News » Archives » 2005

I Will Hear God

By Nancy Mairs

“I think,” I said suddenly to my husband several years ago, “that I’m supposed to go to theological seminary.” I did? If so, this was the first I’d heard of it. In Berkeley for a reading at a bookstore, we were stroll/rolling through the university campus on a mild November afternoon, and I suppose the proximity of the Graduate Theological Union had crossed my mind. Still, I’d been here any number of times without a stray thought for the GTU

Read More

Preparing the Way of the Lord

By John Monczunski

Mike Buckler was a little late for work one morning at South Bend’s Chapin Street Clinic. As he hung up his coat, he smiled at the lone woman sitting in the waiting room of the free health clinic.

“I just said ‘Hi, how are ya?’ and she immediately started bawling,” Buckler recalls. When he sat down next to the woman, the story gushed out. The day before, her son had been sentenced to life in prison. She came to the clinic because throughout her son’s trial she had been experiencing chest pains from all the stress.…

Read More

A Brief History of Gibraltar

By Ed Cohen

Thanks to the logo of the Prudential Insurance Company (“Get a Piece of the Rock.”) many Americans imagine Gibraltar to be an island. It isn’t.

It’s the tip of a narrow peninsula on which stands the famous 1,400-foot-high chunk of Jurassic limestone, symbol of strength and stability. Bare on one side but largely covered with wild olive trees, petal cactus and other vegetation everywhere else, the Rock of Gibraltar is believed to have been formed by the collision of the Eurasian and African tectonic plates some 55 million years ago.…

Read More

Monkeys on the Rock

By Ed Cohen

gibpix.jpg

According to legend, if the ravens ever disappear from the Tower of London both the tower and the British kingdom will crumble. And so, at the venerable stone compound in the center of London one of the colorful Yeoman Warders or Beefeaters (familiar to drinkers of the gin brand of the same name) is appointed Ravenmaster. It’s his job to feed and care for a flock of at least six of the traditionally ill-boding black birds so they always feel welcome.…

Read More

The Pastoral Presidency of Monk Malloy

By Walton Collins '51

monkpix.jpg

On June 1, 1987, the day he officially became the 16th president of Notre Dame, Monk Malloy was more than half a world away, wrapping up a three-day visit in the Tibetan city of Lhasa. Which is to say he was on a 12,000-foot mountain in a part of the world so remote that only a few years earlier U.S. travel agents were discouraging travelers from going there. And he was feeling a lot better.…

Read More

Flying with Monk

By Kerry Temple ’74

Back in 1993 the editor of this magazine, Walt Collins ‘51, asked me to write about Father Monk Malloy, CSC, University president. It is not an easy task, writing about the person who is ultimately your boss in a manner appropriate for this magazine.

Now, in a reversal, I asked Walt to profile Monk as he nears the end of his remarkable, 18-year tenure as president of this University. Monk will step down this summer, leaving the presidency to John Jenkins, CSC

Read More

Charlie Weis: Man on the Spot

By im Donaldson '73

weis.jpg

He’s a Notre Dame man, but he’s a Jersey Guy. That means he often punctuates his sentences with “OK.” OK? That could just generally be a Jersey Guy sort of thing, or it could be something he picked up specifically from another Jersey Guy by the name of Duane Charles “Bill” Parcells, who went to high school in Oradell and eventually made his way to the NFL

Read More

Read and Drive toward Hope

By Richard Shannon '74

As far as I knew, 16-year-old Isaac was looking for drug deals, crap games and ways to build up his towering physique. The only class that seemed to grab him was physical education; my class in reading held little interest. Isaac seemed the least likely of my students to ask for my help in a spiritual journey.…

Read More

Editor's Note

By Kerry Temple ’74

I suppose I have now lived long enough to see how we become products of the era in which we come of age.

My parents grew up during the Depression, and the hardships of that epoch have never left them. They were young adults during World War II. My mother worked at a USO canteen and watched all the young men she knew go off to war. My father was a member of that “greatest generation,” serving his country in Asia, wearing his uniform on his wedding day. The experiences and memories of these times shaped their principles, ideals and values.…

Read More

Time tags professor a future leader

By Notre Dame Magazine

Father Virgilio Elizondo, associate director of the Institute for Latino Studies and a visiting professor of theology, is one of the nation’s leading spiritual innovators, according to Time magazine.

Time has been running a series of articles spotlighting men and women in 18 fields who the magazine feels are likely to be especially influential in the future.…

Read More

Website changes

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

While the magazine you’re holding circled through the presses last month, ink pressing on the white paper, a separate piece also was taking shape. With zeros and ones – the language of computers – the web issue of this magazine was formatted.

Notre Dame Magazine has been on the web almost six years. Until now, it’s followed the format of the print issue closely. Every three months, a selection of stories from the most recent issue was posted on the web for anyone to read. We also offered various services: With one click, viewers could request a sample copy, alumni could send in a change of address, readers could e-mail a letter to the editor, freelance writers could download our writers’ guidelines.…

Read More

First female student body president elected

By Megan Strader '01

It took nearly 30 years, but Notre Dame finally has its first female student body president.

Junior Brooke Norton, this past year’s student body vice president, took office April 1 along with running mate Brian Moscona, a sophomore. They won 56 percent of the vote in a run-off election in February.

“I hope I was elected as the best person for the job, but I am extremely honored to be the first woman for the job,” Norton said.…

Read More

Another first

By Notre Dame Magazine

1999 saw the first African-American leprechaun, 2000 the first female Irish Guard member. This year: the first African-American drum major.

Read More

First female student body president elected

By Megan Strader '01

femprez

It took nearly 30 years, but Notre Dame finally has its first female student body president.

Junior Brooke Norton, this past year’s student body vice president, took office April 1 along with running mate Brian Moscona, a sophomore. They won 56 percent of the vote in a run-off election in February.…

Read More

Who wants to be a theater donor?

By Notre Dame Magazine

Regis Philbin ‘53, host of ABC’s Who Wants to Be a Millionaire and Live! with Regis and Kelly, has donated $2.75 million to create the Regis Philbin Studio Theater in the Marie P. DeBartolo Center for the Performing Arts, planned for the south end of campus.

The 100-seat theater will be the home of lab and performance-art productions. Construction on the performing arts center is scheduled to begin later this year and be completed in 2003.…

Read More

Block that parasite

By Notre Dame Magazine

Biologist John H. Adams has been awarded a U.S patent for the potential use of a protein molecule he discovered. The molecule could be used in the world’s first vaccine against malaria.

Read More

Calling teen mothers

By Notre Dame Magazine

More than 500 adolescent mothers will carry wireless phones day and night during a new nationwide study so researchers can find out instantly what the teens are doing in caring for their babies.

The five-year project, directed by John Borkowski, McKenna Family Professor of Psychology, aims to predict child neglect and also develop strategies to improve cognitive and emotional development in children born to adolescent mothers.…

Read More

It's a dance, it's a fight

By John Monczunski

Capoeira (pronounced kah-po-AE-rrrrah) is: A. the newest latte from Starbucks; B. the Mafia’s term for a hitman; or C. the Brazilian answer to tai-chi.

If your final answer is C, you may go to the head of Greg Downey’s class, where the Notre Dame assistant professor of anthropology will teach you, among other things, Portugese songs and how to play the berimbau, a single-string, bow-like percussion instrument with a gourd on one end. Both the singing and playing are essential to the Afro-Brazilian martial art, which is the object of Downey’s scholarly research and one of his hobbies.…

Read More

A taste of poverty

By Ed Cohen

Students sat on the floor of the South Dining Hall drinking water and eating rice with no utensils.

They weren’t being punished. They were volunteers selected to eat as the world’s poor eat at an awareness-raising Hunger Banquet last fall.

Exactly 200 students, faculty and staff participated in the program, which involved each person being handed one of three colored cards that determined their place in the world’s pecking order for the meal. Fifty-five percent received green cards, signifying the 55 percent of the world’s people whose diet is limited mainly to rice and water.…

Read More

ND-Saint Mary's marriages dwindling

By Ed Cohen

Coeducation at Notre Dame has lessened the cross-highway marital pairings of Saint Mary’s and ND students.

An analysis by Paul Perl ‘00Ph.D. shows that the percentage of women in each Saint Mary’s graduating class marrying Notre Dame graduates rose fairly steadily from 1950 until around 1972, the advent of coeducation. At that point, more than 1 in 4 Saint Mary’s graduates were taking their vows with Notre Dame men.…

Read More

The few, the serious, the well-read

By Notre Dame Magazine

Department chair Clark Power’s description makes it sound like a student’s dream.

“There are absolutely no lectures,” he says. “The teacher’s role is to ask questions and facilitate the discussion but not to be an expert. There is absolutely no lecturing allowed.”

Power is talking about the Program of Liberal Studies’ seminar, the four-credit Great Books course that’s required of the program’s students each semester. What he adds, however, is that the students have to be ready to mix it up intellectually and the writing demands are rigorous. And the reading list takes you on a three-year tour of the greatest minds in history: Aristotle, Plato, Augustine, Aquinas, Shakespeare, Confucius, Lao-Tzu, Nietzsche, Dostoevski, Darwin, Marx and many others.…

Read More

Campus construction roundup

By Megan Strader '01

One new campus building opened this spring while the status of several other construction projects ranges from conception to completion.

At the site of the original Notre Dame Hammes Bookstore now stands a much larger, $14 million gothic structure housing the Coleman Family Center for Campus Ministry and the James and Leah Rae Morse Center for Academic Services. Expected to open in April, the building has separate entrances for the Coleman Center facing the South Quad and for the Morse Center facing the lakes.…

Read More

Being a good neighbor

By Notre Dame Magazine

Notre Dame is helping spur revitalization of the Northeast Neighborhood south of campus and has opened a community center in the former Goodwill store near the intersection of Eddy Street and South Bend Avenue. But those aren’t the only town-gown collaborations. Some other new and continuing efforts:…

Read More

Toward a College Town with Care

By Ed Cohen

For much of its history Notre Dame kept its students cloistered.

When Father William Corby, CSC, first was president, 1866-72, students were forbidden from leaving the grounds without the permission of the president, vice president or prefect of discipline. In the 1920s students weren’t allowed to drive automobiles, and priests patrolled sections of downtown that were ruled off-limits.…

Read More

Deaths in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine

ARTHUR J. QUIGLEY ’41Ph.D, who taught electrical engineering at Notre Dame for more than 50 years and whose devotion to the “northeast neighborhood” where he and his family lived south of campus was legendary, died in December at age 86. Originally from Boston, Quigley was the brother of the late Carroll Quigley, a famous Georgetown University historian who was a mentor to Bill Clinton. He joined the Notre Dame engineering faculty during World War II after earning a doctorate in physics from the University. Quigley was an able teacher and generous with his time. He insisted that the salary for his final semester of teaching, thought to have been 1993, be used to establish a student scholarship. Away from campus the professor devoted countless hours to helping others in simple ways. In the words of a friend, “He didn’t talk it so much as he lived it.” He would visit the homebound, served as a communion minister and was a constant presence, along with his wife, Arlene, in Saint Joseph Parish. He also became one of the one of the most passionate and persistent advocates for South Bend’s Northeast Neighborhood, where he lived for half a century. President of the Northeast Neighborhood Council for more than 20 years, he spent countless evenings in the neighborhood center and at the homes of neighbors helping with problems. He was relentless in recruiting others at Notre Dame to the cause of helping those less fortunate in the vicinity of campus. Quigley’s community service was recognized by many awards, including the Center City Association Downtown Recognition Award, the Hometown Heroes Award and Notre Dame’s Reinhold Niebuhr Award for social justice work and writing. A room in Notre Dame’s new Community Learning Center in the neighborhood is named in his memory.…

Read More

Domers in the News, Spring 2001

By Notre Dame Magazine

Condoleezza Rice ’75M.A. has been appointed national security adviser to President Bush. She served as Bush’s primary foreign affairs adviser during the campaign. The former Stanford University provost stepped down from her position on the Notre Dame Board of Trustees and all other boards. . . . Townsend Lange McNitt ’93J.D.

Read More

A&L faculty tops in NEH fellowships

By Notre Dame Magazine

Faculty in the College of Arts and Letters won more National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships this past year — five — than faculty of any other university. The number was as many as Harvard, Stanford and Michigan combined.

The nationally competitive grants allow faculty to take a year off to write a book or work on some other major project. Notre Dame pays the difference between the grant amount and their annual salary.…

Read More

Seen and Heard, Spring 2001

By Notre Dame Magazine

Notre Dame is suing the companies responsible for the design, construction and plumbing work in the addition to Notre Dame Stadium. The University wants the companies to pay the cost of fixing cracks and other problems that became evident soon after the stadium expansion was completed in 1997. No specific dollar amount is attached to the suit because repairs are continuing and the bills are still accumulating. . . . The final total for contributions to the Generations campaign was $1.061 billion. The campaign’s goal was $767 million. . . . Of universities that play big-time college football and play it well, Notre Dame is among the very best at graduating players. Last year’s late-season Bowl Championship Series computer rankings showed just how different Notre Dame is. The rankings identified the Irish as the nation’s 11th-best football team at the time, but the University’s average graduation rate placed it No. 1 among the top 15. Eighty-two percent of Notre Dame players enrolled between 1990 and 93 graduated. That was 23 percentage points better than the second-best university, Florida State, and 77 points better than last season’s eventual national champion, Oklahoma. . . . A group of undergraduates from Notre Dame, Boston University and the University of Toronto have launched what they hope will become a worldwide student organization focusing on such bioethics issues as the Human Genome Project, stem cell research and cloning. The International Student Bioethics Initiative convened its inaugural meeting in March at Notre Dame in conjunction with the third-annual National Undergraduate Bioethics Conference. For more information on the group, e-mail isbib@hotmail.com. . . . While the website of Notre Dame’s Philosophy Club was under construction, its home page tells visitors, “Stay tuned for something better than this. In the meanwhile, go sit in a corner and think about the meaning of life.” . . . The men’s ultimate Frisbee team goes by the name Papal Rage. . . . Winter was especially somber on campus this year. At the end of January two young people — Zahm Hall junior Conor Murphy (see “Letter from Campus”) and Scott Delgadillo, a 14-year-old from San Diego — both succumbed to leukemia within a few days of each other. Delgadillo visited campus the weekend of the Purdue game last September courtesy of the Make-A-Wish Foundation. He met the players and coaches and at Coach Davie’s suggestion addressed the crowd at the pep rally. The teen inspired everyone with his courage and determination. Later, in a letter to The Observer

Read More

Guidance counselors' regret

By Notre Dame Magazine

The college that high school guidance counselors most often say they wish they’d attended is Notre Dame.

That’s one of the findings from a nationwide survey published in Kaplan/Newsweek College Catalog 2001, a compendium of admissions information for 1,100 colleges and universities.

The survey asked counselors from public and private high schools a variety of targeted questions. When asked where they would go if they could repeat their college years, they most frequently cited Notre Dame.…

Read More