News » Archives » 2005

Father Nieuwland and the 'Dew of Death'

By Joel A. Vilensky

Many people know Father Julius Nieuwland, CSC, as the chemist and botanist for whom Nieuwland Science Hall is named. His greatest claim to fame was helping perfect synthetic rubber in the 1930s.

Few people know that the priest inadvertently discovered a deadly chemical weapon that he later believed would help make wars more humane.…

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U.S. Professor of the Year

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Chemistry professor Dennis Jacobs has been national Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the national Council for the Advancement and Support of Education.

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Hall Portrait: Howard

By Colleen Ganey '03

howardhall.jpg

Year Built: 1924

Capacity: 164, 2nd smallest women’s dorm after Badin Hall

Male or female? Men 1924-1987; women 1987-present

They Call Themselves: Ducks, after George Lucas’ oddball 1986 film Howard the Duck about a cigar-smoking, beer-chugging comic book character from outer space. The film fizzled at the box office but has since acquired a cult following.…

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Letter from Campus: Salute to the Old Guard

By Kerry Temple ’74

Jim Murphy died September 2, 2002. There’s an announcement of his death in this issue, but, as is the case with all obituaries, it only tells part of the story.

Jim Murphy,a 1947 ND graduate, came to work for Notre Dame in 1952. He was the University’s chief public relations officer when I came to work here in 1977. He was one of the nicest, kindest gentlemen I’ve ever known. He retired in 1992, and his final years were eventually consumed by a struggle with Parkinson’s that was both gallant and heartbreaking.…

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Seen and heard on campus

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

A television executive from San Antonio, who is the father of two current undergrads, was hired as the University’s new vice president for public affairs and communication, a division that includes Notre Dame Magazine.

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The Gift of Maggie

By Desiree A. Reo '83

I had just finished stowing the Christmas decorations in the attic, where one corner was filled with baby things we had used with our first child, Gabriele. Five years ago, we had lost our second child when I was 39 weeks pregnant

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Divine Revelation

By James M. Lang '91

It was finals week of my first semester: December 1987. I was sitting in my room on the 10th floor of Grace Hall, and a junior from the six-man down the hall walked into my doorway and threw a copy of Mere Christianity, by C.S. Lewis, into my trash can.

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Deaths in the family

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Relatively few of Notre Dame’s 96,000 alumni may recognize the name JAMES E. MURPHY ’47, who passed away last September of 2002 at age 78 after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease. But the retired associate vice president for university relations played an integral role in shaping the public’s perception of the University for four decades.…

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Will fuel cells zap the Energizer bunny?

By Ed Cohne

It wasn’t long ago that futurists were predicting the ascendancy of clean, quiet electric cars that would be plugged in at home to recharge. A new version of the future turns that scenario upside down: The house plugs into the car and draws whatever power it needs from the vehicle’s engine.

It’s not such a crazy idea. Most people don’t realize it, but making a car go takes much more energy than powering everything in the typical house. If cars ran on a more efficient, nonpolluting system such as fuel cells instead of by the combustion of gasoline, they could quietly and safely generate all the electricity a house needed from the garage. (Batteries would be needed to take over when the car was away.)…

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The Eck's Tyrannosaurus rex

By John Monczunski

rigbyrex.jpg

A new face with a toothy grin now greets patrons of Notre Dame’s Eck Visitor’s Center. A replica of the skull of “Peck’s Rex,” the Tyranosaurus rex fossil discovered in 1997 by a crew led by Notre Dame paleontologist J. Keith Rigby, Jr., went on display at the University in May. The 66-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus fossil, which derives its name from its discovery site near Fort Peck, Montana, made the national news when a ranch family claimed ownership and attempted to dig it up before Rigby’s crew could excavate it. Subsequently, legal authorities established that the family did not have title to the land and forced them to return the skull and other bones to Rigby. Recently, we had a brief chat with Notre Dame’s dinosaur hunter.

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Comments on the "I Was Abused..." Article

By Liquid error: internal

The article by Mr. Salveson was quite disturbing and tends to lend support to the emerging popular realization that the Catholic Church in this country has long been guided by a mafia-like corps of cardinals and bishops.
This is becoming more obvious with each passing month, and Mr. Salveson’s story is another example of someone coming forth to expose the corruption, deceit and cowardice which apparently exist at the highest echelons of our leadership. The coverup by bishops and cardinals of sexual abuse by priests seems to be part of an overall pattern of behavior we are only now beginning to notice.…

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Web Extra Letters

By Notre Dame Magazine

Standards too high?

With great interest I read the Summer 2003 article “What they’re like” in the Notre Dame magazine. I was happy to read of Notre Dame’s application numbers for the Fall 2003 class, and the description of the students accepted as the most qualified students ever to attend Notre Dame.…

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From Print Issue

By Notre Dame Magazine

Lyons, tuggers and elephants, oh my

The story about the Lyons Hall An Tostal elephant was historically inaccurate. In spring 1972 Lyons was a very “live and let live” type of place, with a lot of creativity and fun but not a lot of very large, strong people suitable for a tug-of-war team. So one night a few guys drinking wine hatched the elephant idea, and soon we had elephant rallies, elephant wapatoola parties and elephant raffles. We raised enough money and found the elephant, which came in a moving van and was draped in a Lyons Hall banner and marched, along with about 250 of us (many in festive attire “borrowed” from the theater department), to the tug-of-war field. We were totally stoked.…

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Books in Brief: Web Extra

By Notre Dame Magazine

European Christian Democracy: Historical Legacies and Comparative Perspectives, edited by Thomas Kselman and Joseph A. Buttigieg (Notre Dame Press). Views of the history and possible future of the European Christian Democracy movement. The editors, both ND professors, also are fellows of the University’s Nanovic Institute for European Studies.…

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Books in Brief

By Liquid error: internal

Gettysburg: You Are There, Robert Clasby ’83 (Buford Books). A full-color reconstruction, using digital technology, of pivotal moments in the 1863 Civil War battle, along with a summary of the battle’s key events.

A Family of His Own: A Life of Edwin O’Connor, Charles F. Duffy (Catholic University of America Press). A biography of O’Connor ’39, who won fame with the publication of The Last Hurrah

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Books in Print

By Notre Dame Magazine

Ten Circles upon the Pond: Reflections of a Prodigal Mother, Virginia Tranel (Knopf). Devoting a chapter to each of her 10 children, Tranel movingly celebrates the life of her family. The domestic details of raising children blend with the author’s insightful commentary on a changing culture. Tranel’s family includes five ND graduates: husband Nathanial (Ned) ’57M.A. and children Daniel ’79, Michael ’81, Alane ’86 and Jennie ’92, along with Elizabeth, SMC

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Advent Calendar Offers Campus Windows into Christmas

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Advent

Kevin Sandberg, CSC, ‘88, ’04M.Div., wanted to share the story about God’s coming in Christmas with his niece and nephews. He just didn’t want it to sound like a lecture. And so the 2003 Notre Dame Advent calendar was born.

The 30 inset windows of the calendar are on a photograph of Sacred Heart Basilica and the Main Building. Beginning November 30, 2003, a window should be opened each day, revealing a photo and text.…

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A Traditional Irish Twist Added to Notre Dame Songs

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Irish CD

With the wearing of the green and a two-fisted leprechaun and the shouts of “Go Irish” and a campus phone book filled with Colleens and Seans and Patricks and Meghans, Notre Dame students and fans like to claim a kinship with the Emerald Isle.

Still, something’s missing. “I’m a big traditional Irish music fan,” says Tim O’Neill ‘94. "But you don’t often hear it on campus."…

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Perrin Jazzes It Up in San Diego

By Liz Warren

Chuck Perrin

It’s a balmy Saturday night in downtown San Diego, and musician Chuck Perrin, a 1969 Notre Dame graduate, is, literally, in his comfort zone. In the Southern California coastal community that the Midwest native has called home for more than a quarter of a century, Perrin has claimed his niche in the fast-growing fringe of San Diego’s hip Gaslamp District (think Chicago’s Rush or Memphis’ Beale streets).…

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Perrin Jazzes It Up in San Diego

By Liz Warren

It’s a balmy Saturday night in downtown San Diego, and musician Chuck Perrin, a 1969 Notre Dame graduate, is, literally, in his comfort zone. In the Southern California coastal community that the Midwest native has called home for more than a quarter of a century, Perrin has claimed his niche in the fast-growing fringe of San Diego’s hip Gaslamp District (think Chicago’s Rush or Memphis’ Beale streets).…

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The Bear Truth

By Thomas P. Hoban Sr., '61

I’m not sure when I first heard about the Sophomore Comprehensive Examination. Sometimes it was referred to as “The Orals.” But soon after I entered Notre Dame in 1957, I heard the Liberal Arts students talking about the rigors of that test scheduled to be given at the end of sophomore year.
I can only imagine that the purpose was twofold: First, to find out if anything a student had studied the first two years had sunk in. Second, to determine if a student could communicate sensibly. There were horror stories circulating around the dorms that certain students who failed the test were told they couldn’t return. The reported numbers of the unfortunates were in the hundreds. To this day I am told that our class of 1961 had the poorest graduation rate in the history of the school. Whether the oral examination was just too much for some or if it was due to the Holy Cross Priest who taught Symbolic Logic freshman year (He was Chinese, had just returned from China, and we couldn’t understand him), I really can’t tell you. Whatever the reason, no one looked forward to The Orals at the end of the sophomore year.…

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Alumni Briefs

By Notre Dame Magazine

Tuition Plan Consortium

Notre Dame is among more than 200 private colleges and universities taking part in the Tuition Plan Consortium. Recently approved as a federal college savings program, the Independent 529 Plan provides a guaranteed amount of future tuition and mandatory fees based upon the amount contributed by individuals and each institution’s tuition, which will be modestly discounted from today’s costs. Portable to all participating institutions, the program does not guarantee admission but will offer a wide range of application choices. The benefit may be purchased by any U.S. citizen on behalf of any individual and is transferable to siblings or first cousins. It is currently limited to undergraduate tuition and fees. Three years of participation and a minimum contribution of $500 are required prior to disbursement.…

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Ned Fenlon: The Dapper Centenarian

By Liquid error: internal

Last July 4th, Ned Fenlon led a parade. It went down Mitchell Street, right past his house draped with red-white-and-blue, and on to Pennsylvania Park. As grand marshal, he rode in a 1941 Buick convertible ahead of the floats and the bands and the cheerleaders and, at the very end, the Petoskey High School Steel Drum Band, which stayed on to perform at the waterfront until it was too dark for face painting any more and just dark enough for the fireworks to begin.…

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A Note on the Contents

By Kerry Temple ’74

My parents and I always talked a lot when I was younger. We’d talk over dinner, then talk around the dinner table long after dinner was gone. Then — tired of sitting in straight-back chairs — we’d take the conversation into the den, which we called the caboose because it was a room added on to the back of the house. We disagreed a lot.…

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A Note on the Contents

By Kerry Temple ’74

My parents and I always talked a lot when I was younger. We’d talk over dinner, then talk around the dinner table long after dinner was gone. Then — tired of sitting in straight-back chairs — we’d take the conversation into the den, which we called the caboose because it was a room added on to the back of the house. We disagreed a lot.…

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