News » Archives » July 2013

Fishing for love

By Becky Banasiak Code '76

Late one spring when I was 7 or 8 years old, I graduated from fishing on the little lake near my family’s cabin in northeastern Michigan to fishing on the mighty Au Sable River about 15 miles north.

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An island in time

By Richard Duffey, M.D., '79

My kids know icons through their electronic world of iPhones, iPads, iPods and MacBooks. But to me, icons suggest images of revered people, places and objects with meanings deeper than apparent on first glance.

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How to shop with a 3-year-old

By Maraya Steadman '89, '90MBA

I read a lot of parenting books. Books about what to expect, what to say, what to buy, how to talk, how to listen, setting limits, setting goals, setting standards, counting blessings, counting costs and counting to three. Now that I’ve been a parent for a while and I’ve read the books, I feel qualified to comment.

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Much more than school

By Kerry Temple ’74

The letter went out in February 2013. Signed by Rev. John Jenkins, CSC, it informed the parents of Notre Dame students that costs were going up again. Even though it pointed out that Notre Dame had kept the annual increase in student charges at 4 percent for the past four years — matching the lowest growth in half a century — the stark numbers were stunning.

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Having coffee with . . . Tim Judge

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

People judge others all the time, and the Notre Dame professor with the appropriate name of Tim Judge probably thinks “What a klutz” when I inadvertently bump our small table. Coffee splashes across the table’s surface and seeps into his printed biographical sketch just as our “having coffee with” chat in the first-floor student lounge of LaFortune begins.

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Deaths in the family

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

In Tales from the Notre Dame Hardwood, Digger Phelps called Mike DeCicco “the Godfather” of the Notre Dame athletic department and talked about DeCicco personally pulling players out of basketball practice to settle academic issues. When Austin Carr ’71 was feted at Notre Dame’s Basketball Ring of Honor ceremony, he invited three people — his mother, his aunt and Mike DeCicco. And when Joe Montana ’79 spoke at his induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, he cited DeCicco’s influence on his life and thanked DeCicco and his wife, Polly, for taking him into their lives and making sure he got to class. He told the Canton audience that you never wanted to get the card that Fighting Irish players in every sport had memorized. It read: “Please report to Mr. DeCicco’s office immediately. No excuses will be tolerated.”…

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Echoes: Gettysburg, 1863

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

William Corby lay dying, stretched out on a bare wooden plank aboard a Union army steamer that was transporting sick and wounded soldiers north up the Chesapeake Bay toward Washington, D.C.

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Seen & heard

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Things we know from the University’s May announcement of a six- to nine-month feasibility study of a “reimagined” Notre Dame Stadium:

1) the University has its eyes on the stadium as a year-round destination for students and visitors in an increasingly pedestrian-friendly campus and is looking at such urban ballparks as Boston’s Fenway Park and Chicago’s Wrigley Field for ideas;…

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Digital Discovery: the hardware

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

It appeared on the cover of Wired magazine last October, billed as “This Machine Will Change the World.” By April, a unit was sitting on a table in the Hesburgh Library’s Fishbowl, fashioning a readily recognizable, 6-inch-tall replica of the Father Sorin statue from a spool of sea-green thermoplastic thread that looked like it might have been pulled from a weed-whacker.

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Digital Discovery: the scholar

By Kara Kelly

A discovery by Mason Roberts ’13, the School of Architecture’s valedictorian, is reopening an old debate over what historians have long considered the original appearance of a temple in the Roman Forum. The key to his surprising finding is a combination of new, high-resolution scanning technology and good old-fashioned principles of classical architecture.

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A technological knockout for head injuries?

By Jason Kelly '95

Obvious concussions are easy to identify. You don’t have to be a doctor to recognize the symptoms: confusion, memory loss, nausea, balance problems. It’s like watching one of those viral videos of someone staggering through a field sobriety test. You just know. The problem is that athletes who suffer head injuries don’t always show such signs.

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The beauty behind the numbers

By Liam Farrell '04

At Notre Dame, teacher-student bonds are likeliest to form over classes devoted to big questions, like debating the existence of God or the ethics of a business decision or a political policy. What makes Connolly’s binder remarkable — at least to anyone who lives each day in fear of numbers — is that all of these relationships were fashioned through math.

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The Wedding Priest

By Tara Hunt ’12

Father Joe Carey, CSC, has a reputation in the University community as the Wedding Priest, and it is well-earned — in his 44 years as a Holy Cross priest, Carey has celebrated nearly 500 weddings, the first of which occurred 14 days after his ordination in April 1969.

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The Playroom: Scars of war

By Maraya Steadman '89, '90MBA

As I pushed a cart around the store’s produce section, I wondered where she was, the mother of C.J. Boyd, which one of these women was she? Which one lost her son? Or maybe it’s a father or a sister who is here in the store with me, carrying their grief as they shop for ordinary things.

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Gettysburg: Of Boys and Battlefields

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

One hundred and fifty years ago, most of the great military minds in the Western Hemisphere collided here, quite by accident, in the company of about 170,000 armed men. The battle lasted three days, July 1-3, 1863, and as the regiments arrived, representing nearly every state from Maine to Texas, they formed curved opposing lines a few miles long.

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