dame landmarks disappearing

By Ed Cohen

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The abundant construction happening on campus is being accompanied by a fair amount of destruction.

The most controversial transition involves the future of the University Club. The private dining club has long been a popular gathering place for faculty, especially retirees, but plans call for an engineering college building to take its place on the east side of Notre Dame Avenue between McKenna Hall (the Center for Continuing Education) and the Hesburgh Center. Many of the club’s members don’t want to see it go and have gathered hundreds of signatures on a petition along with letters of opposition.…

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Now that's some graduation gift

By Ed Cohen

Senior Johnny Walsh was so pleased with his four years at Notre Dame that as he neared graduation he decided to give something to the University.

$25,000.

The gift is earmarked for the University’s Office for Students with Disabilities.

Walsh has had a hearing deficiency since birth and started to lose his sight at age 15 as a result of a progressive genetic disease, Usher syndrome. At Notre Dame he was able to take tests at the Office for Students with Disabilities and was given extra time to complete them, he says. The office also provided note-takers for lectures and students to read text books aloud, among other assistance. Walsh says he wants other students with disabilities to be able to come to the University and be provided the help they need.…

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Commencement 2005

By Ed Cohen

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Monk’s farewell

Speaking at his final commencement as president of Notre Dame, Father Edward A. Malloy, CSC, gave graduates three pieces of advice:

1. Cherish your friends.

2. Remain open to change and surprise.

3. Make room for God in your life’s routine.

“I have nothing but gratitude and thankfulness to all of you, this class and all the classes that preceded it,” said Monk, who stepped down June 30, 2005.…

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Hall Portrait: Pangborn

By Emily Howald '05

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Year Built:

1955

Male or Female?

Female since 1992

They Call Themselves:

Phoxes (“Violence” when males lived there)

Named For:

Thomas and John Pangborn of Hagerstown, Maryland, who underwrote construction of the hall, Notre Dame’s 15th. The Pangborns made their money manufacturing sand-blasting-type equipment. They also supported numerous educational, religious, scientific and charitable endeavors. Pope Pius XII

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The 2005 honorary degree recipients

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Thirteen distinguished figures in business, science, the Catholic Church, medicine, entertainment, sports, law and higher education joined principal speaker Vartan Gregorian and outgoing President Father Edward Malloy, CSC, and Provost Nathan Hatch as honorary degree recipients at the University’s 160th Commencement exercises May 15.…

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Two hats for Jenkins as his presidency begins

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The occupants of the top two administrative posts at Notre Dame stepped down June 30. And one person is filling both jobs, temporarily.

As announced last summer, Father John I. Jenkins, CSC, succeeded Father Malloy as president on July 1, 2005.

Earlier this year it was announced that Nathan Hatch, provost since 1996, is leaving to become president of Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He started there July 1. Jenkins will be acting provost until Hatch’s replacement is hired.…

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ND fencers national champions again

By Ed Cohen

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For the second time in three years and seventh time in the program’s history, the Irish are champions of collegiate fencing.

The combined men’s and women’s team edged defending-champion Ohio State 173-171 to win in the four-day NCAA tournament held in Houston in March.

With the Notre Dame’s women’s soccer team winning the NCAA

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Checkback: Ace suit appeal decided

By Ed Cohen

What became of the appeal of the federal court decision that said the Corporation for National and Community Service couldn’t help fund Notre Dame’s Alliance for Catholic Education program because the relationship violated the principal of separation of church and state?

In March 2005 a federal appeals court overturned the original ruling. One of the judges in the 3-0 appeals decision wrote that the government is neither promoting religion nor creating incentives for AmeriCorps volunteers to teach religion in the Catholic schools in which ACE

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Checkback: Australian harassers

By Ed Cohen

Were the off-duty police officers in Australia who harassed Notre Dame students studying abroad last year ever punished?

According to a newspaper report, an internal investigation by police led to the firing of one policeman and demotion of a second. Five others were ordered to pay fines ranging from $200 to $1,000.…

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Checkback: Taco Bell and migrant workers' wages

By Ed Cohen

Did the national movement against Taco Bell that included Notre Dame students convincing the University administration to end a sponsorship agreement with local Taco Bells succeed in increasing wages for migrant tomato pickers?

Yes. According to a press release issued in March 2005, Taco Bell has agreed to work with the Florida-based farmworker organization the Coalition of Immokalee Workers to address the wages and working conditions of farmworkers in the Florida tomato industry. That includes funding a penny-per-pound “pass-through” wage increase for workers employed by the suppliers of Florida tomatoes. In return, the worker group announced an end to its three-year boycott of Taco Bell.…

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Letters to the Editor

By Readers

Editor's note: The letters that appeared in the Summer 2005 print issue are marked with a double asterisk (**). The passing of Ed Cronin ** While you accurately captured the tribulations Professor Edward J. Cronin '38 put us through with regard to our writing, what he really taught us was how to _read_. One of the great moments for me was the intellectual luxury of spending 75 minutes dissecting four paragraphs, one of which was, of course, "the greatest paragraph ever written." He told us once in class he wanted his epitaph to read: "All his life a student, may he pass his finals." I'm quite certain he has, colors flying.

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Letters to the Editor, part 2

By Readers

Editor's note: The letters that appeared in the Summer 2005 print issue are marked with a double asterisk (**). Thoughts from other Church members ** Thanks for Mr. Weigel's fine article, "The Work Yet To Be Done." However, he could have included one unfinished job left over from John Paul II. At the risk of sounding provincial, maybe he could address the ugly sex scandal that has shattered a lot of idealism of many lay Catholics—if only a declaration to the effect that priests who are found guilty and convicted of doing ugly things to children will be turned over to authorities and defrocked. With all the eulogies following the pope's death, it may be unseemly to suggest that this great man failed to condemn the clergy responsible for these travesties. But the assigning of Cardinal Law to say the eulogy Mass for the pope further distressed the Catholics I have talked to.

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Letters to the Editor, part 3

By Readers

Editor's note: The letters that appeared in the Summer 2005 print issue are marked with a double asterisk (**). And then there's Notre Dame football ** Apart from my family, the most profound influence on my life has been my time at Notre Dame. I learned compassion, honor, tenacity and loyalty while there, and I have tried to make those traits the guiding principles of my life. Most of the Notre Dame graduates I know feel the same way, and we have all tried to make the world a better place "from the bottom up," in the Saint Francis of Assisi mode. Notre Dame, with its recent emphasis on academic achievement and the personal accomplishments of its graduates, seems to me to be trying to make the world a better place "from the top down." There's nothing wrong with that as long as the human qualities of care for the feelings of others, loyalty and the like are not lost.

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New CDs from ND musicians

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Close Your Eyes, _Josephine Cameron '00MFA_ (Modo Records). Albums of lullabies, Cameron's sister told her, can be boring. The singer's response is her third CD, which she calls "lullabies for young and old." The 13-track album contains such traditional songs as "Bow Down Low" and four original songs written by Cameron and Anthony Walton '82. She accompanies all the songs with solo guitar. Samples and more information are available at www.josephinecameron.com…

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

When the parents of Terri Schiavo asked the three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta for an emergency order restoring the feeding tube to their brain-damaged daughter, the court denied the request in a 2-1 vote. The dissenter was Judge Charles Wilson '76, '79J.D. . . . Thomas Sneddon Jr. '63…

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Alumni briefs

By Notre Dame Alumni Association

Alumni Association Awards The Rev. William Corby, CSC, Award will be presented to retired Lt. Col. Jack B. Matthews '63 during halftime of the ND-Navy football game on November 12. He received his Marine Corps commission in 1964 and served for 22 years before retiring. After earning advanced degrees from Washington State University, he became associate dean of academics at the Marine Corps University, Quantico, Virginia, until his retirement in March. He lectures extensively to young people, especially Marines, all around the world on the impact of alcoholism on the individual and the family. Matthews is credited with helping countless numbers of Marines recognize the need to seek help with alcoholism.

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