News » Archives » 2016

Wise man’s misdirection

By Brian Doyle ’78

It was my dad who brought me to college for my admissions interview. The college was 700 miles from our house. We drove through the night. I was 17. My father was younger than I am now. It was autumn. The college campus was the most collegiate campus you could ever imagine. It was exactly what you thought a college campus would be. It was obviously a set for a film about college.

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The outlook for global futures

By Jason Kelly '95

The scale of predicted damage from climate change, with economic fallout estimated to reach hundreds of trillions of dollars, will require an environmental bailout in which human investment must be total.

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What bothered me most

By Tara Begley Wegener ’80

“He’s right over there,” the receptionist directed after buzzing me into the neonatal intensive care unit. Other than that familiar hospital soundtrack of persistent beeping, the unit was quiet as I walked toward my client’s incubator. “Hi, I’m your lawyer,” I said softly as I peeked at my 15-day-old client.

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The Fighting Irish

By Robert Schmuhl ’70

The bloody fighting between combative Irish nationalists and the British military didn’t escape the attention of students and faculty on the Notre Dame campus.

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Home marathon

By Michael Augsberger ’10

I was lounging in a bathtub when the police called. Despite the messy relationship between flip-phones and water, I managed to answer.

illustration by Nolan Pellitier

“Would you like to come down to the barracks?” the state trooper asked.

You don’t hide from the police, especially if you have something to hide. Good liars don’t feel the tremors, the sweat, the Sherman McCoy panic, the overall social ineptitude that plague me in these situations. That evening, as the trooper led me downstairs to the interrogation room, I struggled even to walk. I could go to jail.

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Deaths in the family

By The editors

Jack Lloyd ’58, who became one of the most familiar and distinctive voices of Notre Dame sports in nearly 50 years as a public address announcer, died in September after a brief illness. He was 79.

During Lloyd’s long tenure, he was known as a consummate professional, an all the more impressive reputation because he was never paid.…

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Editor's note: Neighbors

By Kerry Temple ’74

When I was in journalism school 40 years ago, we learned about those factors that went into making news judgments. One was proximity — the value of the hometown story, of localizing news, giving greater weight to events near at hand, looking into the distance (the war in Vietnam, for instance) only as foreign affairs affected us. We were warned not to focus on problems in distant parts of the world while ignoring stories closer to home.…

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My Church and Me

By Andrew Barlow '88

The Holy Father’s recent visit to America brought back some warm memories from my very Catholic childhood, when the pope was something of a hero in our house. Not only had Paul VI made the post-Vatican II folk Mass in the St. Vincent’s gym possible, he also validated sprawling families like ours (14 kids) when he condemned contraception in his _Humanae Vitae_.

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The Usual

By Matt Cashore '94

Father Hesburgh’s signature cocktail was a Manhattan, done his way. Nobody made ’em like Patrick Denis Murphy.

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Murf

By Tess Gunty '15

Notre Dame’s consummate bartender does more than serve up drinks. He’s counselor, companion, philosopher, poet, ambassador, storyteller, sweetheart, teacher, diplomat, legend and friend to all who enter there.

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Poetic Man of God

By Michael N. McGregor

Robert Lax went to Patmos to pursue his art and the creative expression of a solitary, spiritual life. I did as well, discovering there his quiet gifts of grace.

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Gifts Opened Later

By Steve Adams

Sometimes we launch our creations into the world not knowing where they land. Sometimes they turn up having done some good, having made a difference, and maybe we find out.

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