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New homes by the Dome

By Ed Cohen

For the first time in memory, new houses are going up along Notre Dame Avenue.

Three faculty and one staff member are building homes on vacant lots along the gateway road south of campus. The spaces were sold to them by the University.

For more than a decade, Notre Dame has been buying up properties on the road between Angela Boulevard and South Bend Avenue as they’ve come on the market. Some of the houses have been refurbished and rented to faculty and staff. Others, beyond repair, were razed. That’s where the new houses are being built.…

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Seniors Face Tough Job Market

By Ed Cohen

As they walked together between rows of tables of recruiters at the Winter Career and Internship Fair in the Joyce Center Fieldhouse, Lucie Turcotte and fellow senior Courtney Gleason couldn’t help but think back a year. They were at another career fair on campus, this one geared to jobs for science majors like themselves. More than 50 companies and organizations were there recruiting.…

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Deaths in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine

Many who knew FATHER GEORGE H. MINAMIKI, S.J., ’77Ph.D., will find it hard to believe he’s gone, or that he was 82 years old when he passed away in January. “There was something eternal about him. He didn’t seem to age,” recalls longtime friend and colleague Yusaku Furuhashi, Herrick Foundation Professor of Marketing. The Jesuit priest started the Japanese language program and Japan Club at Notre Dame and guided the University’s Year-in-Japan program for many years. He died of a heart attack January 4 while visiting family in Los Angeles. In addition to his youthful appearance, Minamiki is remembered as someone who never talked about or called attention to himself. But he was a dedicated, able teacher and kind, someone who gave freely of his time to students and colleagues, even strangers. Born in Los Angeles to Japanese parents, Minamiki studied philosophy at UCLA

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine

William Mapother ’87 starred opposite Marisa Tomei as a sinister estranged husband in the Oscar-nominated movie In the Bedroom. He’d had smaller roles in earlier films, including Mission Impossible 2 and Swordfish. . . . Kristy (Zloch) Murphy ’96 plays reporter Katie Witt on NBC’s The West Wing. . . . Dan Kavanaugh ’93

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Seen and Heard: Web Extra

By Notre Dame Magazine

Notre Dame students usually get four days to study between the end of classes and the start of finals, but last fall they only got two. Finals started on Friday and Saturday, December 14 and 15, took a break on Sunday, and resumed on Monday for three consecutive days. Why the odd schedule? Because of a late start. The fall semester generally begins the third Tuesday in August, which happened to be August 21 this year. But an Academic Council rule stipulates that the semester can’t begin before August 22, the idea being that students wouldn’t time to finish internships, vacations, and the like. As a result, classes had to begin on the fourth Tuesday, August 28. There was no way to squeeze in enough class sessions during the semester without pushing back finals and cutting the study days. . . . Someone stole

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Seen and Heard Around Campus

By Notre Dame Magazine

The president of Mexico, Vicente Fox, will be the principal speaker at commencement in May 2002. After not having a female student body president for the first 29 years of coeducation, Notre Dame will soon have its second in a row. In February Libby Bishop, a junior majoring in psychology and economics, narrowly defeated a ticket headed by junior Brian Moscona, the vice president to incumbent barrier-breaker Brooke Norton ‘02. Bishop was born in South Bend but now lives in Ithaca, New York. . . . Plans are in the works

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Letter from Campus: Rude, Crude and as Popular as Ever

By Ed Cohen

Standing in the wings, Kevin Carney looked pleased as he watched the Keenan Revue Band and Keenan Revue Dancers rehearse the opening number for this year’s show.

The band pounded out its cover of “Basketcase,” and a dozen residents of the men’s dorm jogged on stage wearing T-shirts and warm-up pants. As part of the customary show-opener, off came the T-shirts, which were then rubbed front to back between their legs like floss between teeth. Several gyrations later, the routine led into pelvic thrusts.…

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A Magazine of Many Parts

By Kerry Temple ’74

The other day I was telling a friend about a person I admire. I summed it up by saying, “He is a man of many rooms.” My friend looked at me quizzically, and I tried to explain a concept that had come to me some years ago.

The idea emerged at a time I lived in a big three-story house and had kids to play with and dinners to cook and the occasional need to be alone. It seemed that different rooms required different roles and that filling those various roles enabled me to inhabit different parts of me.…

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John Riedl: The Power of Suggestion

By Ed Cohen

Your favorite movies are, in order, Freddy Got Fingered, Citizen Kane and The Little Mermaid.

Your favorite TV shows: Washington Week in Review and Championship Bull Riding.

If you could buy just one car, money being no object, it would be either a 2002 Lamborghini Diablo or an ’86 Dodge Caravan.

You probably are one of a kind. But there are others out there who share at least some of your tastes, and if you’re willing to reveal a few of them to John T. Riedl ‘83, he’ll find your soulmates. More importantly from a business standpoint, he’ll help introduce you to products and services your soulmates are buying.…

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Willingham Knows Opportunity Can Mean Everything

By Kelli Anderson

When Tyrone Willingham was playing football for Michigan State in the early 1970s, the team had a pact: so the coaches wouldn’t know they were dogging it in wind sprints, everyone agreed to run together. Well, almost everyone. “Ty wouldn’t do it,” recalls former MSU quarterback Charlie Baggett, now the receivers coach for the Minnesota Vikings. “He’d be out in front, and the coaches knew he wasn’t the fastest guy on the team. We’d tell him to slow down, but he wouldn’t. He’d look at us like we were crazy.”…

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An Anxious Reunion

By Ray Hedin

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My wife and I had come with the intention of sitting quietly in the back of the chapel. That seemed an accurate reflection of my present stance to the church — neither fully connected nor as completely dismissive as I once had been.

The problem was that there was no “back” to sit in. The old chapel, which had been reconfigured in the late 1960s to reflect Vatican II theology, had been reconfigured again. In the first reconfiguration, a new altar was placed closer to the congregation and faced the people, who sat on pews that stretched all the way to the rear of the chapel. With the second new look, in addition to these two altars, there was a simple wooden table at the center of the chapel, flanked by 50 comfortable, fabric-covered chairs, each half of the congregation facing the other — very good for a sense of intimacy and engagement, not so good for hiding.…

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PEAK: Time to Diversify

By Sean Callahan '87

Under his Holy Trinity High School polo shirt, part of the school’s uniform, freshman Jose often wears a turtleneck. That’s one way the 14-year-old, who recently emigrated from Ecuador, has learned to deal with Chicago winters.

This young man has had to adjust to many things since his arrival on Chicago’s West Side less than two years ago. Jose discovered the turtleneck on his own, but he relies on Miguel Hernandez, his Partnership to Educate and Advance Kids (PEAK

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PEAK Performance

By Sean Callahan '87

On a late fall day, Eileen Cavanaugh Bender ‘87 rode through Chicago’s West Side. Advertising sales executives like Bender, who works for Entertainment Weekly magazine, are a rare sight in this hardscrabble neighborhood.

The dishwater blonde with eyes that don’t take no for an answer pointed to a barren intersection where prostitutes openly court customers after nightfall. “Chantrelle says she knows some of the girls working there from grade school,” Bender said.…

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Song of Myself

By John Phillip Santos '79

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I originally cringed at the idea of calling my book a memoir. Hadn’t that always been the musty old grandfather’s shipping trunk of a genre, the woeful, and usually withering, genre of former heads of states, octogenarian politicians, ambassadors, admirals and assorted OBEs? It brought to mind the ramblings of adventurers and movie stars, capturing the last refracted gleanings of a long, distinguished, or occasionally notorious, life.…

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Strange Bedfellows: Science and Religion

By By Jeremy Manier '92

Hours before President George W. Bush spoke from his Texas ranch last August to explain the administration’s new policy on funding for embryonic stem cell research, his aides told reporters that the momentous decision was comparable to sending troops to war.

The metaphor rang true for a controversy that had bitterly alienated the scientific community from religious leaders. Many people of faith – especially Catholics – held that research which destroys human embryos is always unacceptable. Biologists, who claimed no lesser love for human life, stressed that stem cells from embryos could bring treatments for diseases ranging from diabetes to Parkinson’s. Almost nightly, the two camps hashed out their differences in the primal scream debate format of cable news shows.…

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The Eye of the Beholder

By By Chet Raymo '58, '64Ph.D.

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Edward O. Wilson and Wendell Berry are unlikely opponents in the cultural war. Both men have roots in rural America. Both men are motivated by a love of nature. Both men are prolific writers whose work is represented almost side by side in the The Norton Book of Nature Writing

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Oscar Winner Tony Bill Still Flying High

By Eric Butterman

Hollywood hyphenates are common these days: singer-actor J.Lo; writer-director Kevin Smith; director-producer Steven Spielberg; screenwriter-director-actor Woody Allen; and on-and-on-and-on.

When Tony Bill ‘62 broke in as a Hollywood actor in the 1960s, the lines didn’t connect. Directors directed. Producers produced. Actors acted. Maybe starring opposite Frank Sinatra in some of his first few films was an omen—like the Chairman of the Board, Tony Bill did it his way. The 1970s saw him perform the then-rare switch to Oscar-winning producer. In the 1980s, he directed one of the bigger sleeper hits of the decade, My Bodyguard

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Remembering Uncle Father

By Julie Wiskirchen '94

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When my mother had a stroke, I was 9,000 miles away. I was living in Sydney and rushed home to Saint. Louis, after saying a tearful and unexpected goodbye to friends I didn’t plan to leave for another month, when my job transfer was to end. I went back in time by crossing the International Date Line, but couldn’t get back far enough.…

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The essence of Notre Dame

By Tom Pierce '03

It was 1997 and my brother’s first Christmas home after the fall of his freshmen year at Notre Dame. Our family was in church, although it was not our parish but one that we went to sometimes because the priest is an old friend of ours. At the end of Mass we began the slow shuffle out of the church when my brother noticed an older gentleman with a weathered blue coat bearing a tiny N, overlapped by an equally tiny D, too small for the hurried passerby to notice, yet just large enough for a Domer.…

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Two Friends and an MG: A remembrance of William G. Millman Jr., ND Class of 1979

By D.A. Narducci III '80

“Do not bring a car to campus.” Signed by James A. Roemer, Notre Dame dean of students. July 1975.

Bill Millman Jr. and I, classmates at Holy Cross High School in Waterbury, Connecticut, both got accepted to Notre Dame in the spring of 1975. In high school, we had shared real stuff, like heated arguments about unimportant subjects, basketball and girlfriends. Loyalty and competition marked our friendship. After both settling on ND, we dove into planning our maiden voyage to campus. It wasn’t long before Bill proposed driving out in his 1969 MGB

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A Good Place To Come Home To

By Jim Raper

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David Walker ’81 reviews hundreds of appeals from charities each year as vice president for marketing of the National Association of Manufacturers in Washington, D.C. But when a letter from a new charity crossed his desk two years ago, it stirred him like a wake-up call. “We saw its value not as charity so much as duty,” he says.…

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A Group Hug at 50

By Lisa Moore '77

Fifty. It’s an age that used to belong to our parents. Now it belongs to us. For some, it’s a rite of passage we’d rather forget; for others, it’s cause for celebration: We made it! At 50’s cusp, life folds on itself, reflecting on where it’s been and wondering where it’s going. Fifty is full of physical realities: Those faces and figures reflected in the mirrors of Walsh and Farley Halls aren’t quite as perky today. In fact, first thing in the morning, mine can look downright frightening.

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IM therefore I am

By John Monczunski

Instant messaging, the ability to converse online with one or more individuals in real time via email, has been around for about 10 years. According to a Pew Report, 53 million Americans use IM and 24 percent use it more than traditional email. It has become especially popular among college students. A study conducted by students in Associate Professor Susan Blum’s linguistic anthropology class found that 97 percent of Notre Dame students use IM and 63 percent use it five times or more a day. After face-to-face conversation, IM is the most popular communication method among Notre Dame students, ahead of phone conversations, letters and email.…

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A new class of nanostructures

By William Gilroy

Researchers from the University of Notre Dame and Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a new class of materials that may provide a better understanding of how radioactive materials behave in the environment.

“No one has ever seen anything like these,” says Peter Burns, chairman of Notre Dame’s Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences. Called actinyl peroxide compounds, the materials self-assemble into unbelievably small hollow cages that could have useful new electronic, magnetic and structural properties important to the emerging world of nanotechnology.…

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How do you catch the wind?

By John Monczunski

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The sight was eerie, no doubt. In the dead of night last summer in the middle of Utah’s Great Salt Lake Desert, a theatrical fog machine pumped out a steady stream of white smoke while technicians zapped it with green laser light and videotaped the swirls and eddies. What may have looked like special-effects filming for a science-fiction movie was in truth an experiment to determine science fact. Specifically it was to understand high-speed air turbulence, which is of interest to airplane designers, among others.…

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What do you do with the world's most dangerous trash?

By John Monczunski

What Do You Do With the World’s Most Dangerous Trash?

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In the last 50 years the United States has produced approximately 30 million tons of high-level radioactive waste, mostly spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and radioactive debris from weapons production. The material, which will remain hazardous for more than two million years, has been temporarily stored at more than 100 sites across the nation. After 20 years of study, the federal government recommended in 2002 that Yucca Mountain, a remote site in the Nevada desert 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, become the permanent repository for this dangerous waste. While critics question the project’s safety, proponents counter that the alternatives may be even more dangerous. Professor Peter Burns, chairman of Notre Dame’s department of civil engineering and geological sciences, has been involved in the Yucca Mountain Project for eight years. Recently, we talked with him about his work and the safety of Yucca Mountain.…

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Checkback: Cedar Grove response

By Ed Cohen

What was the response by alumni to the offer of body vaults and niches for cremated remains in Cedar Grove Cemetery?

More than 1,500 people have already completed the proposal’s survey form at cominghome.nd.edu. The administrator in charge says many of the comments have revolved around the thought that in many families the children have scattered to different parts of the country and the parents have retired away from their original hometown. The place they reunite, often, is at Notre Dame, so it’s the ideal place for memorials to family members. If demand appears strong enough, organizers expect to present plans to University Trustees at their meeting in October 2005. If approved, sales could begin immediately with the first entombments possible in late 2006.…

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Eucharistic procession revived

By Ed Cohen

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An estimated 250 students and other members of the campus and local communities revived a tradition on the Notre Dame campus with a Eucharistic Procession April 16,2005. Once a yearly event, Eucharistic processions through campus fell out of practice in the years following the Second Vatican Council. The tradition’s revival reflects a renewed interest in classical devotions to the Sacrament of the Eucharist among Notre Dame students. A half-dozen student groups helped organize the event, which also recognized cultural diversity through benedictions and altar decorations reflecting Filipino, European and Latino customs.…

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Popular hymns born in Basilica of the Sacred Heart

By Ed Cohen

It’s not unusual for the director of the Notre Dame Folk Choir, Steven Warner ’80M.A., to walk into the Basilica or somewhere else where a wedding is taking place and hear “Set Your Heart on the Higher Gifts.”

If the bride and groom are knowledgeable Christians, they’re likely to recognize the source of the lyrics, especially the last line of the refrain: “These three gifts are all that remain: faith, hope and love, and the greatest is love.” They’re from Saint Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians.…

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