News » Archives » 2016

What I’m Reading: Ms. Bixby’s Last Day, John David Anderson

By Kerry Temple ’74

I picked up Mrs. Bixby’s Last Day when looking for a book for my kids to read. They weren’t interested in it and, because the book’s premise is a middle-school teacher who has cancer and not long to live. Still, my kids are in middle school and death is something worth thinking about and one of the cover blurbs said, “Kids won’t just love this book. They need it.” It’s been a hit.

Read More

Concussions, continued

By Matt Storin ’64

The National Football League draws a lot of negative attention when it comes to concussions and player safety, but I would argue the NFL is better equipped to deal with these issues than the college game. Two controversies within four days in the early season make the point.

Read More

Out of the Office: A Supreme Speaker

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Parade magazine reported in its September 9th issue that 10 percent of college grads polled thought Judge Judy was on the U.S. Supreme Court, but it was an actual Supreme Court justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who showed up on campus on September 12th to address Notre Dame students and members of the public.

Read More

To Trump or Not to Trump

By Rasmus Jorgensen

What is a conservative to do this November? Trump? Or, “#NeverTrump”? Those questions drew an estimated 300 people to a packed LaFortune Ballroom last Friday.

Read More

Electing the President 2016: The Evil of Two Lessers

By Robert Schmuhl ’70

At the beginning of class the other day, I circulated a questionnaire for the 26 duly-enrolled Millennial Domers in my course on American Political and Media Culture. Besides wanting to know their partisan and ideological preferences, their pushing-70 teacher wanted to gauge student opinion about contemporary political figures and this year’s presidential free-for-all from the anonymous surveys.

Read More

Global Doc: When Doctors Strike

By Dr. Vincent DeGennaro Jr. ’02

The Haitian doctors’ strike ended last week and it is unclear if there are any winners. The conditions in which the striking doctors work are appalling and the low pay was galling, but without the doctors, hospitals shut their doors and the poor were left to take care of their own illnesses and injuries for nearly five months.

Read More

What I’m Reading: Living Gently in a Violent World, Stanley Hauerwas and Jean Vanier

By William Schmitt

Sorting through my home office always turns up pleasant surprises, including books I really should read now that they’ve emerged from long-ignored stacks. The timing was especially fortunate this summer because my rediscovered Living Gently in a Violent World: The Prophetic Witness of Weakness offers an antidote to the toxins exploding all over the news.

Read More

Brexit Broken Open

By Rasmus Jorgensen

“It is possible that a year ago some of you might have not even heard the term ‘Brexit,’” Notre Dame political science Professor A. James McAdams said last Monday, kicking off a panel discussion of the United Kingdom’s democratic decision in June to leave the European Union. As a matter of fact, I had.

Read More

The Basilica's Cloud of Witnesses

By Rick Becker

Stepping inside the Basilica of the Sacred Heart is like showing up at a family reunion in full swing. The Basilica’s walls and ceiling are crammed with images of the Catholic family in paint and stained glass: Saints and martyrs, prophets and patriarchs, so many forebears of the faith.

Read More

Thoughts on Welcome Weekend, from the Other Side of the Car Window

By Rick Becker

For two years straight, my wife and I made the rounds to all the Welcome Weekend activities, meals and presentations. It was all very informative, very reassuring. But I’ll tell you, nothing could top those first enthusiastic greetings we received as we pulled into the parking-lot staging areas for drop-off.

Read More

Shakespeare's Tempest in a Year of Rage and Mercy

By A.P. Monta

Nearly everyone in Shakespeare’s The Tempest is imprisoned by illusions, and the Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival’s production of it is full of them. But as director West Hyler points out, breaking free of illusions requires something beyond violent struggle and a desire for retribution.

Read More

The Murdy Family Organ Has Finally Arrived

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

It’s here. It took ten years of planning, nail-biting and hopeful angst at Notre Dame; three-and-a-half years of designing, pipe casting and precision carpentry at the Paul Fritts workshop in Tacoma, Washington; and a cross-country journey of some 2,100 miles spanning three time zones and the Continental Divide. Now, at last, the Murdy Family Organ has reached its permanent home inside the Basilica of the Sacred Heart.

Read More

You're Not Listening to Me

By Chris Lowery '72

It may be, as my father warned me on the eve of my marriage — marriage being an apt metaphor for the indissoluble relationship among the races in America — that the very struggle to achieve the common understanding that eludes us is intensifying our frustrations.

Read More

Kids vs. The Bard: Who Wins?

By Christina Payne '16

“Friends, Romans, Countrymen!” Christy Burgess calls, raising one arm to command attention. “Lend me your ears!” the students shout back. And thus does one of Shakespeare’s most memorable lines settle Shakespeare summer campers at Notre Dame.

Read More

Electing the President 2016: What Unites Us

By Robert Schmuhl ’70

Now that the Republican and Democratic national conventions are history, one common denominator of the 2016 presidential campaign stands out in bold relief. Both major parties this fall will be united by high-decibel hatred of the nominee of the other party.

Read More