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Alumni briefs

By Notre Dame Alumni Association

New Alumni Board Members

On July 1, the following alumni began three-year terms on the Alumni Board of Directors: Young Alumni—Rob Holcomb ’99, Sunnyvale, California; Region 3—Holly Colman ’86, Ventura, California; Region 4—Patrick Reis ’85, Minneapolis; Region 7—Patrick McKeever ’61, Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan; Region 10—Patrick Perrella ’90, New York, New York; Region 14—Paul Christmann Jr. ’89, New Orleans; Region 18—Steve Hogan ’86J.D., Saratoga Springs, New York; International (Europe)—Pai Gee-Janssens ’97; Black Alumni of ND—James W. Riley Jr. ’94.…

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The little penmaker who does

By Robert Schmuhl ’70

Back in high school during the 1980s, Mike Hochstetler developed a large, painful callus on his writing hand. After enrolling at Notre Dame and enduring more discomfort, he figured out how to cure the problem. Today the remedy has become his life.

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Domers in the news

By John Monczunsk

Kenneth Stinson ’64, chairman of Peter Kiewit Sons’ Inc., one of the nation’s largest construction firms, was elected in May to Notre Dame’s Board of Trustees. He has been a member of the College of Engineering’s advisory council since 1996. . . . Ann Claire Williams ’75J.D., a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals, was the commencement speaker at Saint Mary’s College this year. A former elementary school teacher before beginning her legal career, Williams was appointed by President Reagan in 1985 to the bench of the U.S. District Court, Northern District of Illinois. In 1999 she was named a judge for the 7th Circuit of the appeals court by President Clinton. . . . Joseph A. Cari Jr. ’74 ’78J.D.

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My Story, Page 1

By Readers

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What a feeling

By Lou E. LaGrand ’58
Venice, Florida

It has been 48 years since I spent my one calendar year at Notre Dame, and yet it never fails, every time I hear or see the words “Notre Dame” my mind goes positive. I have been given a most welcome treat. Why? I suspect there is a mysterious reason, part of my life script. Perhaps to help keep my inner life vibrant and other-centered. However, what is very clear is that the intangible atmosphere that permeates the Notre Dame experience has penetrated to the deepest core of my being. The physical and spiritual presence of the campus coupled with the people who roam this happy place remind me of the peace and goodwill that every heart seeks.…

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My Story, Page 3

By Readers

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Fighting Irish Legends

by Bob Plain ’69
Greensboro, North Carolina

Written in January 1994 for my father, George Plain ’39

The game and the athlete have played a prominent role in my life. I have logged untold hours and miles in support of Little League, CYO

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My Story, Page 4

By Readers

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A Coat’s Life

by Joseph B. Joyce, ’54
Des Moines, Iowa

In the fall of my junior year of high school I found that I needed a new overcoat for the coming winter. Being a frugal lad, I took my business to the plain, pipe racks of Robert Hall. There a dandy, blue job of a mysterious, fuzzy material drew my admiring glances, and that coat left the low-rent district under my arm.…

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My Story, Page 5

By Readers

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My Father’s Room

By Kathy (McCarthy) Walsh ’86

When I was dropped off at Notre Dame in August 1982, my mom commented more than once that my new address sounded very familiar. I had come to ND as a late admission; much of my paperwork awaited me when I arrived. I did not learn my final dorm assignment until I arrived for freshman orientation. When my mother and one of my sisters, who had come along for the ride, returned home, they confirmed with my dad that my freshman room in Breen-Phillips was the exact same room my father, John Joseph McCarthy ’58, had occupied a few decades earlier. Since my high school sweetheart-parents corresponded between ND and Trinity College during their college years, the room number, 223, instantly rang a bell in my mother’s ear.…

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The painter with the golden touch

By Suzanne Smith Arney

It was an opening at a New York City gallery in 1978. Ernest Garthwaite ’62 M.A. was exhibiting a series of paintings under the title Cree Skins. Unannounced, a native Cree in full tribal dress entered the room and began to dance. Chanting and swirling, his presence astonished the crowd, no one more so than Garthwaite himself. “I was completely surprised,” says Garthwaite, “and felt deeply honored by his ceremonial tribute.” The stranger left as mysteriously as he had arrived.

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Don't fight, compromise

By John Monczunski

Parents who often fight with one another or ignore their spouse in front of their children may do well to resolve their differences constructively, according to two recent studies. Researchers at the University of Rochester and Catholic University have confirmed earlier findings by Notre Dame psychology Professor E. Mark Cummings that parental conflict can have a lasting negative impact on a child’s development.…

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You've got mail . . . just like Darwin and Einstein

By John Monczunski

Little did you know that you have a lot in common with Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein. At least when it comes to managing your email.

Notre Dame Professor of Physics Albert László Barabási and his colleague João Gama Oliveira recently found that the correspondence of the famed scientists followed the same mathematical formula Barabási earlier identified describing the pattern for email correspondence.…

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Jim Ryan '06

By Jim Ryan '06

As commencement approached for the class of 2006, Notre Dame Magazine asked our student, intern, Jim Ryan of Dallas, to select a few classmates to represent this year‘s senior class and talk to them about their time at Notre Dame. Here‘s five he picked and some of their thoughts.

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Don't be a bad sport

By John Monczunski

Ideally, youth sports programs like Little League and Pop Warner football build character by instilling positive values associated with fair play, goal-oriented teamwork, respect, camaraderie and the like. And most often that is the effect they have. But unfortunately sometimes negative lessons rooted in a win-at-all-costs ethic may be taught as well.…

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The power of magnetic chips

By John Monczunski

A revolutionary computer chip made of ultra-small magnets that holds the promise of almost unimaginable speed and power came a step closer to reality thanks to a recent Notre Dame breakthrough.

Notre Dame electrical engineering researchers Alexandra Imre, Lili Ji, Gary Bernstein and Wolfgang Porod, along with Gyorgy Csaba of the Technical University of Munich, demonstrated that submicroscopic magnets, billionths of a meter in size, can perform the function of transistors in a logic circuit, the basis of all computing functions.…

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A really cool planet

By John Monczunski

In our galaxy far, far away—20,000 light years, near the center of the Milky Way in the constellation Sagittarius, to be exact—an international team of astronomers that includes Notre Dame’s David Bennett recently discovered a planet that resembles Earth, albeit remotely.

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A protest over paychecks

By Jim Ryan ’06

A group of Notre Dame students held a sit-in outside the office of University President Father John I. Jenkins, CSC, in May 2006 as it continued its call for the University to increase significantly the wages of its lowest-paid workers. The Campus Labor Action Project (CLAP), founded in September 2005, seeks to “build an authentic Notre Dame family that treats students, workers, faculty, and alumni as equal members,” according to the CLAP

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Hall portrait: Flanner

By Jim Ryan ’06

20th in a series

Hall Portrait: Flanner

Year Built: 1969

Capacity: Up to 530

Male or Female: Always male until fall 1997

They Called Themselves: The Gamecocks or the Cocks

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Deaths in the Notre Dame family

By Notre Dame Alumni Association

Rev. William Botzum, CSC, who taught in the Department of Psychology for 30 years and served as a residence hall rector, died March 2, 2006, in Holy Cross House at Notre Dame. He was 89 and had been a priest for nearly 63 years.

Father Botzum was a quiet man said to be deeply dedicated to his life as a priest and teacher, with a dry wit and eyes that lit up during a conversation. His academic interest lay in statistical inference, which served him well in his lifelong hobby—playing bridge. He was well-known in local bridge circles, frequently playing in tournaments. He could often be seen walking across campus with his nose in a small book detailing the winning combinations in the card game. In 1958 he was given the “Life Master—Life Member” award by the American Contract Bridge League.…

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Letters to the editor

By Readers

Editor’s note: The letters that appeared in the summer 2006 print issue are marked with a double asterisk (**)

Those Monologues

** One of the most challenging issues facing Notre Dame is the issue of academic freedom and Catholic values. On one hand there is the argument that Notre Dame’s teaching should be in accord with clearly stated Church positions. On the other is the belief that truth is best reached with an academic freedom that will, at times, diverge from the Church’s magisterium.…

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Irish quarterbacks star in DVD and website

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

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Notice: Several readers have been unable to order the DVD because the website and the toll-free ordering number both were out of order. As of early August, the toll-free 800 number and the website are working.

Inside the Irish Huddle: Stories from the Legendary Notre Dame Quarterbacks

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Culture, Irish-style

By None

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The Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies at Notre Dame is now collaborating on the publication of Field Day Review. This annual journal, primarily concerned with Irish literary and political culture, has been published for 25 years. It is edited by Seamus Deane and Breandan Mac Suibhne, both of the Irish studies institute. The 2005 issue is pictured at left.…

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Books by Notre Dame people

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Whiteman, Tony D’souza ’00MFA (Harcourt). This widely hailed debut novel follows the questing Jack Diaz, who leaves Chicago to serve as a relief worker on the West African coast. As funding evaporates and civil war looms, Jack seeks an intimate understanding of the culture and his place within it before he must scramble to evacuate. An editor’s choice novel of The New York Times Book Review

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Seen and heard on campus

By Notre Dame Magazine

Emil T. Hofman, the legendary chemistry professor emeritus and former dean of First Year of Studies, has made two trips this past year to Notre Dame’s Holy Cross Hospital in Leogane, Haiti. The clinic, which combats HIV/AIDS and labors to eradicate lymphatic filariasis (also known as elephantiasis), is operated in conjunction with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and is supported in part by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The 85-year-old Hofman, who estimates that he taught 32,000 students over his 40-year teaching career, is now looking for some of those alumni, particularly physicians, to make a four-day reconnaissance visit to the clinic, headed by Rev. Thomas G. Streit, CSC

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A commitment to the neighborhood

By Kerry Temple ’74

A little more than five years ago a single-story, red-brick building that had housed a grocery and a Goodwill store at the “Five Corners” intersection just south of campus was purchased by the University. There were plenty of suitors for the ample space, but the University decided to use the facility to make a commitment to the Northeast Neighborhood, to establish a community center, educational programs and Notre Dame presence in the residential area whose health and well-being are so interwoven with the school’s.

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The one who walked away

By Gwen O'Brien

Jay Caponigro ’91 paces the sidewalk in the dark at the corner of a normally busy South Bend intersection. Back and forth. Back and forth.

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Mermaid at the ocean’s door

By Mark Clevenger

My 4-year-old daughter Chloe likes to take her toy tambourine into the front yard to put on “shows,” setting a hat on the sidewalk so passersby can give her money. Along with her imaginative play, I also find her language beautiful. She begins nearly every sentence with “Know what?” or “Even,” as in “Even I ate oatmeal this morning” or “Know what? Even Mommy said I could have a hermit crab.”

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Keeper of the water

By Margaret A. Frey

I never wanted a swimming pool, not once, though I’ve long admired the playful designs—round and octagon, kidney- and heart-shaped. Or my all-time favorites: Liberace’s quirky piano pool and Nashville’s mosaic-tiled guitar. Still, digging a hole in the ground and filling it with water always struck me as silly and pointless. I grew up along the creeks, rivers and lakes of South Jersey. My sister and I skimmed stones and canoed the Delaware, entered inner-tube races on Olympia Lake and spent heady weekends surfing the Atlantic off Brigantine Island. Private pools were rare in the 1950s and ’60s, a luxury only the rich could afford.…

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Bottles cast upon the sea

By Andrew H. Malcolm

The walls of my Ohio childhood carried many pictures. They had World War II aircraft, Captain Marvel drawings, the Lone Ranger’s color photo (autographed). These images changed over time according to the tides of juvenile interests. But one constant through all those years was a map of the world.

My father would point out various lands, which were farther away than even Pennsylvania. And on that map we would trace in crayon where I had traveled. Up until one gray day in June over a half-century ago those colored lines were confined to the North American mainland. But then we boarded an ocean ferry for a vacation venture to the island of Nantucket out in the Atlantic Ocean.…

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