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Warren Cartier’s home field

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Warren A. Cartier, an 1887 Notre Dame civil engineering graduate, donated land and lumber to establish an enclosed athletic field that for decades was home to ND’s football, baseball, and track and field teams. But it is in the neoclassical Ludington, Michigan, mansion he designed that Warren’s aesthetic and inventive character can be seen.

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Echoes: Cartier Athletic Field

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Once there was a time, another century, when admission to Notre Dame home football games was free. Of course, fans had to stand on the sidelines, as stadium seating did not exist. But then, neither did a stadium.

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Seen & heard

By The editors

“No organ builder worth his salt will build an organ for a space that’s carpeted,” says Father Peter Rocca, CSC, ’70, ’73M.A, rector of the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. Carpet, apparently a post-Vatican II design move to make churches more inviting, eats sound. So, anticipating the installation by early 2016 of a $3.2 million instrument crafted by acclaimed Tacoma, Washington, designer Paul Fritts, the Basilica closed the day after Christmas for an overhaul of its flooring. Forty-four days later, the last of 25,000 textured, slate-colored porcelain tiles was laid, completing a $500,000 renovation project that has drawn raves for giving the 125-year-old church a more beautiful, European feel. Fritts has also created pipe organs for Notre Dame’s Reyes Organ Recital Hall and the rehearsal room in Coleman-Morse Hall named for the late Basilica organist and choir director Gail Walton. . . .…

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We Are Hope-Brokers in Hell

By Antonio Anderson, SOLT, ’85

God is love, we learned in grade school catechism in Chicago or Houston or wherever we grew up, but here in the midst of a civil war in which, by some estimates, 100,000 Mexicans have been killed throughout the country in the last six years, it is essential to reiterate that revelation: God is love.

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Letter from Campus: Breakfast with Clarence Thomas

By Elizabeth Argue '14

“Have any of you ever worked in sugar cane fields? I have, and it is hard work. Education is everything.” I suddenly feel foolish. Sitting stiffly in a jacket, skirt and heels, I shake my head at his question. We all do. No, I have never even seen a field of sugar cane.

The eight undergraduates at breakfast are fellows in the Tocqueville Program for Inquiry Into Religion and American Public Life. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is teaching at the Notre Dame Law School for a week, and he agreed to meet us before his class.…

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A prescription to end chemo dread

By John Monczunski

Cancer patients are often ambivalent about chemotherapy. On the one hand, the powerful drugs save and extend countless lives. On the other, they may cause nausea and vomiting so debilitating that patients sometimes postpone or even stop therapy.

Since the 1990s, however, a variety of drugs have been developed that curtail chemotherapy-induced queasiness. The problem is that these medications have been ridiculously expensive. Until now.…

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What We've Done

By The editors

Rob Nabors, illustration by Emmett Baggett

Rob Nabors ’93 is President Obama’s deputy chief of staff. . . . Thaddeus “T.J.” Jones ’89 serves on the Pontifical Council for Social Communications — he’s the pope’s Twitter guy. #Wow. . . . John Sears ’60 was Ronald Reagan’s campaign manager and Richard Allen ’57, ’58M.A.

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We Are . . . .

By The editors

Theodore M. Hesburgh CSC,
Red Smith,
Jean Lenz OSV,
David Gaus,
Frank O’Malley,
Gustavo Gutierrez,
Steve Bartman,
Ara Parseghian,
Cindy Parseghian,
Molly Kinder,
Bob McDonnell,
Bruce Babbitt,
William H. Dempsey,
Joe Evans,
Mark Shields,
George Dohrmann,
Haley Scott DeMaria,
Tony Bill,
Bill Toohey CSC,
Jane Pitz,
Tom Moe,

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A Thousand Lives in One

By Tara Hunt ’12

This is a tale of a man. A man who is a cowboy. A cowboy who became a boxer. A boxer who was a Marine. A Marine who smuggled whiskey. A whiskey smuggler who became a movie stuntman. A stuntman who started writing novels. A novelist who has lived a thousand lives in the time most people have lived one.

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On The Deck

By Bill Ehrlich ’09

I arrived on the construction site as a Chicago Local 134 Union electrician on September 23, 2013; I had learned the basics of electrical work during three-months of apprenticeship classes last summer. But upon arriving at the unfinished 50-story building, I felt like I had landed in a foreign country.

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Stories of us

By None

First-year student Sara Abdel-Rahim is a long way from her conservative Muslim family’s home in Florida, and an even longer way from the family’s homeland in Egypt. When she chose to come to Notre Dame, Abdel-Rahim didn’t even know it was a Catholic school. Spring visitation convinced her that this was her collegiate home — “There’s something in the bricks,” she says with a smile, showing that she knows her ND history.…

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The business and art of the funnies

By Jamie Reidy ’92

It’s fitting that Sheldon, the eponymous character in Dave Kellett’s comic strip, made his fortune in software. After all, his creator has maximized technological advances to become a leading online cartoonist.

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We are all of us

By Kerry Temple ’74

This issue started with an idea that’s been around awhile — the concept of the “Notre Dame man.” Three decades ago the editors here talked about doing a story that answered the question, “What do we mean by the ‘Notre Dame man?’”

At one time the phrase meant something significant. It was an ideal. I still get a handful of letters each year from alums who have written about a father who has died; they talk about their father’s strong but quiet life and all the good he did. “He was a true Notre Dame man,” they conclude. In the past year or two I have written obituaries of colleagues here, and each time I have thought those three words the best summation of their lives.…

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Deaths in the family

By The editors

At age 12, Bill Storey ’54M.A., ’59Ph.D., joined the Catholic Church because he felt haunted by God. His conversion, and his acute thirst for prayer, the Eucharist and truth, would inspire generations of students during his 18-year tenure at Notre Dame. He was 90 when he died on January 16.

When he returned to Notre Dame in 1967, Storey was assigned to teach in the doctoral program in liturgical studies, but he was soon tapped to design a new undergraduate theology major. His classes on church history, which he often taught in his home, overflowed with eager pupils. Decades later former students could be found visiting him at Erasmus Books, the bookstore he and his partner, Philip Schatz ’72, ’74M.A., established and owned in South Bend.…

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Being there

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

The long drop in religious vocations has caught up with the way Notre Dame recruits its rectors. What’s the future of the University’s unique residence hall system?

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Crossroad Project keys construction

By Kerry Temple ’74

While the campus expansion in recent times may have caused a mild case of disorientation in those returning for an occasional football game or reunion, the next wave of construction projects may prove even more dizzying to those who stay away too long.

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To the bottom and back

By Loretta Hoch Rietsema ’80

When I collected my diploma in 1980, I congratulated myself on a well-lubricated education. Unknown to me as I chugged and cheered my way through senior week was that I had also progressed quite nicely on my journey into the disease of alcoholism.

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Who We Are

By The editors

The stereotype does exist. Catholic. White. Male. The stereotype — like all stereotypes — comes from intelligible truths.

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