News » Archives » 2017

Just a Few More Dreams

By Michelle Mann ’17

After listening to the speeches of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during a long road trip, a Notre Dame student pinpoints more dreams she believes our culture should achieve.

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Navel gazing

By Reggie Henke ’12

Reggie Henke’s essay about being in a sensory deprivation chamber received an honorable mention in this magazine’s 2016 Young Alumni Essay Contest.

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What I’m Reading: The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins

By Josh Stowe '01

When I picked up a copy of The Girl on the Train from my local library a few weeks ago, I felt like I was the last person to learn what all the fuss was about. The book had been out for more than a year, and everyone I knew, it seemed, had already read it was reading it, or wanted to read it. A movie based on the book had just come out. We had reached peak Girl on the Train.

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Domers in the news

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Will the Cleveland Indians, that other team in the 2016 World Series, earn another run at the baseball championship this year? We’re bad at predictions here, but if that were to happen, Jeff Manship ’08 probably will not again be part of it. The right-handed pitcher signed with the Indians in 2014 and was one of the five relievers used by the Tribe in game 3 of its American League Championship Series against the Toronto Blue Jays. In game 2 of the World Series, he was the fifth pitcher of the night. But Manship, who turns 32 this month and previously played for the Minnesota Twins, Colorado Rockies and Philadelphia Phillies, was not offered a new contract by the Indians. . . . A house designed by Chicago architect Patricia Craig ’82

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Letter from Campus: Champion

By Kerry Temple ’74

Tom Suddes ’71 died September 26 at age 67. It’s hard to believe. Tom Suddes was a life force not easily extinguished — even with his two-year battle against amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease. There’s no way his life story ends there, though.

For one thing, there is the legacy. His lasting impact on generations of Notre Dame students — as a volunteer. Living on in the lives he changed. Hard to imagine anyone else making such tremendous personal contributions to the place as an unpaid volunteer. Few have made such a difference as full-time employees.…

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Deaths in the family

By The editors

Rev. James J. McGrath, CSC, ’55, whose campus contributions included key roles in the construction of the Galvin Life Science Center and the sandy beach at St. Joseph Lake, died October 24 at age 84.

McGrath, professor emeritus of biology, taught numerous botany courses and also served as a dorm rector, chaplain of the Notre Dame Fire Department and as a parish priest in Dowagiac, Michigan.…

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Seen & heard

By The editors

Notre Dame’s Academic Council voted on a new core curriculum in November, approving what University President John I. Jenkins, CSC, ’76, called the most significant changes in nearly 50 years. The new core, to be implemented in fall 2018 with the incoming Class of 2022, will continue to require all students to complete two theology and two philosophy courses — although the second philosophy requirement could be met with a course in a new category called “Catholicism and the Disciplines.”…

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Finding the lens

By Eric Butterman

Imagine your day as an assistant director at a gallery in New York City, where your focus is on photography, perhaps working with Annie Leibovitz or Elliott Erwitt. You feel like you can step into the photos. One day, Erik Rocca ’06 did just that. “A photographer suggested I contact this agency because they thought I could get work as a model,” he says. “I thought, ‘why not?’”

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You’ve got a friend

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Olivia Godby ’16 once spent four hours pretending to be a cat, meowing as people walked by. Not your typical high school student’s summer activity, but Godby was a counselor at a camp for those with developmental disabilities and that playful diversion was all one camper wanted to do. Volunteering at the camp and with Special Olympics, says Godby, made her passionate about supporting those who might be unable to speak on their own behalf.

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I am the sin-eater

By Mark Phillips

My turn came. I spoke about an old and now abandoned Gaelic and English tradition of hiring a sin-eater to be present at the wake of a loved one who died with an endangered soul. After a chunk of bread and bowl of beer or wine were placed on the corpse, the sin-eater ate sacrificially of the offering, absorbing the sins of the dearly departed and thereby allowing the soul a possibility of heavenly immortality.

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