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The George Bailey in all of us

By Patrick Gallagher

I first encountered It’s A Wonderful Life about 30 years ago at Notre Dame. In our sophomore or junior year, one of my friends was shocked to learn that I, the film buff in our group, had never even heard of this classic holiday movie. So when WGN aired it near Christmas, he reserved the Zahm Hall basement party room and we invited our friends to the screening.…

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William the Great

By Maraya Steadman '89, '90MBA

This morning my son threw up his breakfast. He’s not sick. He’s just stressed out about hockey tryouts. He’s 8. This is ridiculous.

“You are awesome,” I tell him. “I’m so proud of you, whatever happens.” On it goes, my cheerleading. But he’s not listen- ing. He’s waiting for the roster.

If he makes Mite 1, he’ll be one of the last kids picked on a roster of 14. If he doesn’t make it, he’ll be a dominant player on Mite 2. And I have no idea what I should want for him. To be one of the best play- ers on the team who gets a zillion minutes of ice time every game, or just another kid on the third line who never gets on the ice for a penalty kill or the last two minutes of a big game — BUT

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Short Stories

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

With his Indiana electoral victory in November, Joe Donnelly ’77, ’81J.D. was able to ascend to the rarified air of the U.S. Senate — and he became just the fourth Notre Dame graduate to serve in that exclusive club.

The records kept by the U.S. Senate provide a glance at the cohort of Domer senators, whose names were culled from history by the University of Notre Dame Archives. All of them, including Donnelly, have been Democrats with backgrounds in law, but only two were popularly elected (one served before the Constitution was amended in 1913 to allow direct election of senators).…

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The shore that calls us home

By Samuel Hazo '49

In 1999 I returned to Notre Dame for the 50-year reunion of the class of 1949. I had missed all previous class reunions for various reasons but decided it was important to come to this one. I might add that my wife, whose ardor for Notre Dame is second to none, may have had something to do with that.…

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A Season to Remember

By Kerry Temple ’74

Last summer we put together an issue to celebrate 125 years of Notre Dame football. It was mostly written in past tense. The subhead of the main feature asked: “Have the tidal shifts in college football finally doomed the independent Irish?”

We then put football in our rearview mirror and headed for our autumn issue. It had lots to do with Ireland but hardly mentioned the football game in Dublin. And a September win over Purdue had me saying to my father-in-law as we left Notre Dame Stadium: “That doesn’t look to me like a team that could beat Michigan or Michigan State.”…

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Building Community

By Kerry Temple ’74

One of the aims of this magazine is to strengthen the bonds between our readers and the University.

We do this in print four times a year. We publish stories on these pages, readers react, many send us letters, some even write stories to share. The conversation moves on a quarterly cycle. It’s limited to a prescribed page count.…

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From Readers

By The editors

The other side

Having spent 30 years of my academic life studying and writing on Ireland, I couldn’t disagree more with the articles by Liam Farrell and Robert Schmuhl that characterized the struggle in northeast Ireland’s six counties as being based largely on sectarian strife between Catholics and Protestants.…

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Having coffee with…Peter Holland

By Tara Hunt ’12

Teacher, scholar, alien, gnomes

Professor Peter Holland welcomes me into his office littered with literature and Shakespeare knickknacks, ready to chat with me for the magazine’s “Having coffee with” series. Alas, he’s already had his morning coffee and I’m on a caffeine retreat, so we have water.

“Water with Peter Holland” sounds pretty dull, we joke, and seems to suggest we’re constructing an environmental piece when in fact we’re here to talk about Shakespeare and America and how students think professors are aliens.…

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An Act of Inclusion

By The editors

A new pastoral plan establishes a student organization for GLBTQ students and others.

The University announced in early December plans to establish a new student organization for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered and questioning (GLBTQ) students and their allies.

The new organization was recommended by the Office of Student Affairs after a five-month review process and is part of a comprehensive plan to promote a more welcoming and inclusive environment while remaining consistent with Notre Dame’s mission and heritage as a Catholic university.…

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Giving them what they need

By Susan Guibert '87, '93M.A.

Do modern parenting practices lead to healthy adults?

I’ll never forget my first “Where did I go wrong?” moment as a young mother.

My second child, a daughter, awoke from her nap and came downstairs into the family room where I was folding laundry. I looked up from the stack of towels to greet my sweet 3-year-old but was temporarily rendered speechless.…

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Echoes: Washington Hall

By Mark C. Pilkinton

‘The perfect hall for public entertainments’

Washington Hall has been a busy place since its dedication in 1882, and nearly everyone who has studied at Notre Dame has some memory of it. Some recall attending orientation meetings there when they first arrived or convocations when they were about to graduate. Those getting married may have taken Father Theodore Hesburgh’s renowned Pre-Cana class there. Notre Dame students have filled the auditorium in Washington Hall to see their peers act in plays, to watch movies, to experience music in all its forms, to attend lectures or take classes and examinations. Some have heard the world’s movers and shakers — from Tom Dooley to Mario Cuomo — speak from the Washington Hall stage.…

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Seen and heard

By The editors

The campus community mourned the deaths of two students during the autumn semester. Ziqi Zhang, 19, a spirited Saint Mary’s College sophomore from China who took engineering classes at Notre Dame, died October 18 after colliding with a vehicle while riding her bicycle near the Saint Mary’s entrance on Indiana 933. The body of Colorado native Michael Thigpen

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Deaths in the Family

By The editors

Edward A. Goerner

For many years before he died on October 2 at the age of 82, Edward a. Goerner and his family lived in The Lilacs, a pale yellow brick house built in 1889 for a Notre Dame professor at the corner of Notre Dame Avenue and Napoleon Boulevard, which Goern- er had restored in the late 1960s.…

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A place I once knew

By Liquid error: internal

A young man goes to Paris as every young man should
There’s something in the air of France
that does a young man good.

I was barely 22 when I went to Paris, at once naive and brash, weary of studying and working for tuition, a “day hop” Siena College graduate anxious to get away from home. I tagged along with a college mate who planned to finish his French requirement at a summer course in the Sorbonne. It was 1963, and in my pocket was a one-way ticket and $400. A student ship took us from New York to Le Havre, then a train to Paris where I spent the first night in a park propped up against my brother’s Marine Corps duffle bag. I had not enough French, but enough spunk.…

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Being Skylar Diggins

By Ann Hardie ’82

What if Skylar Diggins ’13 had committed to Stanford University at the eleventh hour instead of Notre Dame — a decision she came close to making? Seems a good time to ask, now that the Irish’s best-known female athlete, one of its best-known athletes period, is playing her final season for the women’s basketball team.…

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Where kids go fishin’

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

If only those shadowy monsters hiding in the closet or under the bed or outside the window — a wide-eyed toddler can attest that you never know where they might be lurking — were the only threats kids face. Parents know better.

As do recent grandparents Jean Derbes Ratté ’74 and Geoffrey Ratté ’75. While they know they can’t vanquish the world’s very real dangers, the Rattés are doing what they can to enlist today’s children in safe, wholesome activities.…

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ND or Bama: Who loves you, baby?

By Tara Hunt ’12

I limited the amount of ND gear I brought south of the Mason-Dixon with me, fearing I would receive undue attention both in Miami and in Atlanta, where I rang in the New Year. I didn’t want SEC folk ganging up on me and rattling my already shaky cage by hooting and hollering that Notre Dame didn’t deserve its BCS bid.

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Irish Boys of Brooklyn: New Year’s Eve 1973

By Sara Felsenstein ’12

Some would say bartenders John Pelan and Harold Kelly had the best spot in the house that New Year’s Eve. All night, off in an alcove behind their simple makeshift bar, Pelan and Kelly poured foaming pitchers of Budweiser and stirred up the occasional whiskey and ginger ale. A radio in the corner spouted updates from the Notre Dame-Alabama national championship game.

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Time to lose a football bet

By Laura Rompf Soldato ’02, ’04M.E.

Eight years ago I made a bet with my husband’s best friend, Casey. We were on a double date and were amid yet another preseason conversation where Dan and Casey, the eternal Notre Dame-football optimists, were spewing outlandish statements about Notre Dame’s upcoming season. I have been an Irish fan since birth, but at that now infamous dinner with Casey, with utmost confidence, I declared: “Casey, I bet you $100 that I will have three children before Notre Dame wins a national championship.”

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Global Doc: Onward to Haiti

By Dr. Vincent DeGennaro Jr. ’02

In May 2010, life in Haiti was chaotic at baseline, and in a massive tent hospital with over two hundred employees and a hundred American volunteers, it was difficult to maintain any semblance of order. I haven’t been to Haiti since then.

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Soundings: The time of my life

By Kerry Temple ’74

My first awareness of anti-Notre Dame sentiments came in 1966. It was especially puzzling because it came from classmates at my Catholic high school whose religious affiliation did not override their loyalty toward Southeastern Conference football.

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