News » Archives » 2005

Notre Dame landmarks disappearing

By Ed Cohen

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The abundant construction happening on campus is being accompanied by a fair amount of destruction.

The most controversial transition involves the future of the University Club. The private dining club has long been a popular gathering place for faculty, especially retirees, but plans call for an engineering college building to take its place on the east side of Notre Dame Avenue between McKenna Hall (the Center for Continuing Education) and the Hesburgh Center. Many of the club’s members don’t want to see it go and have gathered hundreds of signatures on a petition along with letters of opposition.…

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Now that's some graduation gift

By Ed Cohen

Senior Johnny Walsh was so pleased with his four years at Notre Dame that as he neared graduation he decided to give something to the University.

$25,000.

The gift is earmarked for the University’s Office for Students with Disabilities.

Walsh has had a hearing deficiency since birth and started to lose his sight at age 15 as a result of a progressive genetic disease, Usher syndrome. At Notre Dame he was able to take tests at the Office for Students with Disabilities and was given extra time to complete them, he says. The office also provided note-takers for lectures and students to read text books aloud, among other assistance. Walsh says he wants other students with disabilities to be able to come to the University and be provided the help they need.…

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Commencement 2005

By Ed Cohen

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Monk’s farewell

Speaking at his final commencement as president of Notre Dame, Father Edward A. Malloy, CSC, gave graduates three pieces of advice:

1. Cherish your friends.

2. Remain open to change and surprise.

3. Make room for God in your life’s routine.

“I have nothing but gratitude and thankfulness to all of you, this class and all the classes that preceded it,” said Monk, who stepped down June 30, 2005.…

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Hall Portrait: Pangborn

By Emily Howald '05

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Year Built:

1955

Male or Female?

Female since 1992

They Call Themselves:

Phoxes (“Violence” when males lived there)

Named For:

Thomas and John Pangborn of Hagerstown, Maryland, who underwrote construction of the hall, Notre Dame’s 15th. The Pangborns made their money manufacturing sand-blasting-type equipment. They also supported numerous educational, religious, scientific and charitable endeavors. Pope Pius XII

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The 2005 honorary degree recipients

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Thirteen distinguished figures in business, science, the Catholic Church, medicine, entertainment, sports, law and higher education joined principal speaker Vartan Gregorian and outgoing President Father Edward Malloy, CSC, and Provost Nathan Hatch as honorary degree recipients at the University’s 160th Commencement exercises May 15.…

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Two hats for Jenkins as his presidency begins

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The occupants of the top two administrative posts at Notre Dame stepped down June 30. And one person is filling both jobs, temporarily.

As announced last summer, Father John I. Jenkins, CSC, succeeded Father Malloy as president on July 1, 2005.

Earlier this year it was announced that Nathan Hatch, provost since 1996, is leaving to become president of Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He started there July 1. Jenkins will be acting provost until Hatch’s replacement is hired.…

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ND fencers national champions again

By Ed Cohen

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For the second time in three years and seventh time in the program’s history, the Irish are champions of collegiate fencing.

The combined men’s and women’s team edged defending-champion Ohio State 173-171 to win in the four-day NCAA tournament held in Houston in March.

With the Notre Dame’s women’s soccer team winning the NCAA

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Checkback: Ace suit appeal decided

By Ed Cohen

What became of the appeal of the federal court decision that said the Corporation for National and Community Service couldn’t help fund Notre Dame’s Alliance for Catholic Education program because the relationship violated the principal of separation of church and state?

In March 2005 a federal appeals court overturned the original ruling. One of the judges in the 3-0 appeals decision wrote that the government is neither promoting religion nor creating incentives for AmeriCorps volunteers to teach religion in the Catholic schools in which ACE

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Checkback: Australian harassers

By Ed Cohen

Were the off-duty police officers in Australia who harassed Notre Dame students studying abroad last year ever punished?

According to a newspaper report, an internal investigation by police led to the firing of one policeman and demotion of a second. Five others were ordered to pay fines ranging from $200 to $1,000.…

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Checkback: Taco Bell and migrant workers' wages

By Ed Cohen

Did the national movement against Taco Bell that included Notre Dame students convincing the University administration to end a sponsorship agreement with local Taco Bells succeed in increasing wages for migrant tomato pickers?

Yes. According to a press release issued in March 2005, Taco Bell has agreed to work with the Florida-based farmworker organization the Coalition of Immokalee Workers to address the wages and working conditions of farmworkers in the Florida tomato industry. That includes funding a penny-per-pound “pass-through” wage increase for workers employed by the suppliers of Florida tomatoes. In return, the worker group announced an end to its three-year boycott of Taco Bell.…

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Letters to the Editor

By Readers

Editor's note: The letters that appeared in the Summer 2005 print issue are marked with a double asterisk (**). The passing of Ed Cronin ** While you accurately captured the tribulations Professor Edward J. Cronin '38 put us through with regard to our writing, what he really taught us was how to _read_. One of the great moments for me was the intellectual luxury of spending 75 minutes dissecting four paragraphs, one of which was, of course, "the greatest paragraph ever written." He told us once in class he wanted his epitaph to read: "All his life a student, may he pass his finals." I'm quite certain he has, colors flying.

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Letters to the Editor, part 2

By Readers

Editor's note: The letters that appeared in the Summer 2005 print issue are marked with a double asterisk (**). Thoughts from other Church members ** Thanks for Mr. Weigel's fine article, "The Work Yet To Be Done." However, he could have included one unfinished job left over from John Paul II. At the risk of sounding provincial, maybe he could address the ugly sex scandal that has shattered a lot of idealism of many lay Catholics—if only a declaration to the effect that priests who are found guilty and convicted of doing ugly things to children will be turned over to authorities and defrocked. With all the eulogies following the pope's death, it may be unseemly to suggest that this great man failed to condemn the clergy responsible for these travesties. But the assigning of Cardinal Law to say the eulogy Mass for the pope further distressed the Catholics I have talked to.

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Letters to the Editor, part 3

By Readers

Editor's note: The letters that appeared in the Summer 2005 print issue are marked with a double asterisk (**). And then there's Notre Dame football ** Apart from my family, the most profound influence on my life has been my time at Notre Dame. I learned compassion, honor, tenacity and loyalty while there, and I have tried to make those traits the guiding principles of my life. Most of the Notre Dame graduates I know feel the same way, and we have all tried to make the world a better place "from the bottom up," in the Saint Francis of Assisi mode. Notre Dame, with its recent emphasis on academic achievement and the personal accomplishments of its graduates, seems to me to be trying to make the world a better place "from the top down." There's nothing wrong with that as long as the human qualities of care for the feelings of others, loyalty and the like are not lost.

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New CDs from ND musicians

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Close Your Eyes, _Josephine Cameron '00MFA_ (Modo Records). Albums of lullabies, Cameron's sister told her, can be boring. The singer's response is her third CD, which she calls "lullabies for young and old." The 13-track album contains such traditional songs as "Bow Down Low" and four original songs written by Cameron and Anthony Walton '82. She accompanies all the songs with solo guitar. Samples and more information are available at www.josephinecameron.com…

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

When the parents of Terri Schiavo asked the three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta for an emergency order restoring the feeding tube to their brain-damaged daughter, the court denied the request in a 2-1 vote. The dissenter was Judge Charles Wilson '76, '79J.D. . . . Thomas Sneddon Jr. '63…

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Alumni briefs

By Notre Dame Alumni Association

Alumni Association Awards The Rev. William Corby, CSC, Award will be presented to retired Lt. Col. Jack B. Matthews '63 during halftime of the ND-Navy football game on November 12. He received his Marine Corps commission in 1964 and served for 22 years before retiring. After earning advanced degrees from Washington State University, he became associate dean of academics at the Marine Corps University, Quantico, Virginia, until his retirement in March. He lectures extensively to young people, especially Marines, all around the world on the impact of alcoholism on the individual and the family. Matthews is credited with helping countless numbers of Marines recognize the need to seek help with alcoholism.

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Strange Bedfellows

By Jeremy Manier '92

Hours before President George W. Bush spoke from his Texas ranch in August, 2001, to explain the administration’s new policy on funding for embryonic stem cell research, his aides told reporters that the momentous decision was comparable to sending troops to war.

The metaphor rang true for a controversy that had bitterly alienated the scientific community from religious leaders. Many people of faith — especially Catholics — held that research which destroys human embryos is always unacceptable. Biologists, who claimed no lesser love for human life, stressed that stem cells from embryos could bring treatments for diseases ranging from diabetes to Parkinson’s. Almost nightly, the two camps hashed out their differences in the primal scream debate format of cable news shows.…

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Empathy for Afghan Refugees

By Notre Dame Magazine

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Senior Luis Matos prays the rosary on the South Quad during an awareness-raising camp out organized by the Notre Dame Peace Coalition. In late February, 2002, 31 people slept overnight in tents during a snowstorm to express solidarity with Afghan refugees.


Notre Dame Magazine, Spring 2002

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The Eye of the Beholder

By Chet Raymo '58, '64Ph.D.

Edward O. Wilson and Wendell Berry are unlikely opponents in the cultural war. Both men have roots in rural America. Both men are motivated by a love of nature. Both men are prolific writers whose work is represented almost side by side in the The Norton Book of Nature Writing. Both men see environmental catastrophe in the offing if humans continue their wanton ways. Both men champion conservation and biodiversity.…

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The Notre Dame Man Who Beat Joe Louis

By Bob Walsh '48

A recent PBS documentary on the bitter Joe Louis-Max Schmeling rivalry brought to my mind another larger-than-life boxer named Max. He was a Polish-American from Chicago who earned a Notre Dame football scholarship in 1933, the same year he beat Joe Louis in the Golden Gloves finals in Boston. He thereafter billed himself as “The Man Who Beat Joe Louis.”…

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The Long Way Back

By Louis J. Glunz '84

For my 20th reunion last June I decided to bike to Notre Dame from Chicago. I have driven the sterile toll road route a hundred times, often wondering what the bike route would be like. The reunion gave me a purpose to be in South Bend, so I went for it.

My back-of-the-envelope navigation put the bike ride at 90 to 100 miles, with much of it on trails or back roads, so I knew it was doable. My mother and my sister tried to talk me out of it, but I was determined to ride.…

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My Notre Dame Parents

By Michael Dandurand '84

When I arrived as a freshman at Notre Dame in 1980, it was the first time I’d been away from my parents. Having lived in Hawaii all my life, my contact with the mainland United States was minimal; Disneyland at age 10 was it. I saw snow only on TV. South Bend, Indiana, was as foreign to me as most Midwesterners would consider Hawaii’s culture and customs to be. I was definitely a fish out of water.…

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Books in print & books in brief

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Hot Lights, Cold Steel: Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon's First Years, _Michael J. Collins, M.D., '71_ (St. Martin's Press). A fast-paced memoir of the fear, heartbreak, humor and triumph of the author's four-year residency in orthopedic surgery. Can that young boy's leg be saved? How do you tell a woman she has widespread cancer? And when do you stop being bone tired? "We were learning that all the training and all the caring in the world were not going to solve every problem," Collins writes. What he also learns is the role he truly plays as a doctor, a role in which compassion is integral to the treatment.

Commander of All Lincoln's Armies: A Life of General Henry W. Halleck

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The Voice That's Launched 1,000 Skits

By Ed Cohen

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Commenting on the pending collision between the planet Earth and a giant comet, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan had this to say in January:

“While it remains to be seen what the ultimate impact of the comet will be, I would recommend that people pay only the minimum on your credit card balance.”…

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Numbers paint the picture

By John Monczunski

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The destruction of southern Louisiana by flood water is a thing of beauty. Not in reality, of course; that would be a terrible calamity. But on Joannes Westerink’s computer screen it appears as graceful swirls of red, yellow and blue undulating in a green sea, morphing over time across a map of the coast. The image, which could be abstract art, is in fact an animated graph of what would happen to the Louisiana coastline from a hurricane-generated storm surge. The undulating colors signify the depth of the flow, increasing from yellow to red.…

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Wonder drug in the making?

By John Monczunski

Someday SB-3CT might save your life. The collection of letters and numbers is chemical shorthand for a novel compound that has shown promise in stopping cancer spread and lessening the effects of a stroke.

Designed and synthesized by Notre Dame Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Shahriar Mobashery and his colleagues, the compound has the ability to inhibit two enzymes, MMP

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Read any good books lately?

By John Monczunski

The declining interest in reading is a cause of concern for Mark Roche, Notre Dame’s dean of Arts and Letters. His new book, Why Literature Matters in the 21st Century, published by Yale University Press, makes the case that great literature is being neglected today even though it is needed more than ever. Among other things, we recently asked the scholar of German literature why he believes that to be so and what does Liberty Valance have to do with all this any way?

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Nuclear weapons course receiving renewed interest

By Ed Cohen

A course that has been taught here for years, Nuclear Weapons and Nuclear Warfare, is enjoying renewed interest in the wake of fears about weapons of mass destruction.

The class teaches not only about the physics and technological aspects of nuclear weapons but covers ethical, legal and social dimensions.…

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Meeting through the Facebook

By Bridget Veihmeyer '05

Notre Dame senior Paul Joice opens his e-mail inbox and finds one new message. A young woman has requested to become his friend. But before that can happen, the message informs him, he has to confirm that they are, in fact, already friends.

Confused? You wouldn’t be if you were a college student and had heard of thefacebook.com, as most have.…

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Swimming test still sinks some

By Ed Cohen

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Every year about 200 students fail the University’s mandatory swimming test and have to take eight weeks of swimming lessons.

The test requires students to complete four 25-meter lengths of the Rolfs Aquatic Center pool demonstrating both front and backstrokes.

The swimming requirement is believed to date to World War II, when drowning was a more frequent cause of death and the Navy encouraged colleges to institute swimming requirements and training.…

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