News » Archives » 2005

The Hidden Life of Woodrow Baker

By Patricia Booker

Woodrow Baker uses a wooden spoon to prop open his door on the days when he knows I’m coming. That way he doesn’t have to hobble over on his scratched wooden cane to let me in. He can stay leaning on his bed, gazing out the 10th floor window and listening to talk radio, where he learns a lot about the world. Just recently he learned that Hillary Clinton might well be a lesbian.…

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A swing at success for Tom Coyne

By Tom Coyne '97, '99MFA

coynebk

Dear Notre Dame Magazine:

My name is Tom Coyne and several years ago I sent you a profile I had written. Wisely and mercifully, you guys rejected my story, a loquacious, wandering and rather uninteresting piece of writing. I was a senior then and taking Walt Collins’s “writing for publication” class. It was a wonderful class, and I am grateful to Professor Collins for steering me toward a writing competition in Indianapolis that fall. I was fortunate that something else I’d written won the Keating Writing Challenge and appeared in the Indianapolis Star

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Who's to blame when schools fail?

By Ed Cohen

kidsleep

Once upon a time there was a village with a bakery famous for its delicious pumpkin pies. The villagers took pride in their bakery, and rightly so. It really was their bakery. They owned it jointly, and the surrounding farms supplied all the pumpkins that went into the pies. People came from all around to buy the pies, and the village prospered.…

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Seen and Heard web extra

By Chas Grundy

As is the case at many businesses, to make an outside call from a Notre Dame telephone, you have to dial 9 first. But so many people accidentally dial 9-1-1 (which connects to campus Security/Police emergency) that telephone users are being asked to dial 8 instead of 9. For now both 8 or 9 work, but starting in September, only 8 will. . . . Speaking of numbers,…

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Seen and heard on campus

By Chas Grundy

The new pope once had the chance to become a professor at Notre Dame. In the early 1960s President Hesburgh wrote to Father Joseph Ratzinger—then an up-and-coming German theologian—inviting him to join the faculty as a visiting professor or permanent member of the faculty. Hesburgh was scouring the world for prospects in his quest to bolster Notre Dame's theology faculty. Speaking with reporters shortly after Ratzinger's election as Pope Benedict XVI, Hesburgh said the German scholar wrote back saying he'd love to come and teach at Notre Dame but he didn't think his English was good enough. . . . Organizers of the Bengal Bouts…

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Deaths in the Notre Dame Family

By Chas Grundy

ABBOT ASTRIK L. GABRIEL, who directed Notre Dame's Medieval Institute from 1952 to 1975, died May 16, 2005, in Dujarie House at Holy Cross College. He was 97. A distinguished figure on campus, Gabriel spoke English with a thick Hungarian accent and booming voice. With an air of aristocracy, the internationally respected scholar was a connoisseur of fine food and wine who was known by sommeliers, chefs and _maitre d's_ from South Bend to New York to Paris. One of the world's foremost authorities on medieval education, Gabriel was born in Pecs, Hungary, entered religious life with the Order of Canons of Premontre in 1926, and joined the Notre Dame faculty in 1948. Gabriel wrote numerous books and articles on medieval university life and oversaw the Notre Dame's Frank M. Folsom Ambrosiana Collection, an unprecedented microfilm reproduction of all the manuscripts and drawings of the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan. The Astrik L. Gabriel University Collection, including numerous books he donated, is among the world's richest library collections on the history of universities. During his Notre Dame tenure, Gabriel also served as a visiting professor at Harvard, was twice a member of Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study, was a member of French, Bavarian and Hungarian Academies of Science, and was decorated by France, Italy and the Holy See.

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The storybook season: Women's basketball at ND

By David Haugh

Tears smeared the yellow paint that covered 8-year-old Tim Heisler’s face.

Halftime of the NCAA Women’s Basketball semifinal game last March 30 at the Savvis Center in Saint Louis, and Notre Dame trailed Connecticut by 12. This was not how Tim envisioned his hero, Ruth Riley, hanging up her headband for good.…

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Web Extra: Alumni Service profiles

By Sean O'Brien '86 arch

Dr. Jeffrey DeMartino ’84 broke his jaw as a student participating in Notre Dame’s Bengal Bouts. After graduation he went on to become a dentist and has continued his interest in boxing, working with professional boxers to develop safer mouth guards. The New Jersey dentist has invented a new mouth guard that allows any athlete using it to breathe through the device without opening his mouth. Profits from sales of the mouth guard, called the Bengal Bite, are donated to Holy Cross missions in Bangladesh.…

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An Association Serious About Service

By John Monczunski

The Notre Dame Club of Staten Island has collected over 300,000 nonperishable food items in nine years of its annual food drive. Meanwhile, the Tax Assistance Program of the Black Hills ND Club realized over $32,000 in tax savings for families in need last year, while the Minnesota Notre Dame Club mobilized 75 volunteers for a Christmas holiday party for 700 inner-city young people.…

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"You Just Wonder About God's Call"

By Melinda Henneberger '80

The plan was that I could finish my newspaper story, be in the cab by 5 and still make my 6:30 plane to South Bend for the “Day of Reflection” about what the volunteer experiences many of us had after leaving Notre Dame mean later, 20 years later in my case. What difference had it made in my carpooling, deadline-crashing, tall-skim-latte guzzling everyday life?…

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In Business to Help

By Calvin J. Cohen

Occasionally during a long business career I would wonder whether what I was doing was at all beneficial to mankind. It might have been a stretch, but I could rationalize that by indirectly helping my company produce affordable apparel I was supplying one of people’s basic needs. I didn’t ponder the question very often because most of my time was divided between work and family. But when I retired after 40-plus years, I was able to revisit the question and maybe deal with it in a more honest and direct manner.…

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Their Own Amazing Grace

By Brendan Moore '98

It’s called the House of Charity, a place in Spokane, Washington, “for the homeless, for the hungry, for the hurting, for the naked, for the weary.” I went there right after graduation, having joined the Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) because I wasn’t sure what to do with my life and thought it’d be a challenging experience. It would also mean a journey to the great Northwest.…

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There Are Children Here

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

langford

Jill and James Langford laugh when they talk about buying their expansive grounds in the country, a few miles south of Notre Dame. “We moved out there to be private — to get away from it all,” says Jim ‘59, an adjunct assistant professor in ND’s core course and former director of Notre Dame Press. Jill ’80, the owner of publishing company Diamond Communications, nods in agreement. “We had moved out here to do our own thing,” she says, “and felt a bit selfish.”…

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The Orphans of Premananda

By John Monczunski and Mary Elizabeth Calabrese Levins

leafcard

Jon James ‘64 knows firsthand that an ordinary person can make a difference. Seventy orphans in southern India have a roof over their head, nutritious food to eat and educational opportunities, largely because of his efforts. The associate professor of English at Hawaii’s Chaminade University has raised much of the funds needed to construct and maintain the Premananda Orphanage Centre in Ongole, India.…

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The Not So Little Gift of Sight

By Richard J. Duffey. M.D., '79

Two patients in particular caught my attention today. One, a 10-year-old boy named Juan Elvis Jananpa, is blind in one eye and has limited vision in the other from an explosion when he was 7. We can fix the blind eye with cataract and lens implant techniques. Smiles abound all around when the translators explain this to his family.…

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A Home for New Beginnings

By John Monczunski

Standing at the kitchen counter in Maggie’s Place, Sarah tells her story matter-of-factly as she chops onions for an omelette. The details are daunting but told without self-pity. An opaque film covers her eyes but doesn’t impede her work. Her blindness, she explains as she deftly dices the onion, was the result of a doctor’s mistake at birth. Like many premature infants of her age she was treated with oxygen to prevent respiratory disease, and, like many who received too much oxygen, her retinas were severely damaged by the procedure. Gradually she lost her sight, until now she perceives only light.…

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Champion of the Dispossessed

By Ed Cohen

Mary Brosnahan ‘83 fishes a newspaper clipping out from under the many papers on her desk at the headquarters of New York City’s Coalition for the Homeless. It’s the front page from the previous day’s New York Daily News, showing a photo of a luxury hotel room and one of the tabloid’s trademark hysteria-inducing headlines: “Homeless — for $329 a night.”…

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Where Angels Dare to Tread

By Walton R. Collins '51

malachi

It’s lunchtime in a homelike residence on Cleveland’s near west side, and eight people are seated at the table. There’s a choice of two soups today, onion or shrimp-garlic. There’s also a baked tuna dish, some leafy salad with a selection of dressings, and either fruit pies or mint cookies for desert. Or both. Conversation is relaxed and cheerful, with a touch of family-style bantering and lots of compliments for the cook.…

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The Chalkboard That Is East Timor

By Dave Devine

The lesson is over for the day.

My students, 50 East Timorese children who have traveled to this decimated school for two weeks of English classes, are long gone. They have walked back to the church for noon prayer. Back to the mercado to barter over insufficient rice. Back to the cool acacia groves to harvest coffee beans. In the last few days I had joined them after the lesson for spirited games of futebol

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Blessed Are the Healers

By Mark Reynolds

Maurice Antoine’s feet are too bloated and misshapen to fit into socks. Wrapped in white muslin cloths, they look like canvas potato sacks on the floor of his shack in Haiti. From his bed, the 48-year-old plops each foot onto the sole of a giant sandal and fastens cargo-size Velcro straps. He stands up, slowly hoists his left leg forward and repeats the same motion with his right. Lumbering like an elephant, he steps out the door and onto a sunny footpath.…

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What You Do For the Least of These Strangers . . .

By Walton R. Collins '51

homeless

HERE’S what Bill Hahn ‘62 did between 5 and 6 o’clock on a Thursday evening in late March in his hometown of Cleveland: He let himself into an outbuilding on the grounds of Conversion of Saint Paul Shrine and began loading a van from a storeroom crammed with hooded sweatshirts, flannel shirts, heavy pants, knitted caps, gloves, socks, boots, scarves, blankets, sleeping bags and toiletries. Then he wrestled a large pot containing the steaming contents of 24 cans of pork and beans over the van’s tailgate. He hoped he calculated right and had enough supplies to see him over the next seven hours of his rounds to Cleveland’s invisible homeless, the ones who live under bridges and over city heating grates and along remote stretches of railroad track and in shadowy downtown doorways. Like every city of any size in this country, Cleveland has its share of such people; at least 2,000 of them, Hahn estimates. On this night he would scout out a few dozen of the 2,000 and do what he could to ease their hunger, offset the bitterness of a still-wintry night and, most importantly, offer his friendship.…

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Going for story

By Kerry Temple ’74

One of the best things about journalism is the field trips. You get to travel to different corners of the world, meet new people, have interesting conversations, get a taste of places you wouldn’t normally go.

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A notable essay

By Notre Dame Magazine

An essay by Kerry Temple, editor of Notre Dame Magazine, was chosen as one of the “Notable Essays of 2000,” a list published in The Best American Essays 2001. The Best American Series editor Robert Atwan made the selections.

His essay “The Geography of Grace,” appeared in the Autumn 2000 (Vol. 29, Number 3) issue of Notre Dame Magazine.…

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At home in the Monkeyhouse

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

monkey

Back in his days as an advertising copywriter, Pat Byrnes ‘81 worked on campaigns for Cheez Whiz, Coors, Cap’n Crunch and SpaghettiOs. Hardly food for the soul.

Today, however, the man with a droll sense of humor is happily feasting at the cartoonist table. Several of his cartoons have been published in The New Yorker

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A hard bounce to the screen

By John Monczunski

hardb

Dan Coyle’s book Hardball: A Season in the Projects, about Little League baseball in Chicago’s notorious Cabrini-Green public housing development, hit a home run when it was published in 1993. USA Today called it “an astonishing feat of eavesdropping on young boys’ games and fantasies and a hard-eyed, unsentimental look at Cabrini-Green.” The Chicago Tribune

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Web Extra: More letters to the editor

By Liquid error: internal

Kind words
For some time now I have been receiving Notre Dame Magazine. On every single occasion I have been impressed immensely by the material that is covered in that magazine. When I received the Summer 2001 issue, I could not resist writing to you any longer. It is an outstanding magazine. I particularly enjoyed the article on Presidents Notre Dame Has Known and also the outstanding articles on the outreach programs associated with graduates of the University of Notre Dame. The social Gospel was fully alive in this last issue. I write to you today simply to congratulate you on a work that is well, well done.…

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Letters: from print issue

By Liquid error: internal

Presidential visit
Maybe someday Father Edward Malloy, CSC, and the Board of Trustees will be ashamed, as I am now, about George W. Bush being honored by a University that has long been an advocate for social justice. To many, this is not an act of nonpartisan graciousness. It is a public repudiation of a dozen papal encyclicals dating back to Pope Leo XIII

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Another Wreck Waiting to Happen

By Bryan Gruley '79

When I was 16, my father gave me his 1970 Oldsmobile Ninety Eight. It was midnight black with a blood-red pinstripe, power steering, power windows, power seats and 455 cubic inches of power under the hood. I could load that boat with six hockey players, all their gear and two cases of soda pop and it still sailed up Interstate 75 in Michigan at 100 mph.…

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Tracks Through Time

By Siobhan Carroll, '91

In my earliest memory, I am running. I take two or three jolting baby steps in the grass. The sun is shining on my face, and my hair, though brown, glows golden. I look through it at the bouncing grassy horizon of what I think is our neighbor’s yard. I somehow know that I am 2 years old. I do not remember why I am running; a 2-year-old hardly needs a reason. I am probably smiling; I may be laughing, too. The sun’s gold, the jolting steps, being 2 years old: it is a happy memory.…

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