News » Archives » 2005

One book to go, please

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

compbk

Okay, so your name isn’t J.K. Rowling or Stephen King or Shelby Foote. None of your friends or relatives works for Random House. And finding an agent seems as convoluted a process as counting votes in Florida.

Richard H. Rupp ’56, ’57M.A. knows that story. The recently retired Appalachian State University English professor has published several nonfiction books. But when he finished his first novel, the travails began. “I got nowhere with 14 or 16 different publishers,” he says.…

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Web Extra: More letters to the editor

By Liquid error: internal

“The Good Book” a good thing

The Spring 2001 issue contained an article by Richard Shannon 1974 titled The Good Book. It was almost too good to be true and too good not to be true. The article was enlightening and encouraging in a time when the scoffers have seemed to have gained ascendancy. Throughout the years the magazine continues to get better. The Good Book stands as one of the best.…

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Letters: from print issue

By Liquid error: internal

SMC Stereotype

As a Saint Mary’s graduate about to marry a Notre Dame man, I was interested to see your article on ND-SMC marriages in the spring issue. I was horrified, however, at the conclusions. How ridiculous to assume that the declining rate is “at the expense of Saint Mary’s women.” Rather, I find it heartening that since Notre Dame went coed in 1972, Saint Mary’s women have had a broader world available to them upon graduation. These women scatter across the globe for successful careers, challenging graduate programs and generous volunteer work. I would hardly call that a loss. Such articles just foster the stereotype that Saint Mary’s women are there to pursue a husband rather than an education, and it is disappointing that you printed it.…

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Mickey Mouse research

By John Monczunski

Don Crafton won’t be insulted if you call his research “Mickey Mouse.” But more accurately it’s “Mickey Mouse and beyond.”

The chairman of Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television and Theatre is analyzing animated films from the 1930s, when the Disney studio achieved dominance in the industry. The resulting book, funded by a grant from the Motion Picture Academy, is expected to be titled In the Shadow of the Mouse,

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Second-chance sunblock

By Notre Dame Magazine

sunblock

A team of chemists at Notre Dame has synthesized an enzyme that they say could undo sun damage to skin — even years after exposure — and prevent the development of skin cancer.

The enzyme targets a cancer-triggering molecule that forms in DNA after exposure to ultraviolet radiation. So far the researchers have evidence that the enzyme can recognize and break up the molecule outside of DNA

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Problems with corrections

By Ed Cohen

Imagine a country where criminals are kept in prisons close to their homes, the inmates have TVs in their rooms, even their sexual partners are allowed to visit them in private.

In such a country, you’d think people might be lining up to get incarcerated. But as a prisoner rights advocate explained at a conference on campus this spring, in the country in question, Sweden, the imprisonment rate is 64 per 100,000 people. In the United States, home of “the slammer,” the rate is more than 10 times greater — 690 per 100,000, the advocate said.…

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Web Extra: Vice squad photos

By Matt Cashore '94

A group of students revived the 1980s TV show Miami Vice Squad when they dressed like squad members during a dance. Photographer Matt Cashore documents their “raid” of a residence hall, as the squad provides an impromptu study break with their bullhorn and boombox.

{{ site.gallery.miami | gallery_list }}…

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Business plan winners

By Notre Dame Magazine

An on-line service for ordering replacement parts for consumer durables like lawnmowers and kitchen appliances won the $20,000 grand prize in the inaugural business plan competition of the Gigot Center for Entrepreneurial Studies.

The winning entry, PartScope, is the brainchild of student Christopher Ladd ’02, Stephen Colucci ’75Ph.D. and D. Scott Null. Second-place and a $2,000 award went to Smart Surfaces, a patented surface coating for ship and power plants that resists marine organisms like barnacles. Three other finalists received $1,000 each. The plans were judged on their likelihood of success. At least one member of each team had to be a Notre Dame student or alumnus.…

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Vice Squad rocks campus

By Megan Strader '01

vice2

Late evening on a chilly day in March, four students clad in dazzling white suits, sky blue T-shirts and sunglasses stroll incongruously across the winter-dreary South Quad.

“It’s okay,” announces one of them through a bullhorn, “we’re Miami Vice!”

Actually, they’re members of the Notre Dame Vice Squad, on their way to “raid” a female dorm, Lewis Hall, their fourth this year.…

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Nice night for parietals protest

By Notre Dame Magazine

An estimated 300 students spent all or part of the pleasant night of April 30 camped out on the South Quad. They were protesting the adminis- tration’s opposition to extending late-night visiting hours or parietals.

Students organized the protest after the Campus Life Council, composed of student representatives, rectors and a representative from student affairs, approved a resolution to allow visitors of the opposite sex to be in dorm rooms an hour earlier in the morning. But the group narrowly defeated a proposal to extend visiting hours by an hour at night on weekdays.…

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Adidas allegiance

By Ed Cohen

adidas

Adidas, which has been supplying footwear to Notre Dame teams since 1997, will now make their uniforms too.

The University announced it has entered into a five-year agreement under which all 26 varsity men’s and women’s teams will begin wearing both adidas shoes and apparel this fall. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.…

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Irish sports teams rank high

By Notre Dame Magazine

2000-2001 may have been the best year ever for Notre Dame athletics in terms of across-the-board success. In the month of April, Fighting Irish teams went a combined 66-8.

Below are the highest national rankings achieved by this year’s varsity teams at any point during the season:
1 — Women’s basketball* (national champion; senior center Ruth Riley was consensus national Player of the Year)…

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"Rudy" more popular than "Rockne"

By Notre Dame Magazine

Rudy finished in a tie with Raging Bull for 10th place in a USA Today poll of readers’ favorite sports movies.

Nos. 1 through 9: Hoosiers, Field of Dreams, The Natural, Rocky, Bull Durham, Brian’s Song, Caddyshack, Chariots of Fire, Slapshot.

1940’s Knute Rockne, All American didn’t crack the top 25.…

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Devine not the devil "Rudy" suggests

By Ed Cohen

rudy

Anyone who has seen the movie Rudy (and who hasn’t?) knows Dan Devine is a jerk.

You’d think so, anyway, by the way the former coach is portrayed.

In the movie, it is cold-hearted Coach Devine who refuses to let plucky walk-on Daniel “Rudy” Ruettiger ’76 live out his dream by dressing for a Notre Dame game. He only relents when faced with a player revolt.…

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University joins workers' rights group

By Notre Dame Magazine

In its latest move to fight sweatshop production of college logo sweatshirts and other apparel, Notre Dame has joined the Worker Rights Consortium.

The WRC, which activist students had urged the University to unite with, is a non-profit group of colleges and universities workers, and nongovernmental organizations that seeks to improve the conditions of workers producing collegiate apparel using the leverage of licensing agreements.…

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Getting the fountain rolling

By Ed Cohen

fountain

Few people can resist touching the Kugel ball fountain on the first floor of the Coleman-Morse building.

The fountain is the centerpiece of the building, which opened earlier this year on the site of the former Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore. The 30-inch granite sphere rolls continually on a thin layer of water that also keeps the rock shiny and wet. The water is forced upward by one of two jets, which alternate every few minutes to change the ball’s rotation. Though it floats continually, the sphere would be nearly impossible to dislodge from its concave base by hand because it weighs 1,300 pounds, according to Dave Mateja ‘92, one of the building’s architects. He works for the S/L/A/M Collaborative of Glastonbury, Connecticut, headed by James McManus ’66.…

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Hall to be named for Father Malloy

By Notre Dame Magazine

The new philosophy and theology building, between Decio and O’Shaugnessy halls, will be called Edward A. Malloy, CSC, Hall.

Naming the building for President Malloy was the wish of the person whose gift underwrote its construction — Donald R. Keough, chairman emeritus of the Board of Trustees.

Keough was among the trustees who selected Malloy as president in 1986. He said he had seen Malloy’s legacy as leader of the University take shape, and he and his family were “pleased that his name will identify the theology and philosophy center at Notre Dame.” The building is scheduled to open this fall.…

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Another president visits campus

By Notre Dame Magazine

Patricio Aylwin Azócar, who became Chile’s first democratically elected president in 1989, received the second Notre Dame Prize for Distinguished Public Service in Latin America. The award, presented to Azócar in a ceremony in the Main Building rotunda in April, was established with support from The Coca-Cola Company. It carries a cash prize of $10,000 with an equal sum given to a Latin American charitable organization of the recipient’s choice.…

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Unique Valedictorian

By Notre Dame Magazine

For the first time in memory, and probably the first time in school history, Notre Dame’s valedictorian was a transfer student.

Carolyn Weir was also unusual in that she was co-valedictorian at Greensburg (Pennsylvania) Central Catholic High School with Brian O’Donoghue ‘01, Notre Dame’s student body president this past year.…

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Laetare medal to labor priest

By Notre Dame Magazine

Monsignor George G. Higgins, scholar, activist and foremost “labor priest” of the Catholic church in the United States, was awarded this year’s Laetare Medal at commencement.

Throughout his career, Higgins has been a forceful and occasionally controversial advocate of organized labor, often appearing on picket lines to rally and support striking workers. He was a participant and speaker at the first congress of Solidarity in Poland.…

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Honorary degree recipients 2001

By Notre Dame Magazine

Joining President Bush as honorary-degree recipients at commencement were these nine other distinguished individuals:

— John Bahcall, astrophysicist and Richard Black Professor of Natural Sciences at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. He has done seminal work on detecting solar neutrinos, developing a comprehensive model of the Milky Way Galaxy, and advocacy, planning and use of the Hubble Space Telescope.…

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All the presidents’ visits

By Richard Conklin

reagan

It was during the March 1975 visit of President Gerald Ford to Notre Dame that we learned how dangerous it is to sup with the leader of the free world.

At a dinner for Midwest governors atop the Memorial Library, a Secret Service man stationed at the door to the holding kitchen watched as wait staff brought out the entrees. “That one,” he said randomly, and the plate toward which he had nodded was served to President Ford. In short, if you intended to poison the president, you had to poison everyone.…

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Deaths in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine

FATHER ANTHONY J. LAUCK, CSC, ‘42, whose statue of Our Lady of the University welcomes visitors to campus at the Main Circle and who was a pioneering figure in art at Notre Dame and within the Holy Cross community, died in April at age 92. His many campus works also include a massive replica of his statue of the Visitation on the south side of the Eck Visitors’ Center, and the Basilica of the Sacred Heart’s statue of Blessed Brother Andre Bessette, CSC

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Web Extra Seen and Heard

By Notre Dame Magazine

Club sports athletes are always unsung, so let’s sing about a couple here from this past year: Freshman Leigh Hellrung took gold in both the slalom and giant slalom at the Midwest Collegiate Snowsports Association Divisionals and then won silver in the slalom and gold in the giant slalom at the MCSA Regionals. At the latter she competed against skiers from six varsity teams ranked in top 20 nationally. Senior Tes Salb

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Seen and Heard Around Campus

By Notre Dame Magazine

The lead advance agent for the Secret Service team that protected President Bush during his commencement visit was Cornelius Southall ‘89, who played free safety on Notre Dame’s 1988 national championship football team. Four other Notre Dame alumni in the Secret Service were part of the detail: Troy Wilson ‘87,who played cornerback for the Irish; and from the agency’s Chicago office, Sheila Horox ‘87, R.G. Starmann ’93, ’97MBA and Tim Gilroy ’94. Domers have long been popular with the feds. When J. Edgar Hoover ran the FBI

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Study break -- cover your eyes

By Ed Cohen

runners

It was on for tonight, the source on my voice-mail said, 10:30, second floor.

So here we were, me and photographer Lou Sabo, on the second floor of Hesburgh Library, the Tuesday of finals week, spring 2001, trying to record for posterity one of Notre Dame’s less-storied and probably never-before-photographed-for-publication traditions: the Bun Run.…

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Web extra- Catholic Schools: A place with spiritual moorings

By Sister Mary Brian Costello, RSM, '57M.A.

“It’s thirteen o’clock.” George Orwell proclaimed that in 1984. What time is it now for Catholic schools? The frequency of school closure announcements stirs an uneasy sense in me that time may gradually run out for Catholic schools. As a former superintendent of Catholic schools in a large urban archdiocese, I deplore this diminished presence of the Catholic Church’s investment in the future.…

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Tigers and Hawk

By Brian Doyle ’78

I am standing in the hospital watching babies emerge from my wife like a circus act. First one out is a boy, dark-haired and calm, the size of an owl. He is immediately commandeered by a nurse who whisks him off for a bath and a stint in what appears to be tiny tanning bed.

Now, says the doctor, reaching inside my wife while he talks, here’s the other one, and he hauls out another boy. This one is light-haired and not calm; he grabs for a nurse’s scissors and won’t let go and they have to pry his fingers off and the nurse looks accusingly at me for some reason.…

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A dot.com liquidation tale

By Christy Conklin '88

business

On January 18 I walked into my office at ebeon Ltd. in New York City to find everyone gathered in the unfinished conference room listening to a phone call from our managing director in Ireland. He told us that the company had missed payroll, that there would be no severance pay and that no one was quite sure what has happened to our 401k deposits. The telephone was sitting on the edge of the table, stretched as far as possible from the wall. This was fitting because, despite the fact that we were given state-of-the-art global cell phones, no one had gotten around to buying an extension cord. The upshot of the conversation was that eircom, the majority owner of our Dublin-based e-commerce architecture firm, had just had a board meeting and decided not to give our company a new round of financing. Ebeon had ceased to exist.…

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