News » Archives » July 2010

Deep Sea Divers

By Tim Dougherty '07

Maybe no man is an island. But pack 135 of them together inside 6,000 tons of airtight steel suspended hundreds of feet beneath the surface of the ocean, and collectively that’s what they become.

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Domers inthe news

By John Monczunski

Astronaut Michael T. Good ’84, ’86M.S. was a crew member on the Space Shuttle Atlantis’ final mission in May. Good served as flight engineer and performed two spacewalks during the 12-day mission, which attached a Russian-made module to the International Space Staton. A year ago, the Ohio native flew on a shuttle mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. . . . Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice ’75M.A.

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Saving the medicine of last resort

By John Monczunski

Unless you’ve been at death’s door with a compromised immune system or happen to be a medicinal chemist, chances are you’ve never heard of a “carbapenem” antibiotic. But should you have the misfortune to become gravely ill with an infection and no other medicine works, you’ll be glad to come in contact with one.

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Communities opposed to gay marriage

By John Monczunski

Opposition to same-sex marriage appears to be especially strong in communities in which traditional gender roles and family structure are dominant and, at the same time, a high level of population mobility, low homeownership rates and high crime rates are prevalent.

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Handling 10 million years of danger

By John Monczunski

A recent study by Notre Dame scientists might mean rethinking how radioactive waste is stored and handled. Common scientific wisdom has said that all radioactive elements behave in a similar fashion when it comes to their physical and chemical properties.

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Not yet finished

By Sarah Hellman ’97

As I glide through the last turn in this 25-kilometer race, I can’t help but wonder what got me to this point. I have been swimming for more than seven hours and am mentally and physically exhausted.

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ADHD misdiagnosed?

By John Monczunski

Within the past 25 years the United States has suffered an unprecedented epidemic of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among the nation’s children. From the late 1980s to the early 2000s the rate of diagnosis soared 500 percent. What is driving this surge?

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The Spoken World

By Elizabeth Dodd

My brother’s first word was “duck.” It was a marvelous word for a baby to master — so satisfying in its powerful consonants, its one-syllable explosive force.

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As it was in the beginning

By William E. Carroll '65

Outmoded and pointless: That’s the philosophical judgment of many who think a belief in God as Creator is an artifact from a less enlightened age.

The commemorations last year of the birth of Charles Darwin (1809) and of the publication of On the Origin of Species (1859) offered us a stark reminder that scientific advances in evolutionary biology and cosmology have long served as the basis for that increasingly pervasive philosophical outlook, which dismisses divine agency.…

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Destination Everest

By John Collins Rudolf

“Gravity never sleeps!” It’s a bright morning in mid-April, high in the Himalayas, when Vern Tejas barks out this Zen-like epigram to the group of would-be Everest summiteers arrayed before him.

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Forward Motion

By Elizabeth Redden

For decades doctors thought nothing could be done about Down syndrome. The latest research promises otherwise, and the Flatley family is working toward that day when research changes lives.

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Good Luck Lake

By Mark Phillips

It swept me like an October windstorm, my sap plummeting and years rattling and ripping loose. Although I was wearing shorts and standing amidst a seesawing cloud of honeybees, I almost expected to glimpse snowflakes.

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Mutually beneficial

By James Wensits

The Potawatomi Park greenhouses east of downtown South Bend house a perfect example of the burgeoning partnership between Notre Dame and the city of South Bend.

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Seven Summits

By John Collins Rudolf

The seven summits are the highest peaks on each continent, and the successful ascent of all seven is considered a unique mountaineering challenge.

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Father Malloy paves the way

By James Wensits

Rev. Edward A. “Monk” Malloy, who grew up in Washington, D.C., brought an urban perspective with him to Notre Dame and an appreciation for how important the health of a city is to those people and institutions that inhabit it.

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From Mountaintop to Global Health

By John Collins Rudolf

My father’s quest to scale the seven summits — the highest peak on each continent — began in February 2007 with an ascent of Aconcagua, a 22,000 foot Andean peak that straddles the borders of Chile and Argentina. The climb apparently gave John Curtis Rudolf ’70 the incurable case of summit fever that led him to the slopes of Mount Everest three years later.

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Here and there

By Kerry Temple ’74

Dark storm clouds stretch across the distant horizon to the north. I can see them out my fifth-floor window in Grace Hall. They look like distant mountains. I wish they were.

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New Horizons

By James Wensits

Notre Dame and South Bend have been braided by geography, history and a relationship that has at times been distant and knotty. But real change is coming as these neighbors see how badly they need each other.

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