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Musicians mix it up from New York to California

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

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For Joanie Mendenhall ‘00, a career in New York City’s publishing world landed her solidly in the ranks of what she calls “a glorified secretary.” She pursued her passion for music on the side, writing and performing whenever possible. For Matt Curreri ‘99, a career in New York’s education system landed him a job as a high school algebra teacher. During his spare time, he wrote, recorded and performed music.

“I knew Matt at Notre Dame, but we weren’t good friends and weren’t playing music together,” says Mendenhall.…

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Goodman Theatre's Rock of Stages

By Ruth Keyso-Vail '91

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Everyone in the world of theatre has at least one of those “the-show-must-go-on” moments. For Roche Schulfer ‘73 it was in 1984, opening night of David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross at Chicago’s famed Goodman Theatre. Leading actor Joe Mantegna was on stage reciting one of the script’s lengthy monologues before a full house when he forgot his lines.…

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The ND Drain Brain

By John Monczunski

A heavy rainstorm shouldn’t cause pollution. But many cities have combined sanitary and storm sewers, and that’s precisely what happens when a cloudburst strikes. The swamped system overflows, forcing raw sewerage into rivers and lakes.

The conventional solution has been to build separate sanitary and storm sewers. Unfortunately, that fix is costly and time-consuming. In South Bend, for instance, the price tag has been estimated at $200 million over 20 years. But Jeffrey Talley, Notre Dame assistant professor of civil engineering, has a better idea: Make the existing sewers smart.…

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Quick like a cockroach

By John Monczunski

As anyone who has ever attempted to smash one knows, cockroaches are among God’s most agile creatures. They can achieve speeds of 50 times their body length per second, darting to safety before your rolled-up newspaper is anywhere near wreaking its vengeance. That ability, researchers have concluded, makes them an excellent model system to learn how to make nimble, maneuverable robots. All of which explains the smile that came to Alan Bowling’s face last spring when the Notre Dame assistant professor of mechanical engineering examined the equations and analysis of his graduate student Yanto Go.…

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Too sweet for your own good

By John Monczunski

A spoonful of sugar may make the medicine go down, but when too much glucose is afloat in the bloodstream bad things happen. Renal failure and blindness, for instance, which can result from diabetes, has been associated with so-called “non-enzymatic glycated proteins,” in which glucose has been added willy-nilly to the protein.…

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Seminar: Should you fear and loathe your teenager?

By John Monczunski

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Some mothers and their children glide easily through the preteen’s transition from childhood to adolescence. Others face a difficult time. Notre Dame associate professor of psychology Dawn Gondoli is in the seventh year of a longitudinal study of mothers and their children aimed at finding out why that is. Recently, we talked to her about parents and their teenage mutant ninja children_.…

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Bush-Kerry: The student vote

By Ed Cohen

A random sample poll of 273 students conducted by two political science majors three weeks before Election Day found 48 percent planned to vote for President Bush and 44 percent for John Kerry. The rest either favored another candidate or were unsure.

In a mock election held in the LaFortune Student Center a week before the election, 570 undergraduates and graduate students divided their vote this way between the two major candidates: 47.5 percent for Bush, 46.8 percent for Kerry. Bush won among freshmen and sophomores, Kerry among seniors and grad students. They more or less split the juniors.…

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Irish tongue becoming talk of campus

By Ed Cohen

At the home of the Fighting Irish, increasing numbers of students want to learn to speak Irish, even though only a tiny portion of the people in Ireland do.

Demand for Irish language courses has been strong since the establishment of the Keough Institute for Irish Studies in 1992. Last fall 67 undergraduates were enrolled in Irish language courses. The total was expected to top 80 this spring.…

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$3 million to combat brain drain

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The Lilly Endowment Inc. awarded a $3 million grant to Notre Dame as part of a $100 million effort to attract and keep the brightest and most talented minds in the state. Notre Dame will use the money to recruit new faculty and graduate students.

The Lilly Endowment is an Indianapolis-based, private philanthropic foundation created in 1937 by three members of the family that started the pharmaceutical business Eli Lilly and Company. Last year the endowment awarded Notre Dame $1 million to support a wide range of initiatives aimed at encouraging graduates of Indiana colleges and universities to pursue careers within the state.…

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Determination, 'Dad' helped alumna succeed

By Mary Kate Castellani '05

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When Lena Jefferson ‘90 was married last year, the person who gave her away was not even related to her. But over a decade earlier, during her undergraduate years at Notre Dame, he had told her that when the time came he would be more than willing to fill the place of the father she’d never known.…

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Hall portrait: Farley

By Mary Kate Castellani '05

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Year Built:

1947

Capacity: 245

Male or Female? Female since 1973

They Call Themselves: Farley’s Finest

Named For: Father John “Pop” Farley, CSC, who attended Notre Dame at the turn of the century and later returned to serve as rector of Corby, Walsh and Sorin halls. Students affectionately called him “Pop” because of his habit of referring to residents as “my boys.” It was said that Farley never missed an event in which one of his hall’s residents participated. The priest died in 1939.…

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Seen and Heard

By Ed Cohen

_Live! With Regis and Kelly_ was live from Notre Dame on October 24. Regis '53 was here, but Kelly Ripa co-hosted from the show's regular studio headquarters in New York City. The day before the broadcast Regis performed a concert to benefit South Bend's Center for the Homeless. Tickets weren't cheap—$30 for the general public and $100 for preferred seating—but the show sold out the 900-plus-seat concert hall of the new Marie P. DeBartolo Center for the Performing Arts. That raised nearly $80,000 for the homeless center, according to the center's director. Regis sang selections from his new CD of standards, _When You're Smiling,_ backed by a 22-piece pick-up orchestra consisting of 14 Notre Dame students and eight local professionals. . . . . The Mendoza…

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Letter from Campus: Boys in Disguise

By Mary Kate Castellani '05

Winter 2004–05

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For more than 10 years Keenan Hall has hosted its signature community-outreach event, The Great Pumpkin. It’s an opportunity for underprivileged children in and around South Bend to come to campus and enjoy all the typical Halloween activities in a fun and safe environment. The dorm’s residents set up a haunted house in their basement and some pumpkin-carving stations. They escort the kids around campus to trick-or-treat at the other residence halls. The little kids seem to love it—and so do the big kids.…

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Boys' Nights In

By Ed Cohen

Seated on a couch in the room of his dorm’s assistant rector, Keenan Hall sophomore John McDermott makes an observation that, taken out of context, might be disturbing. “Definitely the most satisfying kill,” he says, “is when you walk up behind someone and hit them in the back of the head.”

The business major, known as J-Mac around the dorm, announces this without taking his eyes from the 27-inch television opposite the couch or stilling his thumbs on the video game controller he clutches with both hands. Next to him, eyes and thumbs identically occupied, sits the assistant rector, Justin Kay, a third-year law student.…

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The Task at Hand

By Margie Davis '94M.A.

It had been a year of losses.

Deaths, divorce, disease, you name it. Just when I thought I had nothing left to lose, came a letter from the city informing me that it was purchasing my home to make room for a parking lot. I tried to look at it philosophically. The unexpected windfall would pay my tuition to nursing school. Still, it meant leaving my home of 15 years.…

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The Woman in Me

By Heather King

I’m not sure when I started to notice that I was turning into my mother. Idly checking myself in the full-length mirror one morning, out of the corner of my eye I catch an ever-so-slight thickening. Oh my God, those are my mother’s ankles. Another double take in the mirror a couple of years later: the shadow of my mother’s jowls. A blue pulse on the inner part of my left calf shortly afterward: the beginning of my mother’s varicose veins. A certain interested, encouraging way of saying “Mmm-hmm” when someone was speaking, an entire genetic code—voice box, gestures, character—transmitted invisibly, silently, whole.…

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A Death in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

JACK MOONEY was the name people at Notre Dame knew him by. The South Bend resident coached and trained students in the Bengal Bouts charity boxing tournament for more than 50 years, most of that time alongside the legendary Nappy Napolitano. But when “Jack Mooney” passed away in September 2004 at age 92, most in the campus boxing community probably were surprised to learn that his real name was John Sekendy. He had been using his fighting name from his youth, when he boxed in the amateur Golden Gloves tournaments. Sekendy was born in Hungary and moved to South Bend with his parents in 1920 when he was 8. As a child he sold newspapers on the street, most famously to Knute Rockne, who would help him sneak into football games by loosening a board in the fence at old Cartier Field. The legendary coach later allowed him to jog into the new stadium with the football team. Perhaps as payback, Sekendy, in his later years, made it a ritual to visit Rockne’s grave in Highland Cemetery, a few miles west of campus, and trim the grass around the Rock’s headstone at least once a week. Sekendy worked at Studebaker Corporation and boxed on the company team. After the car maker closed in the early 1960s he was employed by AM General, maker of the Humvee military vehicle, until he retired in 1978. Among the thousands of students he helped train for Bengal Bouts was Jeevan “Joe” Subbiah ‘98, who boxed all four years he was a student. In an appreciation published in the South Bend Tribune,

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Seen and Heard: web extra

By Ed Cohen

Summer-long voting at the official Notre Dame athletics website, www.und.com, yielded a 25-player All-Century Basketball Team to commemorate the men's program's 100th season. One of the most striking details about the players elected is how much less scoring there used to be. The legendary Moose Krause led the Irish in 1931-32 with an average of 7.7 points per game. The only current player to make the All-Century team was point guard Chris Thomas. . . . As was the case last yea…

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ND 13th best in new study

By Ed Cohen

Notre Dame is 18th in the latest U.S. News & World Report college rankings but 13th using a new rating system developed by four East Coast scholars.

The alternative system relies on what its developers call “revealed preference ranking,” that entails asking individual students which colleges they prefer, one versus another. The U.S. News

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Domers at the helm

By Ed Cohen

During the weekend of last season's home football game against Boston College, Father Malloy hosted a reception for 17 Notre Dame alumni who are presidents of other colleges and universities. A total of 28 Domers currently head institutions of higher learning. Here they are in order of the year they were appointed:

Peter Sampo '60, '68Ph.D., Thomas More College (Merrimack, N.H.), appointed 1978…

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(Middle) name these Domers

By Ed Cohen

Match these members of the extended Notre Dame family with their middle names. …

1. Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, CSC, '39

2. Rev. Edward "Monk" Malloy, CSC, '63, '67M.A., '69M.Th.

3. Phil Donahue '57

4. Regis Philbin '53

5. Tyrone (is actually his middle name, what's his first?) Willingham

6. Muffet McGraw

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Checkback: The ACE program judgment

By Ed Cohen

What’s the status of the judgment that declared government financial support of the Alliance for Catholic Education program unconstitutional on the grounds of separation of state and religion?

At the end of August the federal district court judge who ruled against the program entered a stay of her own ruling while AmeriCorps and ACE

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Letters to the editor

By Readers

Study abroad

I was pleased with the attention given in the autumn 2004 issue to the University's study abroad aspirations as part of Notre Dame's latest strategic plan, and I am delighted to report that some of the items are now reality. We now have two programs in China—the Shanghai program launched in 2001 and a new program in Beijing. The Beijing program and a new year-long program at the University of Bologna in Italy are precisely designed to address the call for a bilingual student body. And in November, the Association of International Educators recognized Notre Dame for the excellence of its student abroad programs.…

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Web extra letters to the editor

By Readers

Latino articles

Re: A Theology of Immigration" by Father Daniel Groody: Living in the San Diego area for over 30 years I have been a witness to an incredible dilemma. Both the Mexican and United States governments are at fault! The _interruptions_ included below are too common events.

Hopefully, either Kerry or Bush will address this "death trap" and issue some sort of ID that will allow all immigrants from our southern borders to enter the USA in a sane and safe manner!…

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Comments on "A Question of Conscience"

By Readers

_Editor's note: The following letters were received through the magazine's React Online form_. I read with interest the article,"Question of Conscience" and found it very intelligent until the author addressed the issue of pro-choice politicians. Appleby's assertion that such a politician is respecting the priority and inviolability of conscience and that somehow that justifies his voting for laws that allow the taking of human life is really very disingenuous. The only way the inviolability of conscience could be given a higher priority than the protection of the unborn is if such politician really did not believe that before birth human beings are entitled to full human rights. Such a position is in direct contradiction to the teachings of the Catholic Church and could only be explained as being the result of poor catechesis or faulty conscience formation on the part of said individual.

I might also add it shows a profound ignorance of or disregard for basic human biology. Catholic politicians who oppose laws that offer protection for the unborn cannot honestly claim that it is their intention to defend the weak and the and vulnerable. To do so represents glaring hypocrisy of the part of Catholic politicians. I am surprised that Appleby did not recognize such a gaping hole in the integrity of what was otherwise such a well-reasoned argument.…

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The Tightly Wrapped Gifts of Father Thaddeus

By Sue Marquette Poremba

My knees shook when I rang the doorbell of the rectory. I’d never met Father Thaddeus before, but I had heard stories from my aunts. Rough, they said. Mean sometimes. Definitely scary.

“You don’t want to talk to him, Suzy,” my aunt said. “Find someone else.”

Except in my little town, there was no one else to talk to if you needed a priest.…

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A Look at the New World

By Robert Schmuhl ’70

For an unworldly Hoosier boy, the prospect of going to Europe sounded romantic and adventurous. Back in the 1960s, Notre Dame began to develop its first study-abroad programs—there are now some 20 possibilities—and the one based in Angers, France, started in 1966, the fall of my freshman year. So that semester I enrolled in a class with what you might call zero-based understanding of the French language. Sans an iota of previous instruction, I dreamily hoped I could conjugate enough verbs to spend sophomore year in France.

I'm now convinced a mother's prayers rather than linguistic mastery sent me across the Atlantic the following August. The word callow grossly understates how at least one 18-year-old felt during the initial weeks of innocence abroad.…

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Into Thin Air

By David Devine '94

On assignment with the Peace Corps in Bolivia, Walter Poirier ‘00 mysteriously vanished, leaving no clues, a pall of unanswered questions and a wide circle of loved ones who cannot believe he’s gone.

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Anyone and Everyone, It Seems, Can Be Famous

By Andrew H. Malcolm

My earliest brushes with fame were decidedly nondescript. In a restaurant one distant day during my childhood an old man stopped by our table to inform my parents that I was without a doubt the best behaved little boy he had seen in a long while.

This caused much parental excitement because, I was later informed, the old guy was the famous Secretary of the U.S. Treasury Department. I knew treasures from pirate tales, but treasuries meant little. (And he clearly did not know my other behavior.) Meeting famed Satchel Paige, however, in the bullpen of Fenway Park was quite something else because he was famous to me. I knew his name.…

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