Hope at Risk

By Anthony Walton '82

After witnessing decades of apparent progress toward a more racially unified nation, an African American is coming to believe the schism is deeper than he imagined.

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Freedom: With Freedom and Justice for All

By Anthony Walton '82

As I viewed the television images of the newly liberated Iraqis cycling through emotions of joy, relief and rage, it underscored once again for me the fundamental importance of the role of freedom in human affairs. Watching the Iraqi celebration also has brought to mind certain ironies concerning our own country: Why, in a society with traditions of economic opportunity and social mobility, do significant portions of the population live as though they are not free? What is to be done?…

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The Eye of the Needle: Katharine Drexel

By Anthony Walton '82

At the 1975 canonization of Elizabeth Seton, the first American-born saint, Pope Paul VI remarked that the “temporal prosperity” of the United States seems “to obscure and make almost impossible” the renunciation of self and dedication to religion traditionally found in the lives of those canonized by the Catholic church. The material temptations of the “good life” as well as the complex work, social and familial situations of this fast-paced nation seem to leave little space for spiritual cultivation of any kind—let alone of sufficient magnitude to qualify for sainthood. Katharine Drexel, the second native-born American so honored by the church, faced the challenges of “temporal prosperity” to such extremes as to make her canonization perhaps the most unlikely of all.…

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