Wondering Out Loud

By Ed Cohen

What’s the difference between an orchestra and a symphony or a philharmonic?

Today, very little.

Orchestras — sometimes called symphony orchestras — and philharmonics both perform symphonies, those elaborate instrumental compositions in three or more movements. Technically, “philharmonic” can refer to any musical organization. The word comes from the French philharmonique

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Now I Dream of Concrete Sculpture

By Ed Cohen

About a year ago I started to get that feeling of unease that sometimes descends upon men in their early 40s like me. Not the one about the expanding forehead. This was that feeling that maybe I wasn’t doing what I was meant to do career-wise. You know — that my life had been a tragic misguided waste, at least during normal business hours.…

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Campus cemetery may open to alumni

By Ed Cohen

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Stories are legion of people trying to sprinkle their loved ones’ ashes on the football field, in the woods around the lakes, and elsewhere on campus. Such actions violate Catholic doctrine, which requires treating cremated remains with the same reverence as a full body. Ashes are supposed to be buried or inurned in a niche.…

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The Admissions Balancing Act

By Ed Cohen

For a high-school student making the rounds of potential colleges, the treatment doesn’t get much more royal than this:

A seven-day, all-expenses-paid trip to campus during the summer. Tickets to a professional production of Shakespeare one night, a pizza party the next, a banquet the night after that. A guided tour of the football stadium, a bowling outing. Meetings and discussions with officers and distinguished professors. Advice on career choices and financial aid, even pointers on how to write a winning personal statement to go with your college application.…

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Ticket Office Cracks Down on Reselling

By Ed Cohen

So you think you’re going to make a killing selling your tickets to this year’s home game against Florida State on e-Bay.

Beware.

Your buyer might be the Notre Dame ticket office. And if you get caught reselling tickets above face value you’ll lose your ticket-ordering privileges for at least two years. If it’s season tickets you’re scalping, you’ll be barred from ordering tickets for at least five years.…

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Alumni swell band ranks beyond 1,000

By Ed Cohen

The Band of the Fighting Irish normally numbers about 360, but at halftime at the Stanford game October 5, 2002, more than a thousand marching Irish covered the turf.

The extra instrumentalists and drum majors were band alumni who had come from as far away as Hawaii and London to be part of the largest band reunion ever.…

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The Transportation Wiz

By Ed Cohen

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As commissioner of public transportation for London, Bob Kiley ‘57 sometimes sounds like a man playing Monopoly.

“If we can get control over the commuter [rail] services, that will be a big step forward,” he says to a visitor to his office, as if already holding the deeds cards for the Reading, Pennsylvania and B&O railroads with only the Short Line eluding his grasp.…

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Bush-Kerry: The student vote

By Ed Cohen

A random sample poll of 273 students conducted by two political science majors three weeks before Election Day found 48 percent planned to vote for President Bush and 44 percent for John Kerry. The rest either favored another candidate or were unsure.

In a mock election held in the LaFortune Student Center a week before the election, 570 undergraduates and graduate students divided their vote this way between the two major candidates: 47.5 percent for Bush, 46.8 percent for Kerry. Bush won among freshmen and sophomores, Kerry among seniors and grad students. They more or less split the juniors.…

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Irish tongue becoming talk of campus

By Ed Cohen

At the home of the Fighting Irish, increasing numbers of students want to learn to speak Irish, even though only a tiny portion of the people in Ireland do.

Demand for Irish language courses has been strong since the establishment of the Keough Institute for Irish Studies in 1992. Last fall 67 undergraduates were enrolled in Irish language courses. The total was expected to top 80 this spring.…

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Seen and Heard

By Ed Cohen

_Live! With Regis and Kelly_ was live from Notre Dame on October 24. Regis '53 was here, but Kelly Ripa co-hosted from the show's regular studio headquarters in New York City. The day before the broadcast Regis performed a concert to benefit South Bend's Center for the Homeless. Tickets weren't cheap—$30 for the general public and $100 for preferred seating—but the show sold out the 900-plus-seat concert hall of the new Marie P. DeBartolo Center for the Performing Arts. That raised nearly $80,000 for the homeless center, according to the center's director. Regis sang selections from his new CD of standards, _When You're Smiling,_ backed by a 22-piece pick-up orchestra consisting of 14 Notre Dame students and eight local professionals. . . . . The Mendoza…

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Boys' Nights In

By Ed Cohen

Seated on a couch in the room of his dorm’s assistant rector, Keenan Hall sophomore John McDermott makes an observation that, taken out of context, might be disturbing. “Definitely the most satisfying kill,” he says, “is when you walk up behind someone and hit them in the back of the head.”

The business major, known as J-Mac around the dorm, announces this without taking his eyes from the 27-inch television opposite the couch or stilling his thumbs on the video game controller he clutches with both hands. Next to him, eyes and thumbs identically occupied, sits the assistant rector, Justin Kay, a third-year law student.…

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Seen and Heard: web extra

By Ed Cohen

Summer-long voting at the official Notre Dame athletics website, www.und.com, yielded a 25-player All-Century Basketball Team to commemorate the men's program's 100th season. One of the most striking details about the players elected is how much less scoring there used to be. The legendary Moose Krause led the Irish in 1931-32 with an average of 7.7 points per game. The only current player to make the All-Century team was point guard Chris Thomas. . . . As was the case last yea…

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ND 13th best in new study

By Ed Cohen

Notre Dame is 18th in the latest U.S. News & World Report college rankings but 13th using a new rating system developed by four East Coast scholars.

The alternative system relies on what its developers call “revealed preference ranking,” that entails asking individual students which colleges they prefer, one versus another. The U.S. News

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Domers at the helm

By Ed Cohen

During the weekend of last season's home football game against Boston College, Father Malloy hosted a reception for 17 Notre Dame alumni who are presidents of other colleges and universities. A total of 28 Domers currently head institutions of higher learning. Here they are in order of the year they were appointed:

Peter Sampo '60, '68Ph.D., Thomas More College (Merrimack, N.H.), appointed 1978…

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(Middle) name these Domers

By Ed Cohen

Match these members of the extended Notre Dame family with their middle names. …

1. Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, CSC, '39

2. Rev. Edward "Monk" Malloy, CSC, '63, '67M.A., '69M.Th.

3. Phil Donahue '57

4. Regis Philbin '53

5. Tyrone (is actually his middle name, what's his first?) Willingham

6. Muffet McGraw

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Checkback: The ACE program judgment

By Ed Cohen

What’s the status of the judgment that declared government financial support of the Alliance for Catholic Education program unconstitutional on the grounds of separation of state and religion?

At the end of August the federal district court judge who ruled against the program entered a stay of her own ruling while AmeriCorps and ACE

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A Brief History of Gibraltar

By Ed Cohen

Thanks to the logo of the Prudential Insurance Company (“Get a Piece of the Rock.”) many Americans imagine Gibraltar to be an island. It isn’t.

It’s the tip of a narrow peninsula on which stands the famous 1,400-foot-high chunk of Jurassic limestone, symbol of strength and stability. Bare on one side but largely covered with wild olive trees, petal cactus and other vegetation everywhere else, the Rock of Gibraltar is believed to have been formed by the collision of the Eurasian and African tectonic plates some 55 million years ago.…

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Monkeys on the Rock

By Ed Cohen

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According to legend, if the ravens ever disappear from the Tower of London both the tower and the British kingdom will crumble. And so, at the venerable stone compound in the center of London one of the colorful Yeoman Warders or Beefeaters (familiar to drinkers of the gin brand of the same name) is appointed Ravenmaster. It’s his job to feed and care for a flock of at least six of the traditionally ill-boding black birds so they always feel welcome.…

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A taste of poverty

By Ed Cohen

Students sat on the floor of the South Dining Hall drinking water and eating rice with no utensils.

They weren’t being punished. They were volunteers selected to eat as the world’s poor eat at an awareness-raising Hunger Banquet last fall.

Exactly 200 students, faculty and staff participated in the program, which involved each person being handed one of three colored cards that determined their place in the world’s pecking order for the meal. Fifty-five percent received green cards, signifying the 55 percent of the world’s people whose diet is limited mainly to rice and water.…

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ND-Saint Mary's marriages dwindling

By Ed Cohen

Coeducation at Notre Dame has lessened the cross-highway marital pairings of Saint Mary’s and ND students.

An analysis by Paul Perl ‘00Ph.D. shows that the percentage of women in each Saint Mary’s graduating class marrying Notre Dame graduates rose fairly steadily from 1950 until around 1972, the advent of coeducation. At that point, more than 1 in 4 Saint Mary’s graduates were taking their vows with Notre Dame men.…

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Toward a College Town with Care

By Ed Cohen

For much of its history Notre Dame kept its students cloistered.

When Father William Corby, CSC, first was president, 1866-72, students were forbidden from leaving the grounds without the permission of the president, vice president or prefect of discipline. In the 1920s students weren’t allowed to drive automobiles, and priests patrolled sections of downtown that were ruled off-limits.…

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You tell 'em, sister

By Ed Cohen

A 75-year-old Holy Cross nun, Sister Patricia Jean Garver, stole the show at the first football luncheon of the season when she related the advice she’d given the team at practice a few days before.

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Tails of rector assistants

By Ed Cohen

Honey was in Stanford, Harley in Pasquerilla West, Kitty in Badin, and Charlie in Walsh. The four were all new residents of their residence halls during the 1999-2000 school year

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A Figure of Speech

By Ed Cohen

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Ask Hubert J. “Hub” Schlafly ‘41 how the first TelePrompTer worked and he’ll say, “Barely.”

He should know. He built it. Out of a suitcase. Schlafly was working as director of television research for Twentieth Century Fox in the early 1950s when an actor named Fred Barton walked into the New York office of one of Schlafly’s colleagues at Fox, Irving Berlin Kahn, nephew of the famous songwriter. Barton, who was appearing on Broadway with Henry Fonda at the time in Mister Roberts

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Busted Bar Bites Back

By Ed Cohen

It’s been happening every year lately: Word spreads among students that a particular bar is easy to get into if you’re under the legal drinking age (21). The bar is raided. Law enforcement personnel discover scores of underage students inside holding fake IDs. The bar is forced to close or give up its liquor license as punishment. Another massive raid happened at a bar near campus in January, except this time the bar is fighting back—against students. A raid at The Boat Club on North Hill Street in South Bend found more than 200 minors inside, most of them Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students. In cases involving so many violations, the Indiana Alcohol and Tobacco Commission typically orders the bar’s owner to surrender the liquor license or sell the business. While waiting to see if the same fate awaits The Boat Club, however, the company that operates the bar, Millennium Club Inc., is suing the cited minors in small-claims court. The lawsuits argue that the minors are to blame for the business’s demise because they misrepresented themselves and should therefore be compelled to compensate the owner. The suits ask for $3,000 in damages from each student. A University official familiar with the case said he hadn’t heard of this tactic being tried in connection with a local bar bust before. The argument has apparently been made in cases elsewhere, however, with the courts generally not buying it. Were the courts to agree with the bar’s owner, the possibility future legal action might discourage underage students from trying to get into bars using fake IDs. But it could also act as an insurance policy for unscrupulous bar owners and become an incentive to allow underage drinking. According to Ed Sullivan, a local attorney retained by 40 Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students, hearing dates on the lawsuits have been set for August. But these probably won’t go forward because the Indiana Alcohol and Tobacco Commission is not expected to have resolved its case against the bar owner by then. The court isn’t likely to listen to arguments for damages until the bar can show what damages it has suffered. A phone call to the attorney representing the bar’s owner seeking comment was not returned. In a separate matter, in late April law enforcement officers raided The Library Irish Pub on East Wayne Street in downtown South Bend and issued citations to dozens more patrons for underage drinking and possession of fake IDs. In October 2000, they raided the same address, when it was known as Finnegan’s Irish Pub, and issued 147 citations. Because of the incident, the bar’s owners were forced to sell Finnegan’s and the bar was renamed.…

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Top Ten Team Names: Bookstore Basketball 2003

By Ed Cohen

10. You’ll Thank Us When It’s Over
9. Non-Nutritive Cereal Varnish
8. Cheese-Eating Surrender Monkeys
7. The Shroud of Torin
6. 5 Guys Who Know a Guy Who Pooped His Pants
5. Mounds Don’t
4. One Hawaiian & 4 Girls Who Like to Give Leis
3. We Arrgh Pirates
2. Jamaica Me Crazy
1. Stop that dog! It has my gum!…

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