Take Your Conscience to Work: ND Business School Has Always Taught Ethics

By Ed Cohen

“We become the choices that we make,” declared the Saint Thomas Aquinas quote projected onto a screen in the front left corner of the room. It was there for the start of the third meeting of adjunct professor Bonnie Fremgen’s Introduction to Business Ethics class. And if any of the sophomores in the lecture room suspected it meant she was expecting them to make tough choices that day, they were right.…

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Stomaching Chemotherapy Now Getting Easier

By Ed Cohen

Imagine you’re an oncologist. You spot one of your patients at the mall. You stroll over to say hello.

He throws up at the sight of you.

This actually happens, says Rudy Navari, M.D., ’66, associate dean of the College of Science, director of the Walther Cancer Research Center at Notre Dame and a practicing oncologist himself.…

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Overplayed party songs

By Ed Cohen

Notre Dame’s student magazine, Scholastic, recently listed what they consider to be the top 10 overplayed party songs.

10. “Piano Man,” Billy Joel.

9. “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun,” Cyndi Lauper

8. “Come on Eileen,” Dexy’s Midnight Runner

7. “You Shook Me All Night Long,” AC/DC

6. “That Was a Crazy Game of Poker,” O.A.R.…

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Are Juniper Road's Days Numbered?

By Ed Cohen

Juniper Road will no longer divide the campus if a road project proposed by University planners wins approval.

The University also is proposing a realignment of Edison Road with Angela Boulevard at the south end of campus and building a public park-like area to be called the Town Common where the campus meets the Northeast Neighborhood.…

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Seen and Heard

By Ed Cohen

In the week leading up to Valentine’s Day, the Gender Studies Program and the departments of English, anthropology and film, television, and theatre (FTT) joined with Gay and Lesbian Alumni/ae of the University of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s College (GALA- ND/SMC) to sponsor the first-ever Notre Dame Queer Film Festival. The four-day event included screenings of films with gay or lesbian characters and subject matter, appearances by writers and directors, panel discussions and a screen-writing workshop. Among those returning to campus for the festival were two alums: author Tom O’Neil ‘77 (Movie Awards; The Emmys; The Grammys_) and Director Don Roos ’77 (_The Opposite of Sex, Bounce

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Siegfried Ramblers win one for 'The Owner'

By Ed Cohen

In fall 2003, the Siegfried Hall Ramblers made it to the interhall football championship game, played in Notre Dame stadium, for the third consecutive season. Quite an accomplishment. But the achievement also held special poignance.

As junior Matt Mooney, The Observer’s sports wire editor and a Siegfried resident, explained in the student newspaper, all season long the Ramblers wore the initials RHS

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How successful was the ticket office in cracking down on football ticket reselling?

By Ed Cohen

As promised, the ticket office monitored websites where Notre Dame football tickets were being offered for sale without authorization in the 2003 season. And in cases where the original purchasers could be identified from row and seat numbers, the purchasers were held accountable for their misdeeds.

The office says it caught 86 season ticket holders and as punishment revoked their right to purchase tickets for a period of between two and five years depending on how many game tickets the person was offering for resale. The office confiscated a total of more than 1,300 tickets that were either being offered for sale online or scalped on campus.…

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How did Notre Dame's hurling team do in its first year?

By Ed Cohen

It’s a hurling club, not a team, so it didn’t win or lose any games.

In its first year as an officially recognized instructional club — supposedly the first university hurling club in the United States — the student organization mostly raised money to buy equipment and worked to publicize the sport and the club by holding coaching clinics. The club has about 20 members.…

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How's the endowment looking after a year in which the stock market recovered?

By Ed Cohen

2003 was a good year for the stock market and, not surprisingly, for Notre Dame’s investments as well.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index rose 28.7 percent for the calendar year while Notre Dame’s diversified pool of endowment and other invested capital returned just under 25 percent. (The U.S. equities portion of Notre Dame’s investments rose 38.6 percent for the year while its international equities were up 39.4 percent.)…

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Core Course: A Death in the Curriculum

By Ed Cohen

Hell, as depicted in Dante Alighieri’s epic poem the Inferno, is a multilevel maze-like place. It’s not easily navigated without expert direction. Which is probably why Dante has a guide, the Roman poet Virgil, conduct him through the underworld.

In a similar way, the 19 sophomores enrolled in Section 22 of the College of Arts and Letters Core course this past winter didn’t have to glean the dense layers of meaning in the landmark Italian work alone. Their guide: a woman with a calm, knowing demeanor and a Ph.D. in American literature.…

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Core: A Death in the Curriculum, page 2

By Ed Cohen

Previous page Phillip R. Sloan is chair of the Program of Liberal Studies, a traditional great-books program that has been offered as a major at Notre Dame for more than half a century. He also chaired a 1996-97 committee of the Arts and Letters College Council that studied possible revisions to the Core course. He says attitudes like Norton's fail to recognize the distinction between informed scrutiny of texts, a worthy pursuit, and the broader aims of a general liberal education.

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What happened with that Native American tribe's lawsuit over Notre Dame property?

By Ed Cohen

Last December the Hannahville Indian Community, which lives in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, sued Notre Dame and the federal Interior Department, saying the community was cheated out of a tract of land on the Notre Dame campus near the modern-day WNDU television studios.

The Hannahville Indians are successors to the Potawatomi people who were living in Northern Indiana when Father Sorin arrived in 1842. They allege that the state of Indiana illegally transferred Potawatomi-owned land to Notre Dame in violation of treaties dating to the 1820s. The University says it acquired the land legally.…

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Security monitors gone from women's dorms

By Ed Cohen

The end of the school year brought an end to the jobs of the female security monitors in the women’s residence halls

A spokesman for campus Security/Police said that after reviewing the program internally and consulting outside professionals the department decided the monitors weren’t accomplishing the department’s mission of providing security to all resident students.…

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Seen and Heard web extra

By Ed Cohen

The theater department staged George Bernard Shaw's _Arms and the Man,_ about an anti-romantic love triangle, in Washington Hall in April. It marked the end of an era—the last academic production to be performed in the 123-year-old facility. Beginning this fall shows put on by the Department of Film, Television and Theatre will be staged in the Marie P. DeBartolo Center for the Performing Arts, nearing completion at the south end of campus. Washington Hall will be reserved for productions by student organizations and residence halls plus some performances by non-University groups. . . . A crew from…

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Genuine John Jenkins

By Ed Cohen

It was another cold winter morning, early and still dark. Helen Jenkins was driving her son John to high school swim team practice.

“Mom,” he told her, “I want to quit the team.”

“You can’t,” she responded. “You’re too good, and they need you.”

Her son never mentioned the desire again. The following year, as a senior, he became captain of the swim team at Creighton Preparatory School, an all-boys Jesuit high school in Omaha, Nebraska, and one of the top swimmers in the state.…

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A Look at the Jenkins Family

By Ed Cohen

jenfamily.jpg

The family of Harry and Helen Jenkins of Omaha, Nebraska, is interesting for more than having produced the future president of Notre Dame, Father John Jenkins, CSC. Some details:

- 12 children (six sons, six daughters)

- 38 grandchildren

- Younger sister Anne is married to well-known travel writer and PBS

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Seen and Heard

By Ed Cohen

Notre Dame's libraries are facing a budget crisis that has forced them to cancel more than 1,500 electronic journal subscriptions and discontinue the print versions of another 1,000 journals. The problem is complicated but involves publishers of the journals knowing they have a captive audience and continuing to raise subscription rates faster than inflation. Were the problem not addressed, the new faculty-staff newspaper _ND Works_ reports, the University's expenditures on periodicals would double every seven years. . . . Law Professor Jimmy Gurulé…

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Students urge ND to say 'gracias, no' to Taco Bell

By Ed Cohen

Organizers of a protest estimated that 145 students went on hunger strikes spring semester to call on Notre Dame to stop doing business with Taco Bell.

The students, mostly members of the Progressive Student Alliance, were supporting a national boycott called by a farm workers group, the Coalition of Immokalee Workers. The coalition says Taco Bell’s tomato suppliers pay unfair wages to migrant workers in Florida. It wants the restaurant chain to pressure the suppliers to pay a living wage.…

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What's the latest on the University's proposed closing of Juniper Road?

By Ed Cohen

On June 8, 2004, the Saint Joseph County Council unanimously approved the University’s plan to close Juniper at Douglas Road. Traffic will be rerouted onto a new road just west of Ivy Road on the east side of campus. The road will be paid for by Notre Dame and will run mostly through University property. The plan also calls for a realignment of Edison Road south of campus.

Juniper won’t close until the new roadway is completed and approved by county engineers. That isn’t likely to happen before 2006.…

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Did the University decide to cap enrollment in the business college?

By Ed Cohen

Did the University decide to cap enrollment in the business college?

Last year a report from the Provost’s Office to University trustees showed that almost one out of every three members of the class of 2003 earned a business degree. That was up from about one in four 10 years ago and about one in five 25 years ago. The average at the other national universities ranked in the top 20 by U.S. News & World Report

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Resolving family differences

By Ed Cohen

gayshirts.jpg

Visitors to campus March 18, 2004, would have had a hard time believing Notre Dame has a reputation for being unwelcoming to gay people. Hundreds of students and employees that day could be seen wearing bright orange T-shirts reading “Gay? Fine by Me.”

An unofficial student group called the Gay-Straight Alliance said it sold about 1,600 of the shirts and encouraged people to wear them March 18 and thereafter as a sign of solidarity between gay and straight members of the campus community. The event was modeled on a concept born at Duke University. A second unity day was held April 21.…

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Notre Dame's Point Person

By Ed Cohen

The name in the directory is Sister Mary Louise Gude, CSC, (pronounced "goody") but students and colleagues alike call her "ML." She has lived in student residence halls for 21 years and joined the Office of Student Affairs in 1998—the same year, she recalls, "that the Progressive Student Alliance was campaigning for sexual orientation to be included in the University's nondiscrimination clause." In addition to other duties, ML is Notre Dame's central liaison with homosexual students and is chairperson of the University's Standing Committee for Gay and Lesbian Student Needs. Near the end of this school year she sat to talk:

ND Magazine:

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Checkback: Taco Bell

By Ed Cohen

Did the University decide to sever its ties with Taco Bell, as requested by a student group backing a national boycott?

Yes.

Last spring members of the Progressive Student Alliance staged hunger strikes and organized other efforts aimed at convincing the University not to renew a sponsorship agreement with local Taco Bell restaurants.…

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Checkback: Assault lawsuit

By Ed Cohen

What happened with the lawsuit filed against the University by the parents of a student who accused four football players of rape?

In June a Saint Joseph County Superior Court judge dismissed the portion of the lawsuit against Notre Dame.

The 22-year-old woman and her parents filed the suit in April seeking an unspecified amount of damages from the University and from four former Notre Dame football players whom she said raped her at the home of one of the players in 2002.…

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One lake or two?

By Ed Cohen

People who know Notre Dame’s full name is Notre Dame du Lac, know the layout of campus, and know a little French are often perplexed as to why the University’s name translates to “Our Lady of the Lake.” After all there are two lakes.

Many a smug Domer will explain that there used to be one lake. They’ll tell you that sometime in the 19th century the State of Indiana decided to confiscate all lakes larger than a certain size. To keep from losing one of Notre Dame’s lakes to secular authority, Father Sorin had the brothers fill in a shallow area between the lakes, turning Our Lady’s one big, potentially public lake into two smaller private ones.…

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Bridget's obliterated

By Ed Cohen

The bar near campus that became synonymous with underage drinking before it became a coffee shop has now become . . . a vacant lot.

The University purchased the former Molly McGuire’s Coffee House after it closed last summer and demolished it earlier this year. Also torn down was its neighbor across Eddy Street, the former offices of Shilts Graves & Associates Inc., an engineering firm. The University purchased that property in 2002.…

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Designing Irish take aim at purses, countertops, landfills

By Ed Cohen

The world is looking to Notre Dame students for coins, waste baskets and maybe even the next great washing machine.

Earlier this year, an art design student took first place in a national competition with his idea for a self-bagging waste-basket system. The United States Mint selected a senior majoring in marketing and art to help design future coins. And Electrolux, the world’s largest household appliance maker, picked Notre Dame’s Department of Art, Art History and Design to represent the United States in an international industrial design competition.…

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Custodian joins university immortals on ND Wall of Honor

By Ed Cohen

The Wall of Honor in the ground floor hallway of the Main Building celebrates such people as Father Sorin, Father Hesburgh, Knute Rockne. And now it honors the building’s former janitor.

Earlier this year, the names and likenesses of three more individuals were added to the wall: legendary band director Joseph Casasanta ‘23, who wrote the alma mater and “Hike Notre Dame” and other football songs; Helen H. Hosinski, secretary to Hesburgh from 1943 to 1990; and Curry Montague, principal custodian of the Main Building from 1970 to 2000.…

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Seen and Heard

By Ed Cohen

The Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies started fall semester without its star faculty recruit, a Muslim scholar named by _Time_ magazine as one of the most influential people in the world. In August, the State Department, acting on a request from the Department of Homeland Security, revoked the work visa of Tariq Ramadan, a Swiss citizen. No reason was given to Ramadan of the Kroc Institute. But various federal agency spokespeople quoted by news organizations said the reversal was made under a provision of the USA Patriot Act and related to federal law provisions that apply to foreigners who have used a "position of prominence within any country to endorse or espouse terrorist activity." Ramadan is a widely known scholar and considered a moderate by many in the Muslim world, but some Jewish groups have called him anti-Semitic, and there have been unsubstantiated accusations connecting him to terrorist groups. In a statement issued in late August, the University said it knew of no reason for the problem and that it was hopeful that the State Department would reconsider. . . . The Notre Dame Concert Band…

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