News » Archives » July 2005

Laetare medal to labor priest

By Notre Dame Magazine

Monsignor George G. Higgins, scholar, activist and foremost “labor priest” of the Catholic church in the United States, was awarded this year’s Laetare Medal at commencement.

Throughout his career, Higgins has been a forceful and occasionally controversial advocate of organized labor, often appearing on picket lines to rally and support striking workers. He was a participant and speaker at the first congress of Solidarity in Poland.…

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Honorary degree recipients 2001

By Notre Dame Magazine

Joining President Bush as honorary-degree recipients at commencement were these nine other distinguished individuals:

— John Bahcall, astrophysicist and Richard Black Professor of Natural Sciences at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. He has done seminal work on detecting solar neutrinos, developing a comprehensive model of the Milky Way Galaxy, and advocacy, planning and use of the Hubble Space Telescope.…

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All the presidents’ visits

By Richard Conklin

reagan

It was during the March 1975 visit of President Gerald Ford to Notre Dame that we learned how dangerous it is to sup with the leader of the free world.

At a dinner for Midwest governors atop the Memorial Library, a Secret Service man stationed at the door to the holding kitchen watched as wait staff brought out the entrees. “That one,” he said randomly, and the plate toward which he had nodded was served to President Ford. In short, if you intended to poison the president, you had to poison everyone.…

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Deaths in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine

FATHER ANTHONY J. LAUCK, CSC, ‘42, whose statue of Our Lady of the University welcomes visitors to campus at the Main Circle and who was a pioneering figure in art at Notre Dame and within the Holy Cross community, died in April at age 92. His many campus works also include a massive replica of his statue of the Visitation on the south side of the Eck Visitors’ Center, and the Basilica of the Sacred Heart’s statue of Blessed Brother Andre Bessette, CSC

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Web Extra Seen and Heard

By Notre Dame Magazine

Club sports athletes are always unsung, so let’s sing about a couple here from this past year: Freshman Leigh Hellrung took gold in both the slalom and giant slalom at the Midwest Collegiate Snowsports Association Divisionals and then won silver in the slalom and gold in the giant slalom at the MCSA Regionals. At the latter she competed against skiers from six varsity teams ranked in top 20 nationally. Senior Tes Salb

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Seen and Heard Around Campus

By Notre Dame Magazine

The lead advance agent for the Secret Service team that protected President Bush during his commencement visit was Cornelius Southall ‘89, who played free safety on Notre Dame’s 1988 national championship football team. Four other Notre Dame alumni in the Secret Service were part of the detail: Troy Wilson ‘87,who played cornerback for the Irish; and from the agency’s Chicago office, Sheila Horox ‘87, R.G. Starmann ’93, ’97MBA and Tim Gilroy ’94. Domers have long been popular with the feds. When J. Edgar Hoover ran the FBI

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Study break -- cover your eyes

By Ed Cohen

runners

It was on for tonight, the source on my voice-mail said, 10:30, second floor.

So here we were, me and photographer Lou Sabo, on the second floor of Hesburgh Library, the Tuesday of finals week, spring 2001, trying to record for posterity one of Notre Dame’s less-storied and probably never-before-photographed-for-publication traditions: the Bun Run.…

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Web extra- Catholic Schools: A place with spiritual moorings

By Sister Mary Brian Costello, RSM, '57M.A.

“It’s thirteen o’clock.” George Orwell proclaimed that in 1984. What time is it now for Catholic schools? The frequency of school closure announcements stirs an uneasy sense in me that time may gradually run out for Catholic schools. As a former superintendent of Catholic schools in a large urban archdiocese, I deplore this diminished presence of the Catholic Church’s investment in the future.…

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Tigers and Hawk

By Brian Doyle ’78

I am standing in the hospital watching babies emerge from my wife like a circus act. First one out is a boy, dark-haired and calm, the size of an owl. He is immediately commandeered by a nurse who whisks him off for a bath and a stint in what appears to be tiny tanning bed.

Now, says the doctor, reaching inside my wife while he talks, here’s the other one, and he hauls out another boy. This one is light-haired and not calm; he grabs for a nurse’s scissors and won’t let go and they have to pry his fingers off and the nurse looks accusingly at me for some reason.…

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A dot.com liquidation tale

By Christy Conklin '88

business

On January 18 I walked into my office at ebeon Ltd. in New York City to find everyone gathered in the unfinished conference room listening to a phone call from our managing director in Ireland. He told us that the company had missed payroll, that there would be no severance pay and that no one was quite sure what has happened to our 401k deposits. The telephone was sitting on the edge of the table, stretched as far as possible from the wall. This was fitting because, despite the fact that we were given state-of-the-art global cell phones, no one had gotten around to buying an extension cord. The upshot of the conversation was that eircom, the majority owner of our Dublin-based e-commerce architecture firm, had just had a board meeting and decided not to give our company a new round of financing. Ebeon had ceased to exist.…

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The Hidden Life of Woodrow Baker

By Patricia Booker

Woodrow Baker uses a wooden spoon to prop open his door on the days when he knows I’m coming. That way he doesn’t have to hobble over on his scratched wooden cane to let me in. He can stay leaning on his bed, gazing out the 10th floor window and listening to talk radio, where he learns a lot about the world. Just recently he learned that Hillary Clinton might well be a lesbian.…

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A swing at success for Tom Coyne

By Tom Coyne '97, '99MFA

coynebk

Dear Notre Dame Magazine:

My name is Tom Coyne and several years ago I sent you a profile I had written. Wisely and mercifully, you guys rejected my story, a loquacious, wandering and rather uninteresting piece of writing. I was a senior then and taking Walt Collins’s “writing for publication” class. It was a wonderful class, and I am grateful to Professor Collins for steering me toward a writing competition in Indianapolis that fall. I was fortunate that something else I’d written won the Keating Writing Challenge and appeared in the Indianapolis Star

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Who's to blame when schools fail?

By Ed Cohen

kidsleep

Once upon a time there was a village with a bakery famous for its delicious pumpkin pies. The villagers took pride in their bakery, and rightly so. It really was their bakery. They owned it jointly, and the surrounding farms supplied all the pumpkins that went into the pies. People came from all around to buy the pies, and the village prospered.…

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Seen and Heard web extra

By Chas Grundy

As is the case at many businesses, to make an outside call from a Notre Dame telephone, you have to dial 9 first. But so many people accidentally dial 9-1-1 (which connects to campus Security/Police emergency) that telephone users are being asked to dial 8 instead of 9. For now both 8 or 9 work, but starting in September, only 8 will. . . . Speaking of numbers,…

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Seen and heard on campus

By Chas Grundy

The new pope once had the chance to become a professor at Notre Dame. In the early 1960s President Hesburgh wrote to Father Joseph Ratzinger—then an up-and-coming German theologian—inviting him to join the faculty as a visiting professor or permanent member of the faculty. Hesburgh was scouring the world for prospects in his quest to bolster Notre Dame's theology faculty. Speaking with reporters shortly after Ratzinger's election as Pope Benedict XVI, Hesburgh said the German scholar wrote back saying he'd love to come and teach at Notre Dame but he didn't think his English was good enough. . . . Organizers of the Bengal Bouts…

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Deaths in the Notre Dame Family

By Chas Grundy

ABBOT ASTRIK L. GABRIEL, who directed Notre Dame's Medieval Institute from 1952 to 1975, died May 16, 2005, in Dujarie House at Holy Cross College. He was 97. A distinguished figure on campus, Gabriel spoke English with a thick Hungarian accent and booming voice. With an air of aristocracy, the internationally respected scholar was a connoisseur of fine food and wine who was known by sommeliers, chefs and _maitre d's_ from South Bend to New York to Paris. One of the world's foremost authorities on medieval education, Gabriel was born in Pecs, Hungary, entered religious life with the Order of Canons of Premontre in 1926, and joined the Notre Dame faculty in 1948. Gabriel wrote numerous books and articles on medieval university life and oversaw the Notre Dame's Frank M. Folsom Ambrosiana Collection, an unprecedented microfilm reproduction of all the manuscripts and drawings of the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan. The Astrik L. Gabriel University Collection, including numerous books he donated, is among the world's richest library collections on the history of universities. During his Notre Dame tenure, Gabriel also served as a visiting professor at Harvard, was twice a member of Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study, was a member of French, Bavarian and Hungarian Academies of Science, and was decorated by France, Italy and the Holy See.

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The storybook season: Women's basketball at ND

By David Haugh

Tears smeared the yellow paint that covered 8-year-old Tim Heisler’s face.

Halftime of the NCAA Women’s Basketball semifinal game last March 30 at the Savvis Center in Saint Louis, and Notre Dame trailed Connecticut by 12. This was not how Tim envisioned his hero, Ruth Riley, hanging up her headband for good.…

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Web Extra: Alumni Service profiles

By Sean O'Brien '86 arch

Dr. Jeffrey DeMartino ’84 broke his jaw as a student participating in Notre Dame’s Bengal Bouts. After graduation he went on to become a dentist and has continued his interest in boxing, working with professional boxers to develop safer mouth guards. The New Jersey dentist has invented a new mouth guard that allows any athlete using it to breathe through the device without opening his mouth. Profits from sales of the mouth guard, called the Bengal Bite, are donated to Holy Cross missions in Bangladesh.…

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An Association Serious About Service

By John Monczunski

The Notre Dame Club of Staten Island has collected over 300,000 nonperishable food items in nine years of its annual food drive. Meanwhile, the Tax Assistance Program of the Black Hills ND Club realized over $32,000 in tax savings for families in need last year, while the Minnesota Notre Dame Club mobilized 75 volunteers for a Christmas holiday party for 700 inner-city young people.…

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"You Just Wonder About God's Call"

By Melinda Henneberger '80

The plan was that I could finish my newspaper story, be in the cab by 5 and still make my 6:30 plane to South Bend for the “Day of Reflection” about what the volunteer experiences many of us had after leaving Notre Dame mean later, 20 years later in my case. What difference had it made in my carpooling, deadline-crashing, tall-skim-latte guzzling everyday life?…

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In Business to Help

By Calvin J. Cohen

Occasionally during a long business career I would wonder whether what I was doing was at all beneficial to mankind. It might have been a stretch, but I could rationalize that by indirectly helping my company produce affordable apparel I was supplying one of people’s basic needs. I didn’t ponder the question very often because most of my time was divided between work and family. But when I retired after 40-plus years, I was able to revisit the question and maybe deal with it in a more honest and direct manner.…

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Their Own Amazing Grace

By Brendan Moore '98

It’s called the House of Charity, a place in Spokane, Washington, “for the homeless, for the hungry, for the hurting, for the naked, for the weary.” I went there right after graduation, having joined the Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) because I wasn’t sure what to do with my life and thought it’d be a challenging experience. It would also mean a journey to the great Northwest.…

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There Are Children Here

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

langford

Jill and James Langford laugh when they talk about buying their expansive grounds in the country, a few miles south of Notre Dame. “We moved out there to be private — to get away from it all,” says Jim ‘59, an adjunct assistant professor in ND’s core course and former director of Notre Dame Press. Jill ’80, the owner of publishing company Diamond Communications, nods in agreement. “We had moved out here to do our own thing,” she says, “and felt a bit selfish.”…

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The Orphans of Premananda

By John Monczunski and Mary Elizabeth Calabrese Levins

leafcard

Jon James ‘64 knows firsthand that an ordinary person can make a difference. Seventy orphans in southern India have a roof over their head, nutritious food to eat and educational opportunities, largely because of his efforts. The associate professor of English at Hawaii’s Chaminade University has raised much of the funds needed to construct and maintain the Premananda Orphanage Centre in Ongole, India.…

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The Not So Little Gift of Sight

By Richard J. Duffey. M.D., '79

Two patients in particular caught my attention today. One, a 10-year-old boy named Juan Elvis Jananpa, is blind in one eye and has limited vision in the other from an explosion when he was 7. We can fix the blind eye with cataract and lens implant techniques. Smiles abound all around when the translators explain this to his family.…

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A Home for New Beginnings

By John Monczunski

Standing at the kitchen counter in Maggie’s Place, Sarah tells her story matter-of-factly as she chops onions for an omelette. The details are daunting but told without self-pity. An opaque film covers her eyes but doesn’t impede her work. Her blindness, she explains as she deftly dices the onion, was the result of a doctor’s mistake at birth. Like many premature infants of her age she was treated with oxygen to prevent respiratory disease, and, like many who received too much oxygen, her retinas were severely damaged by the procedure. Gradually she lost her sight, until now she perceives only light.…

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Champion of the Dispossessed

By Ed Cohen

Mary Brosnahan ‘83 fishes a newspaper clipping out from under the many papers on her desk at the headquarters of New York City’s Coalition for the Homeless. It’s the front page from the previous day’s New York Daily News, showing a photo of a luxury hotel room and one of the tabloid’s trademark hysteria-inducing headlines: “Homeless — for $329 a night.”…

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Where Angels Dare to Tread

By Walton R. Collins '51

malachi

It’s lunchtime in a homelike residence on Cleveland’s near west side, and eight people are seated at the table. There’s a choice of two soups today, onion or shrimp-garlic. There’s also a baked tuna dish, some leafy salad with a selection of dressings, and either fruit pies or mint cookies for desert. Or both. Conversation is relaxed and cheerful, with a touch of family-style bantering and lots of compliments for the cook.…

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The Chalkboard That Is East Timor

By Dave Devine

The lesson is over for the day.

My students, 50 East Timorese children who have traveled to this decimated school for two weeks of English classes, are long gone. They have walked back to the church for noon prayer. Back to the mercado to barter over insufficient rice. Back to the cool acacia groves to harvest coffee beans. In the last few days I had joined them after the lesson for spirited games of futebol

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Blessed Are the Healers

By Mark Reynolds

Maurice Antoine’s feet are too bloated and misshapen to fit into socks. Wrapped in white muslin cloths, they look like canvas potato sacks on the floor of his shack in Haiti. From his bed, the 48-year-old plops each foot onto the sole of a giant sandal and fastens cargo-size Velcro straps. He stands up, slowly hoists his left leg forward and repeats the same motion with his right. Lumbering like an elephant, he steps out the door and onto a sunny footpath.…

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