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Ideal for complex calculations or as a between-meals snack

By Ed Cohen

When Peter Kogge, a 1968 Notre Dame graduate, makes presentations to his fellow computer scientists about the work he’s doing, helping develop a memory chip unimaginably smarter than anything in existence, he has a surprise waiting for the audience at the end: The miracle chip is already in production.…

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Some Memory Improves with Age

By John Monczunski

The humorist Fred Allen once said, “I always have trouble remembering three things: faces, names and . . . I can’t remember what the third thing is.” The older we get, the more most of us relate to that statement. But, contrary to popular wisdom, memory – at least a certain type – actually may improve with age, says Notre Dame’s Gabriel Radvansky.…

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Appleby: Gay Priests No Surprise

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

R. Scott Appleby, director of Notre Dame’s Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, said a newspaper report indicating there are significant numbers of gay priests “will come as little or no surprise to most Catholic parishioners,” and it doesn’t necessarily cause Catholics great concern to know or suspect their priest has a homosexual orientation.…

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Father Newton off to Africa

By Ed Cohen

If Father Steve Newton, CSC, were a character in a movie instead of the real-life rector of Sorin Hall, the announcement he made at the annual hall banquet last November would have had predictable results.

Newton, a 1970 Notre Dame graduate, chose the occasion to inform residents that this, his 11th year in charge of the campus’s oldest dorm, would be his last. He was moving to East Africa next summer, he told them, to help the Congregation of Holy Cross develop desperately needed education and treatment programs for alcoholism and other addictions in Kenya and Uganda.…

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New AD from Arizona

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

As the search committee’s members listened to advice about who would make the ideal athletic director for Notre Dame, President Edward Malloy said, “one name kept coming up.”

In March 2000 Malloy spoke that name at a press conference in the Main Building when he introduced Arizona State athletic director Kevin White as the 11th athletic director of Notre Dame and the first who will report directly to the president.…

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Film Festival Now on Video

By Jaclyn Villano

Fans of Notre Dame’s annual Student Film Festival can now relive those cherished and sometimes bizarre memories at home.

Recently released on video, The Loft Tapes is a 110-minute compilation of the best student-made films created in undergraduate film courses at Notre Dame between 1993 and 1997. Two-person student teams wrote and directed each film in approximately eight weeks for about $900.…

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Working Out at Notre Dame

By Andrew McDonnell

Sisyphus and the Universal Hamster Wheel

The concept of the Notre Dame student as the embodiment of the Whole Person is one that the University has long prided itself in. It is expected that by the time students finish their education they will have been educated in mind, spirit and body — the trinity of human composition, separate yet inseparable, salty but with a hint of mango.…

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Seen and Heard

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan will be the principal speaker at commencement in May. . . . Here’s a sign of progress for those who think Notre Dame’s faculty is too heavily weighted with white males: Women or members of a racial or ethnic minority accounted for 32 of the 63 teaching-and-research faculty hires during the 1998-99 academic year, according to the annual report of the University’s Academic Affirmative Action Committee. But the committee said “the overall number of faculty of color remains unacceptably low” and there’s a “virtual absence” of African Americans. . . . A few years ago in-line skates were all the rage on campus and bicycles passé, but bikes are back. It’s not uncommon to see 200 to 300 parked outside a residence hall, compared with fewer than a hundred two or three years ago. p(image-right). bike The bike boom is borne out in the number of bikes registered with campus police — 259 in 1997, compared with 391 this past fall, although hundreds more bikes never get registered because it isn’t required. The renewed popularity of bikes is probably a consequence of the campus spreading out. With four new residence halls built on the back nine of the golf course and the bookstore relocating from the South Quad to south of the Morris Inn, students face longer commutes. Grounds crews are adding bike racks but can’t keep up with growth in demand at popular locations like the north door of DeBartolo. Which is why you see bikes chained to light and sign poles, railings, even trees. . . . Nine out of 10 Notre Dame freshmen surveyed say they plan to earn an advanced degree. . . . Five years ago, when he was 14 and recovering from surgery for a rare form of bone cancer, Joe Collins of Placentia, California, was contacted by the Make-A-Wish Foundation, a group that arranges for children facing life-threatening illness to enjoy special adventures. He wished for a trip to Notre Dame to see a football game, and he got it; the Irish beat Air Force. But since then he’s had better news. The cancer is gone. “I am completely better. There’s nothing wrong with me,” Collins tells fellow residents of Zahm Hall; he’s now a Notre Dame sophomore. He hasn’t forgotten his introduction to campus. Last fall he and some buddies helped out with a fund-raiser for Make-A-Wish at a South Bend radio station. He says he plans to get more involved with the organization in the future. . . . In January and February the Snite Museum hosted a traveling exhibit of 100 photographic portraits. The pictures were taken by the authorities at a high school in Cambodia that in the 1970s was converted by the Khmer Rouge into a prison and a way station to an execution site. Of 14,200 people brought to the prison, seven survived. The exhibit held special meaning for Wuy Nem, who works in the North Dining Hall, and his wife, Sal. As reported in The Observer,

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Letter from Campus: Are You Eating All Right, Dear?

By Ed Cohen

As Tam crossed in front of me, I glanced down at what was on her tray: a slice of pizza.

Where’d she get that? I wondered but was too embarrassed to ask. Besides, she wasn’t breaking stride heading back to our table.

It was about 1 o’clock in the afternoon and we were in the North Dining Hall, not my usual place to have lunch. My usual place is at my desk in Grace Hall, eating a spinach salad and trying not to spatter fat-free French dressing on the galleys I’m supposed to be proofreading.…

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Far afield: The appreciation of Mike Brey

By Jason Kelly '95

Among college basketball’s lifer-legends like Mike Krzyzewski, Jim Boeheim and Jim Calhoun; among the earnest stewards of regal programs like Roy Williams, Bill Self and Ben Howland; among the slippery, the nomadic and the pugnacious, like John Calipari, Rick Pitino, and Tom Izzo, Notre Dame coach Mike Brey cuts a modest profile.

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The Playroom: Valentine’s Day

By Maraya Steadman '89, '90MBA

I am a mother of young children, and I think Valentine’s Day can be annoying. One of the biggest annoyances is the peanut-free school Valentine’s Day party, which necessitates 78 valentines I have to come up with for my kids to distribute at school so other mothers can throw them away.

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ND Free Pass: Women’s basketball

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Yes, I was among the 1,000 or so hardy — or maybe foolhardy — fans who to attended the Feb. 1 ND vs. Syracuse women’s basketball game. The blizzard of 2011 was gearing up, and the icy wind and stinging snow pellets made even a short walk to the Joyce Center’s Purcell Pavilion a winter’s agony.

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ND Free Pass: Fencing

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Irish fencers always duel their way to the top of the NCAA rankings. You will see a live-action game of strategic finesse, what has been called “physical chess,” as competitors chase and withdraw, lunge and run, stab and feint, and display intricate footwork and calculated swordplay.

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Networthy ND 10

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

With the current unrest in Egypt, Notre Dame Professor Emad Shahin has been called on for his insights countless times in recent days. Here are links to a sampling of his commentary in audio, video and print.

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Soundings: And the winner is . . .

By Kerry Temple ’74

I wasn’t disappointed that none of my three kindergartners got an award during their elementary school’s assembly. But awards: an interesting topic, especially now with a national debate ignited by a Chinese Tiger Mom scolding America for its leniently errant parenting style.

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Hard Hats

By Sharen Walsh '78

It was at a scheduling meeting when someone called upstairs to the new secretary for a copy of a letter. One of the senior managers looked around the table and said with a smirk, “S—-t, Diane’s so fat she won’t get that letter down the stairs ’til next week.” Then he watched me for my reaction.

He made this comment partly because he was just one of those people who enjoyed belittling others, and partly (profanity included) to get a rise out of me. I was

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Much Ado about Shakespeare

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

It can be tough to grab a spot in a popular class. When Paul Rathburn and Katherine Pogue teach “Shakespeare in Performance” this summer, students soon will discover that it’s going to require skill and talent both to get in the class and to survive the course requirements. The end result, however, will be far more than intellectual growth and a grade.…

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Chip Master: Gary H. Bernstein

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

In a laboratory buried deep inside Fitzpatrick Hall of Engineering, Notre Dame students are fabricating sophisticated computer chips. Not advanced graduate students, but undergraduates. And what they’re fabricating are not just simple logic gates, but a complex microprocessor with as many as 3,000 transistors.…

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Idea Changer : Scott Maxwell

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

For those students who think statistics promises a dreary class filled with mathematical equations, Scott Maxwell offers a bit of a surprise. “Statistics is really a different way of viewing the world,” the Matthew A. Fitzsimon professor of psychology says.

Maxwell thinks that statistics classes are too often taught as a set of formulas. “Ideas get left out,” he says. Statistics can change ways of thinking, he points out, because they offer mathematical “proof” of certain beliefs. “It’s a logical method for changing your ideas,” he says.…

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Mosquito Sleuths: Frank Collins & Nora Besansky

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

One of the deadliest killers on the planet, a tiny vampire known as Anopheles gambiae, is becoming more dangerous. The African mosquito that spreads most of the world’s malaria has developed resistance to chloroquine, the drug traditionally used to treat the disease, and there are signs it is becoming resistant to the insecticide used against it as well. Unless a new strategy is devised to combat malaria, a monstrous public health disaster looms on the horizon. That ominous backdrop underscores the work going on in the lab shared by Frank Collins and Nora Besansky, scientists who joined the ND faculty about two years ago by way of the National Institutes of Health and the Center for Disease Control.…

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Solvent Solver: Joan Brennecke

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Joan F. Brennecke’s research interests — supercritical fluid technology and thermodynamics — are not the stuff of everyday conversation, but their implications could make a lot of manufacturing processes safer for workers and more benign to the environment. “In general,” she says, “what I work on is looking for substitutes for the normal solvents used in industry.”…

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The Reformer: Paul Schultz

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

A framed letter of complaint hangs on the wall of Paul Schultz’s office. It chides him for harboring “a fundamental lack of understanding” of the way financial markets work, and it’s signed by the president of Nasdaq (National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation system), the world’s second largest stock market.…

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The Utility Infielder: James McAdams

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

James McAdams might be viewed as “the professor who came in from the cold.” Before the Berlin Wall came down in 1989, he was one of the first American political scientists to be accepted at East Berlin’s Academy of Sciences. “As a specialist in East Germany,” he says of Communism’s collapse, “I had to deal with the unlikely fact of ‘my’ country disappearing. Some of my contacts in the East went to jail and others turned out to have been spies, people who deceived me.”…

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Catholic Conversationalist: Vince Rougeau

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

In 1990 Vince Rougeau was at a crossroads. He had a bachelor’s degree from Brown and a law degree from Harvard and he had been working for a large law firm in Washington, D.C., for a couple of years — mostly banking law and international trade. “But,” he says, “I realized pretty early that working for a big law firm was not my shtick.”…

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Environmental Protection Agent: Kristin Shrader-Frechette

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The people of Homer, Louisiana, were told they were in for a boon. A multinational business consortium announced plans to build a uranium enrichment plant near the town, and that would mean lots of good-paying jobs. A U.S. senator spoke glowingly of the project; the regional planning commission endorsed it. The only people with any misgivings were the poor African Americans who would live next to the facility. They knew such a health risk would never be allowed near a middle-class suburb, and they didn’t want it in their back yard either.…

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Networker: Laslo Barabasi

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

László Barabási unfolds the sheet of heavy paper across his desk.

It’s a big sheet, bigger than the desk, bigger than many highway maps, and covered with lines and chemical symbols in several colors.

“This represents about the work of several Nobel Prizes,” the associate professor of physics says.

What the document — readily available from a Swiss publisher of teaching aids — shows is scientific shorthand for the world’s accumulated knowledge about how a cell works; it might be called the periodic table of cell biology. Barabási hopes someday to discover the network that undergirds cell development and functioning, making it possible to create a kind of comprehensive schematic diagram of living matter.…

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The Negotiator: Ann Tenbrunsel

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

When she gets some rare time to relax — when her two toddlers are quiet and she’s caught up on her teaching and research projects — Ann Tenbrunsel likes to watch game shows on TV. Shows like Jeopardy and Greed.

“To me, Greed is fascinating,” the associate professor of management says. No surprise that Greed

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