News » Archives » 2017

Seen & heard

By The editors

Notre Dame philosopher Alvin Plantinga, whose influential arguments for the existence of God helped redefine the academic debate on the subject, has been named the recipient of the 2017 Templeton Prize.

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The life he built

By Jason Kelly '95

Many cockroaches were harmed in the making of Andy Greco’s college education. He killed 60 of them one night in a massacre that Greco ’81 assumes must still be commemorated in the cockroach community.

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Detours on the road home

By Patrick Gallagher '83

While there’s something undeniably amusing about an 80-year-old sweet, gentle lady letting loose with a string of expletives, it was a symptom of something unfunny — the decline of her health, her cognitive abilities, her will — her self.

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The balm of still waters

By Gina Wakerly Rich ’00

My love of the water began at an early age. In my baby book, my mom shares her account of my baptism, noting: “Gina did not cry as the water was poured over her head; in fact, she liked it!”

Growing up in northern California, I spend summer days splashing around the pool at the YMCA, stalking the teenage lifeguards who look impossibly cool in their red swimsuits. When I am 6 years old, my dad oversees the installation of an L-shaped pool in our backyard. It looks like something out of The Flintstones

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So much depends upon the piebald deer

By John Singleton

In the summer of my 10th year there were rumors of an unidentified creature moving among deer herds between the Severn and Magothy rivers. The animal was described as white, stump-legged, with a bushy tail. The idea of something big and mysterious, moving on land, captured my boyish imagination.

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Letter from campus: Uncorrected proof

By Kerry Temple ’74

Here is a little-known truth about Notre Dame Magazine: Carol Schaal ’91M.A., the managing editor, would be named the magazine’s Most Valuable Player if the award were put to a vote of the staff. Probably by unanimous decision.

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Sounding off about art

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

The writer, producer and host of the ArtCurious podcasts compares her unpaid evening and weekend work on the show to a different activity. “I basically tell everybody that it’s kind of like my golf,” says Jennifer Dasal ’04M.A. “It takes up a lot of my time, and it’s too expensive.”

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Another anniversary

By Kerry Temple ’74

Every year — along about commencement season — the Notre Dame lakefronts become toddler playgrounds for fuzzy little ducks and geese. Waddling in the grass, stumbling and scooting to keep up, trailing mothers single file, they eventually skim the placid waters like little bathtub toys.

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What I’m Reading: Battle Cry of Freedom, James McPherson

By Liam Farrell '04

It’s summer when I think about the Civil War. I think of childhood trips with dappled sunlight on Burnside’s Bridge at Antietam and the cool touch of Devil’s Den boulders at Gettysburg. So nostalgia, probably more than intellectual curiosity, is what led me to start reading James McPherson’s Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era.

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Miss Christy

By Jason Kelly '95

“Costumes don’t define who we are. It’s characters.” That sounds just like something Christy Burgess would say, but she’s not within earshot. Her students are channeling her.

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Armored love

By Video by Ryan Blaske

Director Christy Burgess and actors from the Robinson Shakespeare Company discuss what the ensemble means to them as they prepare for a summer trip to perform in England.

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What I’m Reading: Wait, What? James E. Ryan

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Ask any college graduate what their commencement speaker said, and chances are you’ll get a shrug in return. On May 26, 2016, however, James Ryan, dean of Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education, managed to keep his audience charmed with an address that then went viral online. An expanded version of that speech has since been turned into a book: Wait, What?: And Life’s Other Essential Questions.

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Rest in piece

By Brian Doyle ’78

Since it’s just you and me here on the page, and no one else can hear us, let’s both cheerfully admit that we have, in moments of delicious melancholy, thought about our own funerals.

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Those people who live in Crazytown

By Rasmus Jorgensen

How often, in the course of a conversation about politics, society, culture, have you heard the phrase “Any reasonable person would say . . .”? We feel that whatever claim we make after it must be true, but the implication is that those who disagree are unreasonable — and maybe worse.

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His Last Game

By Brian Doyle ’78

Brian Doyle ’78 died early Saturday morning, May 27, having been diagnosed with a brain tumor last November. Remembering him now along with so many of his colleagues, fans, friends and family all over the country, we reprint here one of our favorite of his essays, which Brian wrote about his brother, Kevin Doyle ’69, himself dying of cancer in 2012.

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What I’m Reading: Ernie’s America, edited by David Nichols

By Ken Bradford '76

I re-read the Ernie Pyle columns in Ernie’s America for many reasons. First, he was an outstanding writer who saw the story inside a person other people might ignore. And, like a lot of us, Pyle was curious. He earned his credibility because he saw things with his own eyes. He reported what he knew, without embellishment.

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