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The meeting place

By Jay Walljasper

Bill Kauffman stands out as a poster child for independent thinking about the political future of our country. His book Look Homeward America: In Search of Reactionary Radicals and Front- Porch Anarchists was published by the uncompromising right-wing publisher ISI Books and endorsed by left-wing luminary Gore Vidal. A former aide to Democratic Senator Pat Moynihan and a former editor at the libertarian magazine Reason

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Deaths

By None

Richard T. Danahy ‘38, 10/09/2013, Buffalo, NY
Paul F. Eble ‘38, 01/22/2014, Angola, IN
Henry N. Rogers ‘40, 11/28/2013, Arlington Heights, IL
S. Louis Belli ‘42, 11/29/2013, Titusville, NJ
John P. Meyer ‘42, 10/31/2013, Danville, IL
Paul E. Wack ‘42 MS, ’47 PHD, 11/19/2013, Portland, OR
George J. Kelly ‘43, 11/01/2013, Parkville, MD

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Soundings: Deceptive winter

By Kerry Temple ’74

A talk radio commentator was ranting the other day about the global warming “hoax.” He said this winter was evidence that the planet isn’t getting any hotter and that climate change talk is mere propaganda.

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Soundings: All is not fair

By Kerry Temple ’74

Basketball is a messy game. It is even messier for 9-year-olds who can’t help but double-dribble, who swarm to the ball like moths to a porch-light and who take too many steps when none is allowed.

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Ms. Jansen's choices

By Elle Metz '12

I’m convinced there is no set curriculum in my mother’s class. There are definitely no tests. I’m also convinced that it’s the most important class those fifth graders may ever take. She teaches them how to be good humans.

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Global Doc: Rubbing elbows

By Dr. Vincent DeGennaro Jr. ’02

The last time I sat at the United Nations headquarters was for a conference on HIV and AIDS seven years ago. In January, I returned for a conference on the same topic, this time focused on how sports can reinforce the messages of HIV prevention.

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An old love letter to the University

By Matt Storin ’64

In the summer of 1960 I found at my local library in Springfield, Massachusetts, a book on Notre Dame. Now, almost 54 years later, I’ve been a student, a parent, a faculty member, an administrator, an advisory council member and, of course, an alumnus. So when I happened across another copy of the book, Notre Dame: the story of a great university by Richard T. Sullivan (Henry Holt and Company, 1951), I wanted to read it from that perspective.

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A Dark, African Night

By Kevin Bailey '08

The transition is instant. As the door opens, I step out of the pleasant air conditioning and I’m instantly hit with the thick, full heat of a Ugandan morning. This morning, like all mornings here on the equator, is just picking up steam as the sun heads toward the highest spot in the sky.

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The 42nd Street Hawker

By Sara Felsenstein '12

The scene is so absurd. It’s 9 a.m. in New York City and thousands of people rush, straight faced, to wherever they need to be. And then there’s Geoff, relentlessly happy, sending sparks of enthusiasm to anyone who walks by.

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Soundings: Olympic ideals

By Kerry Temple ’74

I grew up under the cloud of Cold War hostility. The Olympics became a staging ground for international rivalries, with U.S. athletes doing their patriotic best to beat Soviet bloc countries and show which political and economic system was superior. Athletes, whether they liked it or not, bore the weight of global power posturing.

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Return to the Durd

By Greer Hannan '09

Travel-worn and weary, I stepped over the uneven threshold into Dan the Durd’s snug cottage and the years fell away from me. The place had not changed in five years and neither had Dan’s warmth and welcome.

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The Playroom: Not Me

By Maraya Steadman '89, '90MBA

It’s minus something outside. Cold enough to cancel school, cold enough to stay indoors all day, cold enough to wonder why we live this far north of moderate and cold enough for my kids to invite that other kid, “I’m so bored” over to not play.

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A Slice of Life

By Reggie Henke ’12

My car pulls into the driveway as a stranger peeks through the blinds eagerly awaiting my arrival. She doesn’t know me, but she’s friendly and welcoming at the door. If I do my job right our interaction is brief, businesslike and satisfying.

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