The wide-eyed ID flaw

By John Monczunski

Unless you work in a high security environment, you may never have had your eye scanned to confirm your identity. But in recent years the eye has been increasingly harnessed as a biometric for identification purposes.

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Smart drugs target disease

By John Monczunski

It’s no surprise then that one of the main quests in pharmaceutical chemistry is to develop silver-bullet medicines, smart drugs that specifically target diseased cells while leaving healthy ones alone.

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‘Old’ gets older

By John Monczunski

American lifespan has dramatically increased over the course of the 20th century. A recent student study of longevity among Holy Cross Sisters at Saint Mary’s College confirms just how much.

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The great outdoors graduation

By John Monczunski

Notre Dame’s 165th commencement went back to the future on May 16. For the first time since 1959, the University’s graduation exercises were held outdoors in Notre Dame Stadium.

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Domers inthe news

By John Monczunski

Astronaut Michael T. Good ’84, ’86M.S. was a crew member on the Space Shuttle Atlantis’ final mission in May. Good served as flight engineer and performed two spacewalks during the 12-day mission, which attached a Russian-made module to the International Space Staton. A year ago, the Ohio native flew on a shuttle mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. . . . Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice ’75M.A.

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Saving the medicine of last resort

By John Monczunski

Unless you’ve been at death’s door with a compromised immune system or happen to be a medicinal chemist, chances are you’ve never heard of a “carbapenem” antibiotic. But should you have the misfortune to become gravely ill with an infection and no other medicine works, you’ll be glad to come in contact with one.

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Communities opposed to gay marriage

By John Monczunski

Opposition to same-sex marriage appears to be especially strong in communities in which traditional gender roles and family structure are dominant and, at the same time, a high level of population mobility, low homeownership rates and high crime rates are prevalent.

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Handling 10 million years of danger

By John Monczunski

A recent study by Notre Dame scientists might mean rethinking how radioactive waste is stored and handled. Common scientific wisdom has said that all radioactive elements behave in a similar fashion when it comes to their physical and chemical properties.

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ADHD misdiagnosed?

By John Monczunski

Within the past 25 years the United States has suffered an unprecedented epidemic of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among the nation’s children. From the late 1980s to the early 2000s the rate of diagnosis soared 500 percent. What is driving this surge?

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A funny thing happened ...

By John Monczunski

Recently, three very funny Notre Dame alumni, John Garrett ’98, Eric Hunter ’88 and Jim Brogan ’70, aka “The Laughing Irish,” came back to campus to perform their stand-up comedy acts at Legends.

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Haitian memories

By John Monczunski

Three members of Notre Dame’s Haiti Program, a public health effort to eliminate the disease lymphatic filariasis, were attending a meeting in Port-au-Prince when the earthquake struck on January 12.

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Something funny bites again

By John Monczunski

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It was a noontime ritual virtually everyone engaged in during the late 1970s and early ’80s at Notre Dame. Whether you were a student, professor, administrator or janitor, it’s likely the first thing you did at lunch each weekday was flip through The Observer

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Jet lag gene

By John Monczunski

Most people feel exhausted and disoriented after they travel quickly across several time zones. Not a problem for Giles Duffield’s special mice.

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Water on the moon

By John Monczunski

They say you can’t squeeze water from a stone, but some rocks securely locked away in a safe in Clive Neal’s office prove otherwise.

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Domers in the news

By John Monczunski

Astronaut Kevin Ford ’82 piloted the space shuttle Discovery in August on a mission to bring supplies to the International Space Station. Among the items delivered were a freezer, storage racks, a new sleeping compartment and the Colbert Treadmill, named after TV comedian Stephen Colbert. . . . Martha Larzelere Campbell ’73M.A

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I wanted to be part of that

By John Monczunski

Amber Herkey recalls with awe meeting Father Hesburgh the first time she came to campus as a high school participant in Notre Dame’s summer African-American Catholic Leadership Seminar.

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Twittering Your Life Away

By John Monczunski

I have the dubious distinction of ramming my car (actually gently bumping might be more accurate, since I was traveling about 3 mph at the time) into a telephone pole as I cleverly attempted to change the ring tone on my cell phone. I do not recommend this.

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Domers in the News

By John Monczunski

While President Barack Obama gave the ND commencement address on May 17, astronaut Michael T. Good ’84, ’86M.S. was high above, orbiting the Earth as a crew member of the space shuttle Atlantis. The Air Force colonel, who took a Notre Dame pennant with him on the shuttle mission, was part of a team sent to repair the Hubble space telescope. In a complicated spacewalk, Good and his partner replaced several gyroscopes, making it possible for the telescope to precisely point at distant space objects. . . . Astronaut Kevin A. Ford ’82

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