News » Archives » November 2008

Kids practice safe text

By Robert Ball

Despite a few highly publicized incidents related to e-communications, the majority of American teenagers are neither flooding cyberspace with invitations to predators nor making themselves easy targets for con artists or identity thieves.

Those are the conclusions of the Harris Interactive Youth Query, conducted in December 2006 in collaboration with professors Elizabeth Moore and William Wilkie of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business.…

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Computer game helps ADHD kids

By John Monczunski

The blinking images of a video game offer new hope for children suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , according to a recent study led by Notre Dame psychologist Brad Gibson. The associate professor and his colleagues have confirmed an earlier Swedish study that memory exercises in the form of computer games can mitigate ADHD

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Blueprint for the yellow fever mosquito

By John Monczunski

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Notre Dame entomologist David Severson and his colleagues announced this spring that they have successfully mapped the DNA for Aedes aegypti, the mosquito that spreads yellow fever and dengue fever. The monumental feat took more than 95 scientists from 28 international institutions two-and-a-half years to accomplish.…

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A time-out for celebrating women's sports at Notre Dame

By Marianne Murphy Zarzana ’78

In the beginning, they wore hand-me-down uniforms from men’s teams, jockeyed for court time to practice, called major University athletic departments from their dorm rooms to arrange matches and racking up impressive records for competitiveness—as well as tenacity, creativity and endurance.

Nearly 125 female former Notre Dame student-athletes, coaches and trainers gathered in late April, 2007, for the 35th Anniversary of Women’s Athletics reunion weekend, sponsored by the Athletic Department and the Monogram Club. They were joined by 175 current student-athletes, coaches, student managers and trainers.…

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Down payment on tomorrow's news

By Tim Dougherty ’07

In response to a declining journalism job market, the University’s Gallivan Program in Journalism, Ethics and Democracy is taking a new approach to help Notre Dame students nab coveted summer reporting internships: Buy them.

Last fall the Gallivan program reached agreements with The Philadelphia Inquirer

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Comic book curbs bullies’ bite

By Susan Mullen Guibert ’87, ’93MCA

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Eight-year-old Jalyn knows exactly what it feels like to be picked on—and it really makes her mad. Luckily, she also knows just how to handle it.

“A girl at school makes fun of me and my friend, says stuff about our hair or our skin. And we were really getting mad about it. But after I read the book, I thought a lot about how she makes fun of us and about how we can stand up to her and talk about what she’s doing to us.”…

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Classics revival in the 21st century

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Ovid lurches across the stage, slurps from a bottle and caterwauls the chorus of “Afternoon Delight.” A Siren—that comely mythic monster—blunders through her rendition of another pop song. Apollo is appropriately smarmy in his parody of American Idol host Ryan Seacrest. And Paris, flirting with Helen from his seat on the judges’ panel, is positively on fire.…

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A rigorous record of research

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

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Sometimes the mark of a great idea is that it occurs to more than one person at a time. Such is the case with the Journal of Undergraduate Research, a student-driven, peer-reviewed annual in the College of Arts and Letters. Three years ago Hugh Page, then an associate dean, announced his interest in a publication that would recognize the best undergraduate scholarship in the college and promote interest in graduate study. That afternoon, in walked history major Marianne Magjuka ’05 with a vision for the new journal already worked out.…

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Taking engineers to the zoo

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

A comedian once joked that a Donald Trump-guided tour of New York City would begin, “Own it. Sold it. Built it. Own it. Buying it.” A tour of South Bend’s Potawatomi Zoo with Lloyd Ketchum has a similar feel, minus The Donald’s egocentrism. It’s not that civil engineer Ketchum has become a wildlife tycoon in his retirement from full-time teaching. It’s just that the fingerprints of the students in his Civil Engineering Service Project seminars are everywhere.…

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Hall Portrait: Siegfried

By Tim Dougherty ’07

24th in a series

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Hall Portrait: Siegfried Hall

Year Built: 1988

Capacity: 240 (currently overloaded with 264)

Male or Female: Female until 1997; male since

They Call Themselves: Ramblers, as a nod to the football team’s nickname during the barnstorming days of Knute Rockne. Their Viking image is partially inspired by Siegfried, a Viking warrior in Richard Wagner’s operatic movement “Ride of the Valkyries.” As a women’s dorm, they went by the Slammers.…

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Domer's Index

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Buildings erected on campus since the Class of 2007 entered in fall 2003: 6
Season and tournament goals scored by Irish hockey team en route to first-ever CCHA championship: 139
Shutouts suffered by team: 1
Teams in the ’07 Bookstore Basketball Tournament: 655
Seniors on Irish women’s track and field team, which won its first-ever Big East outdoor championship: 9

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Deaths in the family

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

REX J. RAKOW ’82M.S., whose 22 years of service as the director of the Notre Dame Security Police were marked by the same humility and grace with which he fought his 18-month battle with cancer, died in March at his home in Granger, Indiana, surrounded by friends and family. He was 55.

Rakow, a Mishawaka, Indiana, native, served under three presidents of the University, having joined the campus security staff as assistant director in 1979. He coordinated security details for the visits of nine U.S. presidents and 11 foreign heads of state, building a wealth of experience that he shared generously with colleagues as a leader of local and international professional organizations, as an instructor and as a friend. Phillip Johnson ’81, ’99MBA, Rakow’s successor at NDSP

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Books in brief

By Sarah Miller

The Eighth American Saint, Katherine Burton (Acta Publications). Originally published in 1959 under the title Faith Is the Substance, the biography describes the work of recently canonized Mother Theodore Guerin, who founded the Sisters of Providence of Saint Mary-of-the-Woods, Indiana.

Ask the Bible Geek 2: More Answers to Questions from Catholic Teens

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Domers in the News

By John Monczunski

Tim Boyle ’77 recently made his Hollywood acting debut in the upcoming film The Final Season, a Hoosiers/Rudy-style movie starring Sean Astin about an Iowa high school baseball team. Boyle, president of the Cedar Rapids Convention and Visitors Bureau, had a few lines playing the father of the Astin character’s romantic interest in the film, which is set for an early fall release. Unfortunately, dashing any “best supporting actor” nominations he may have had, Boyle recently learned his scenes have been cut to shorten the movie’s running time. If you watch closely, you may still see him in the background of one scene. . . . Stephen J. Brogan ’77J.D., Jay Flaherty ’79 and John W. Glynn Jr. ’62

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Notre Dame architects in high demand

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

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Graduates from the School of Architecture had to work awfully hard this year not to get a job. Eighteen firms purchased a $20 CD-ROM collective portfolio the school produced to feature students’ work. Another 65 firms showed up at the 2007 career fair in March. All to woo a pool of 52 undergraduates and master’s candidates.…

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Commencement: A class in ruins

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Lives ruined and complicated: such are the fruits of four years at Notre Dame, according to Class of 2007 valedictorian Michael Rossmann.

“You probably didn’t save for years and take out loans with the explicit intention of being ‘ruined,’ but Notre Dame has changed us, has ruined the ‘us’ that came here in the fall of 2003,” the theology and economics major told parents and students at the University’s 162nd Commencement Exercises on May 20. “We cannot see things the same way, and our lives are more complicated because of engaging the world with the resources of faith and reason.”…

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Seen and heard on the Notre Dame campus

By Notre Dame Magazine

Compiled by John Monczunski

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Sacred Heart Basilica underwent an unscheduled renovation on May 15, 2007, when high winds from a severe thunderstorm knocked one of four small spires from the church’s bell tower to the ground in a shower of bricks and mortar. The following week the three remaining spires were removed from the steeple as a precaution. The spires will be replaced at some future date after structural engineers have redesigned them to prevent a recurrence of the accident. The storm, which severely damaged 30 trees across campus, especially around the Grotto and “Domehenge,” also caused the top of a four-story pine tree to crash into the church, damaging two stained glass windows. . . . Notre Dame head football coach

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Growing up, pushing out: As it turns 25, the Center for Social Concerns pioneers new horizons

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

It’s hard to think of an institution closer to the core of Notre Dame’s collective consciousness than the Center for Social Concerns, unless it involves a gridiron and a pigskin or has a last name like Hesburgh. Considering that Father Hesburgh, CSC, has had more than seven decades to make an impression at Notre Dame and the football program even longer, that says a lot.…

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Stop It

By Sarah Morgan

Our lawyer is here today, and we’ve been going over the points of our countersuit against the neighbors. It’s hard to understand everything she says because it’s all in Spanish, but I get most of it. Once in awhile there is a word—in this case, intransigente—I don’t. I try to memorize it as she zips along as though I were a native speaker.…

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The Power at My Fingertips

By Liquid error: internal

I remember the day I first saw my father’s pistol. I remember the gun in my father’s hand, the click-snick sound as he cycled a round into its chamber. I remember the pistol as small, square and dark.

I am 4 years old. World War II is over. My father has left the military to work in the California oil fields. We live at the edge of an orange grove, and my mother keeps chickens and a garden. Dogs are attacking the chickens. My father rages from the bedroom with the weapon in his hand.…

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My Turn to Sing Along

By Jay Mootz ’83

Music that spoke to me as a teenager was not kind to my elders. “I hope I die before I get old,” screamed The Who. Later, Neil Young offered a softer metaphor: “It’s better to burn out than it is to rust.” I now find myself on the other side of that divide, and my 14-year-old son, Daniel, serves as a daily reminder of my fall.…

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Looking Deep Into the Ocean

By Ronald Blubaugh ’60

I used to wonder how people learned they had been diagnosed with cancer. Was it the first thing the doctor said after closing the door? Could they tell from the doctor’s facial expression? Once told, how did the patient react: Stunned silence? Tears? Nausea? When I found out, I was sitting at my desk at work, talking on the telephone. My urologist had told me to call him at 1 p.m., three days after a biopsy was taken of my prostate. When he came on the line, he said simply, “I’m afraid they did find some cancer.”…

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It's Not Always a Death Sentence

By John Monczunski

Ever since I was a kid my plan has been to live forever, and—as the saying goes—so far my plan is working. Maybe that’s your plan, too. The problem is we both know there’s a flaw. Lately, with way too much regularity, I have begun to see dear friends, relatives and acquaintances my age and younger facing serious, life-threatening health problems.…

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Doing Further Damage

By Lynn Cassella-Kapusinski ’85

According to researchers, one of the best predictors of children’s psychological functioning after divorce is the psychological adjustment of the residential parent and the quality of parenting provided by that parent. Many separated or divorced parents, however, often feel powerless when it comes to parenting effectively. They may be stunned by their own grief or overwhelmed by the difficulty of raising children or raising them without the cooperation of the other parent.…

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Breach of Faith

By Lynn Cassella-Kapusinski ’85

My brother Marc and I sit close together at the top of the stairs while our parents yell at one another downstairs. At age 15, Marc has become my protector, my rock of Gibraltar. Yet, on this evening, I cannot find comfort.

Cupboards slam shut. Dishes and pans clank in the sink. The yelling intensifies. We continue to sit there with the lights off, staring down toward the foot of the stairs. I also want to yell, want to say: Stop it already! This is wrong! Don’t you see what you’re putting us through? But I am 11 years old and petrified to do anything. I hug my arms in front of me and hold myself tight. I have been hearing my parents fight incessantly for years, but I still can’t get used to it.…

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Why So Mad?

By Andrew Santella

You are better than this.

You are not a hostile person, not a picker of fights. You’re a Boy Scout troop leader, Friend of the Library, volunteer at the PTA. Last year, you even called in and donated money during one of those NPR fund drives.

And yet you have these moments when the worst parts of your nature come to the fore. Moments when the world seems to be conspiring against you and the frustration builds inside you and the frustration turns to rage.…

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Come Holy Spirit

By Kerry Temple ’74

Life at Notre Dame is an invocation. It is a prayer, a petition, a benediction. It is a blessing of grace and community, lives devoted to a higher calling, a sense of the divine threading through the strands of human endeavor here. Notre Dame is a place where God is spoken—and not just as some enigmatic concept but as a real and living force, a participant in daily affairs. Notre Dame can be a sacrament of holy initiative, of sacred creativity, blessed learning and ancient wisdom. It has soul. The spirit is palpable. The expressions of faith are abundant and diverse, commonplace and rare.…

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