News » Archives » November 2008

Commencement '08: A beautiful day

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

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Some 2,900 bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral candidates were awarded their Notre Dame degrees on May 18, each with a different story to tell about where their commencement weekend began. For actor Martin Sheen, best known for his role as Notre Dame graduate Josiah Bartlet on NBC’s long-running series, The West Wing

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Notre Dame Class of '08 by the numbers

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

1,980—Seniors in the Class of 2008

1,000+—Pairs of children’s running shoes marathoner Jennifer Korzan will take with her to give to Tanzanian AIDS orphans supported by the charity Hope Runs

438—Master’s degrees awarded by the Mendoza College of Business

358—Master’s and doctoral degree recipients in architecture, engineering, the humanities, sciences and social sciences…

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Echoes: Commencements through history

By Mary Kate Malone '08

For area residents who might want a glimpse of the celebrities and dignitaries gathering on campus in the middle of May, Notre Dame’s commencement has become a tough ticket. As the magazine’s student intern Mary Kate Malone reported back in 2008, it wasn’t always so.

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A readership survey thank you

By The editors

From the staff of Notre Dame Magazine

First, we’d like to say thanks. For 35 years Notre Dame Magazine has been produced with its readers foremost in mind. In return, we’re heartily appreciative of your generous financial support as well as the guidance, story ideas and articles you’ve contributed. It’s been a great relationship. We’re even more sure of that now.…

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Mark Roche: Lessons from the dean's desk

By Conversation conducted by Susan M. Guibert '87, '93MCA

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After 11 years as the I.A. O’Shaughnessy Dean of Arts and Letters, Mark W. Roche stepped down at the end of the academic year, turning over the leadership of Notre Dame’s largest college to historian John McGreevy. Roche, pictured at right talking with a student, met with Susan M. Guibert ‘87, ’93MCA to talk about his tenure as dean, life at home with his wife, Barbara, and what lies ahead. Here’s some of what he had to say:

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Taking the University up another notch

By John Monczunski

Notre Dame has long stated its ambition to become a pre-eminent research university while remaining committed to undergraduate education and its Catholic character. In an unprecedented move this spring, the University dramatically backed up that rhetoric, doling out an initial $40 million in internal funds to foster the kind of high-impact research that could make the rest of academia take notice.…

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The community is our business

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

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Just over a year ago, Christopher Rodriguez had a problem with his car—his father’s 1994 Jeep Grand Cherokee, that is. The CD player was fritzing out, and Rodriguez, then a new driver and a sophomore at South Bend’s Marian High School, was tired of it. So he did what most enterprising teenage boys would do. He bought his dad a “birthday gift,” grabbed some tools and installed it himself.…

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The tiny thoughts on ND's MIND

By John Monczunski

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The electronics industry is in trouble. Unless someone develops a bright idea soon, the long assembly line of progress that has produced ever smaller, faster, cheaper, more powerful computers, cell phones and other electronic devices will likely short circuit and grind to a halt by 2020. Experts predict the limits of current semiconductor technology will be reached that year.…

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Meet me at the Irish Green

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

To visitors, the open field north of Edison Road between Notre Dame Avenue and Eddy Street has been Notre Dame’s rather plain front lawn. To students, it’s just that area over “behind” the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center (DPAC).

The 16-acre site that opened up when Edison was rerouted in 2005 has served few formal purposes since it was planted in feed clover 100 years ago as part of the University farms. Today it has a new name, a new look and a new purpose. As landscapers complete work this summer on the Irish Green, administrators see it as a gathering spot, an idyllic site for University receptions and an important civic link to the larger South Bend community.…

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Innovation Park at Notre Dame

By James Wensits

You might not call it love-hate, but the relationship between Notre Dame and South Bend has always mixed wariness of each other’s faults and a pragmatic recognition of Notre Dame’s role as a major employer and all-around economic engine.

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Here comes the neighborhood

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

“Something there is,” Robert Frost once wrote about the barriers between places and people, “that doesn’t love a wall.” The virtual walls of space and cultural separation that long divided Notre Dame from the surrounding community, erected largely to protect students from South Bend’s allurements and problems, have been crumbling for decades. What remains is about to come down fast.…

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Eddy Street Commons

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

The University of Minnesota has Minneapolis’ Dinkytown. Harvard has all of Cambridge. Even the University of Pennsylvania has a rehabilitated West Philadelphia it can boast about. And Notre Dame has had, well, not a whole heck of a lot.

The South Bend area is full of colleges, and many thousands of people are proud to call it home. But no one has mistaken the city—or any part of it—for a college town. Even as downtown has rallied around a new generation of coffeehouses and eateries, sightings of Notre Dame students outside of a few bars are rare. Neighboring Mishawaka’s Grape Road corridor pulls the bulk of their business.…

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Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

The construction off campus is a natural next step, given the growth of the University itself—and the reasons behind it—over the past 20 years. John Affleck-Graves, Notre Dame's executive vice president, presented the numbers below at a May 7, 2008, town hall meeting with faculty and staff, reminding his audience that the goal is to build Notre Dame's research capacity and attract the most talented scholars while continuing to improve the quality of undergraduate education.

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One Guy's Point of View

By Kerry Temple ’74

I don’t know what it was like to be one of the first women undergrads to enroll at Notre Dame. But I was a junior in 1972-73, so I know it was hard. They were oddities, and they were treated as such—stared at and scrutinized and asked for “the woman’s point of view” in class. They formed a small scouting party of aliens on a primitive, all-male planet. Most of us guys hardly knew how to talk to them—if we’d be so bold as to break ranks and actually venture into conversation with them (a leap into cross-gender social interaction almost always involving beer).…

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Domers in the news (Autumn 2008)

By John Monczunski

Thomas Moe ’75M.A., who was a prisoner of war in Vietnam with John McCain and later commanded Air Force ROTC at Notre Dame, was singled out by vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin during her acceptance speech at the GOP convention. . . . The former dean of Notre Dame Law School, David T. Link ’58, ’61J.D.

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Josh Ozersky, New York's well-seasoned writer

By Eric Butterman

Every day, food editor Josh Ozersky is dealing with an entity that needs to be constantly fed: the New York magazine website. The acclaimed publication, which won five National Magazine Awards last year alone, requires him to take an accurate pulse of the food industry or at least offer helpful insight on where to fashionably dine on a particular Gotham night. Sometimes, surprisingly, Ozersky barely has time to eat.…

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Travel tales

By Robert Schmuhl ’70

Despite the intercontinental incongruity, the tour director’s brogue-sweetened recitation of “Casey at the Bat” made the coach excursion through the West of Ireland all the more memorable. Although the mellifluous guide (Seamus, by name) could liltingly deliver a sizable anthology of Irish verse, he thought U.S. travelers might appreciate a poetic change of pace, a reminder of home.…

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