Experimental in Nature

By Jason Kelly '95

Notre Dame’s Harper Cancer Research Institute is trying a different strategy in the fight against the disease: bringing scientists from diverse fields onto a single team.

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What I’m Reading: The Betrayal, Charles Fountain

By Jason Kelly '95

“Say it ain’t so.” And maybe that reported exchange between a young boy and Chicago White Sox player Shoeless Joe Jackson, among the players accused of conspiring with gamblers to lose the 1919 World Series, ain’t accurate. Evidence suggests, Charles Fountain writes in his new book, The Betrayal: The 1919 World Series and the Birth of Modern Baseball, that a reporter “made it up.”

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The outlook for global futures

By Jason Kelly '95

The scale of predicted damage from climate change, with economic fallout estimated to reach hundreds of trillions of dollars, will require an environmental bailout in which human investment must be total.

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The Shaky Future of College Athletics

By Jason Kelly '95

Litigation “stacked up like planes at LaGuardia” threatens to change the relationship between athlete and university that has always defined college sports, but Jack Swarbrick ’76 sounded pretty serene about the whole thing.

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Milk River

By Jason Kelly '95

One day, while surveying a patch of his family’s ranch along the Milk River, David Aageson felt something. Something holy. Like he was on sacred ground.

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What I'm Reading: The Secret Scripture, Sebastian Barry

By Jason Kelly '95

Before I finished it, I was indiscriminately recommending The Secret Scripture, Sebastian Barry’s entrancing 2008 novel that alternates between a 100-year-old woman’s clandestine reminiscence, hidden beneath the floorboards of her asylum bedroom, and the journal of her facility’s chief psychiatrist.

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A Home-Away for the University's Main Game

By Jason Kelly '95

“Connemara,” Oscar Wilde said, “is a savage beauty.” A wild mountainous protrusion into the Atlantic along the west coast of Ireland, where sheep huddle behind stone walls to escape blowing rain even in summer, the landscape still fits his description.

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Out of the Office: Universal questions

By Jason Kelly '95

Last year Guy Consolmagno, S.J., received the Carl Sagan Medal from the American Astronomical Society for outstanding communication of planetary science to the general public. A gray-bearded, amiable presence in front of about 150 people last week at Notre Dame, he hopped easily across cobblestones of conversation: meteorite hunting in Antarctica, multiverses, the warming planet’s rising seas, insights from science fiction, and the confusion of communication between science and religion.

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Screening the Easter Rising

By Jason Kelly '95

An 80-minute feature version of 1916: The Irish Rebellion will be screened in theaters and at global events, beginning with the March 16 world premiere in Dublin hosted by the Irish government. The U.S. premiere will be March 21 at the Gene Siskel Film Center in Chicago, with screenings to follow in Atlanta and Washington, D.C. Various PBS

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The Money Games

By Jason Kelly '95

Professional sports have become vast global industries, billion-dollar enterprises and powerful cultural forces. Where does this leave their fans?

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A technological knockout for head injuries?

By Jason Kelly '95

Obvious concussions are easy to identify. You don’t have to be a doctor to recognize the symptoms: confusion, memory loss, nausea, balance problems. It’s like watching one of those viral videos of someone staggering through a field sobriety test. You just know. The problem is that athletes who suffer head injuries don’t always show such signs.

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Far afield: A Prescription for Lance Armstrong

By Jason Kelly '95

Lance Armstrong should be sorry, particularly to the people he slandered to protect his good name and to the millions of credulous true believers who took him at his defiant word. As for the doping, in and of itself? I’m one of the few people on earth who doesn’t think Armstrong needs to apologize for that.

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Far afield: Hei5man

By Jason Kelly '95

Manti Te’o is the main character in a bedtime story that helps everyone involved with college football sleep at night. He’s a great player, he seems like one of the all-time good guys and he endured traumatic personal losses this season with inspiring grace. But that doesn’t make him a Heisman Trophy candidate.

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A coaching legend’s no-how

By Jason Kelly '95

Jason Kelly

John Gagliardi left his office door open while he studied game film, an unheard of security breach compared to the paranoid lockdown of most college football programs. It’s true that Gagliardi, the head coach at Division III Saint John’s University for 60 years until his retirement on Monday, operated outside the scope of the sport’s most intense surveillance. Still.

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A Road Runner rerun at last?

By Jason Kelly '95

After one of the more recent indignities heaped on the Notre Dame football team — Michigan State’s heart attack inducing fake field goal, I think — a faculty member vented on Facebook: “OK, joke’s over. Could whoever turned us into the Wile E. Coyote of college football these past years, please turn us back into the Road Runner?”

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Far afield: What do we expect?

By Jason Kelly '95

Jason Kelly

Urban Meyer violated one of the terms of his Ohio State coaching contract on the first day the football team gathered this summer. Not his contract with the university, the six-year deal worth $26-plus million. Meyer breached the agreement he made with his family.

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Far afield: JoePa’s hollow pedestal

By Jason Kelly '95

Jason Kelly

It’s a familiar pattern repeated in similar circumstances far beyond Penn State, far beyond sports. Police, soldiers, priests, politicians—human beings—we all align ourselves with institutions that come to define us. To acknowledge flaws in them feels like a betrayal worse than the original misconduct.

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Far afield: Elmer’s glue

By Jason Kelly '95

When the Four Horsemen, the seven mules and Knute Rockne’s other farm animals finished grazing, only Elmer Layden hung around the Notre Dame dining hall to bus tables. “He wasn’t asked to help, and he didn’t expect thanks,” wrote Red Smith, who knew because he was the student waiter on duty. “He just was, and is, that kind of gentleman.”

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