News » Archives » 2014

Out of the office: Getting there

By Kerry Temple ’74

Even at semester’s end, after three months swimming in these rivers, I make my way — always against the current, up the down staircase, entering as others exit — feeling like a foreigner unschooled in the ways of flocks and herds.

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Out of the office: Library renovation

By Tara Hunt ’12

It was this now-fond memory that brought me to the library yesterday as they hosted their “Farewell to the Floor” event, a way to kick off the first phase of the Hesburgh Library Renovation. The makeover is scheduled to start Monday, December 22, and will begin with a new north entrance and then a two-story entrance gallery that will run through the center of the library.

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What I’m Reading: The Divide, Matt Taibbi

By Brendan O’Shaughnessy ’93

Written by Rolling Stone political reporter Matt Taibbi, The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap provides dozens of similar stories of prosecutors going after poor people for minor crimes at the same time it lets the wealthy off with at most a company fine for gargantuan fraud.

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The seagull professor

By Lucy Negash '15

I knew that Richard Sheehan, an economics professor, had found his passion in wildlife photography. What surprised me was his saying he approached the task by emulating the seagull.

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Out of the office: A&L career night

By Kerry Temple ’74

They have come in the night, in the dark, crunching through snow, faces strafed by the wind. And now they sit in a LaFortune meeting room, long tables arranged in a big square, to hear a panel of people speak and answer questions, give pep talks and offer advice.

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What I’m Reading: Parched, Melanie Crowder

By Stacy A. Nyikos ’90

When I was at Notre Dame, apartheid was in full swing, which makes me feel both incredibly old . . . and hopeful. Old because, let’s face it, the 1980s was a long time ago. And hopeful, because that kind of discrimination was overcome. By humans. In my lifetime.

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Global Doc: Quarantine

By Dr. Vincent DeGennaro Jr. ’02

Quarantine for patients or health care workers was not considered a valid option during the swine flu epidemic, but now with one imported case of Ebola in New York City, quarantine has been implemented in several states in direct opposition to experts at the CDC and World Health Organization (WHO). Fear and politics, not science, are the reasons behind these contrasting policies.

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Articulate: Dia de los Muertos

By Gina Costa

As much of the Western world prepares to celebrate Halloween, another important celebration parallels this tradition and is gaining popularity: Día de los Muertos, or the Day of the Dead.

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Out of the office: Domer delicacies

By Tara Hunt ’12

When I was studying abroad in Angers, France, my host mother, Chantal, decided I had the potential to be an ideal French wife — I’m not sure if that was a compliment, insult or if it had anything to do with the fact that she had three sons, but she began a five-month mission to train me in her likeness.

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Articulate: Alumni artists

By Gina Costa

The Snite Museum of Art is currently hosting the exhibition “ND Alumni: Sculptors and Professors,” which highlights the work of the graduates of Notre Dame’s Department of Art, Art History, and Design once they leave the university with a Master of Fine Arts degree.

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What I’m Reading: The Nine Tailors, Dorothy L. Sayers

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

The bell tower of the Basilica of the Sacred Heart isn’t on the standard Notre Dame campus tour for good reason. It’s kind of a dangerous place. The wooden stairs are narrow and steeply pitched, and the first flight alone is sufficiently dusty and Hitchcockian as to discourage anyone but the most determined and cautious visitor.

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Out of the office: The goose family

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

One of my favorite things about working at Notre Dame is how much I learn in informal discussions. Someone lunching at Café de Grasta may bring up the issue of Ebola and how protecting Americans from the disease could endanger our beloved civil liberties. And sometimes, like in my chat with the Korean student, I may hear a tidbit that opens my eyes to an intriguing cultural trend. And without setting foot in a classroom, I learn something.

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Even rockstars have curfews

By Matt Cashore '94

According to billboard.com, the highest attended rock tour of 2013 was Bon Jovi, with a total attendance of just under 2.2 million. According to The Blue Angels website, the Blue Angels perform in front of an estimated 11 million people per year.

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