News » Archives » 2010

Haiti panoramic

By Matt Cashore '94

Attend Mass in the rubble of Ste. Rose de Lima church in Leogane, Haiti, March 2010. This panoramic image provides a 360-degree view and there is audio, so be sure to turn volume up or down as appropriate.

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The Playroom: Don't push

By Maraya Steadman '89, '90MBA

I make a lot of parenting mistakes. Some are minor, like forgetting we need ketchup or, in a moment of desperation at the ice rink, putting Diet Coke in Emma’s sippy cup. Now she loves the stuff. This week I made a major mistake.

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My leap into tomorrow

By Lawrence S. Cunningham

Life has a certain way of sneaking up on you. It dawned on me one day that Lou Holtz was four coaches ago; many of my colleagues do not remember where they were when Kennedy was shot because they were not yet anywhere.

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In Italy’s ruined Abruzzo, architects envision a traditional future

By Liquid error: internal

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The earthquakes that recently rumbled Haiti, Chile and China also dominated the media with Richter-scale force. For a few days, it’s nonstop coverage as survivors are dragged from the rubble and families share their grief with the world. But as action shifts from the disaster itself to the arduous work of making life normal again — providing food, medicine, shelter and hope for those who have lost so much — the TV crews leave.…

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The great outdoors graduation

By John Monczunski

Notre Dame’s 165th commencement went back to the future on May 16. For the first time since 1959, the University’s graduation exercises were held outdoors in Notre Dame Stadium.

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Professors probe the power of the blog

By Susan Guibert ’87, ’93MCA

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If you’re a regular visitor to the land of blogs, then you’re familiar with its vast and varied citizenry: mad moms and money managers, political activists and poodle aficionados, all finding an audience and a niche online. Not surprising, then, that some Notre Dame faculty members regularly chime in and offer their own specialized expertise in the blogosphere.…

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The mother lode

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

At this point in her life’s journey, Maraya Steadman ’89, ’90MBA is a stay-at-home mother of three. Her Notre Dame diplomas hang in the laundry room as she struggles with trying to fold fitted sheets.

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Deep Sea Divers

By Tim Dougherty '07

Maybe no man is an island. But pack 135 of them together inside 6,000 tons of airtight steel suspended hundreds of feet beneath the surface of the ocean, and collectively that’s what they become.

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Domers inthe news

By John Monczunski

Astronaut Michael T. Good ’84, ’86M.S. was a crew member on the Space Shuttle Atlantis’ final mission in May. Good served as flight engineer and performed two spacewalks during the 12-day mission, which attached a Russian-made module to the International Space Staton. A year ago, the Ohio native flew on a shuttle mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. . . . Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice ’75M.A.

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Saving the medicine of last resort

By John Monczunski

Unless you’ve been at death’s door with a compromised immune system or happen to be a medicinal chemist, chances are you’ve never heard of a “carbapenem” antibiotic. But should you have the misfortune to become gravely ill with an infection and no other medicine works, you’ll be glad to come in contact with one.

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Communities opposed to gay marriage

By John Monczunski

Opposition to same-sex marriage appears to be especially strong in communities in which traditional gender roles and family structure are dominant and, at the same time, a high level of population mobility, low homeownership rates and high crime rates are prevalent.

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Handling 10 million years of danger

By John Monczunski

A recent study by Notre Dame scientists might mean rethinking how radioactive waste is stored and handled. Common scientific wisdom has said that all radioactive elements behave in a similar fashion when it comes to their physical and chemical properties.

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Not yet finished

By Sarah Hellman ’97

As I glide through the last turn in this 25-kilometer race, I can’t help but wonder what got me to this point. I have been swimming for more than seven hours and am mentally and physically exhausted.

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ADHD misdiagnosed?

By John Monczunski

Within the past 25 years the United States has suffered an unprecedented epidemic of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among the nation’s children. From the late 1980s to the early 2000s the rate of diagnosis soared 500 percent. What is driving this surge?

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The Spoken World

By Elizabeth Dodd

My brother’s first word was “duck.” It was a marvelous word for a baby to master — so satisfying in its powerful consonants, its one-syllable explosive force.

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As it was in the beginning

By William E. Carroll '65

Outmoded and pointless: That’s the philosophical judgment of many who think a belief in God as Creator is an artifact from a less enlightened age.

The commemorations last year of the birth of Charles Darwin (1809) and of the publication of On the Origin of Species (1859) offered us a stark reminder that scientific advances in evolutionary biology and cosmology have long served as the basis for that increasingly pervasive philosophical outlook, which dismisses divine agency.…

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