Editor's Note: Growing into the light

By Kerry Temple ’74

With the coming of autumn my wife moved two big pots of outdoor plants into a south-facing, upstairs window. The pretty annuals didn’t last long. But each pot also contained asparagus ferns, spindly, lovely and green. They have flourished, despite being indoors, climbing the window panes, stretching up into sunlight, their fingery lacework now almost 4 feet tall.…

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Father Hesburgh and Notre Dame Magazine

By Kerry Temple ’74

When someone as great as Father Ted Hesburgh, CSC, lives deep into his 97th year, you begin to wonder if he might just live forever. So news of his death today has come as a sudden blow, a punch to the stomach, even though reports had him in severe decline over the past few weeks.

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Out of the office: Getting there

By Kerry Temple ’74

Even at semester’s end, after three months swimming in these rivers, I make my way — always against the current, up the down staircase, entering as others exit — feeling like a foreigner unschooled in the ways of flocks and herds.

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Out of the office: A&L career night

By Kerry Temple ’74

They have come in the night, in the dark, crunching through snow, faces strafed by the wind. And now they sit in a LaFortune meeting room, long tables arranged in a big square, to hear a panel of people speak and answer questions, give pep talks and offer advice.

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Having lunch with . . . Don Bishop

By Kerry Temple ’74

Deciding who gets in and who doesn’t attracts a passionate band of critics, gripers and second-guessers. Bishop and his staff know quite well their decisions break hearts, collapse dreams and vault young people into life-altering directions.

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Soundings: A poem of death and life

By Kerry Temple ’74

“The paper I have enclosed was composed at Notre Dame by Michael Ury when he was on retreat in 1986. Michael died this past year of cancer. Naturally his family was devastated. His mother is in a nursing home that I visit. She asked me if I could see that this was published. I thought of no better place than ND. Our Lady would want to bring comfort to a loving mother.”

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We are all of us

By Kerry Temple ’74

This issue started with an idea that’s been around awhile — the concept of the “Notre Dame man.” Three decades ago the editors here talked about doing a story that answered the question, “What do we mean by the ‘Notre Dame man?’”

At one time the phrase meant something significant. It was an ideal. I still get a handful of letters each year from alums who have written about a father who has died; they talk about their father’s strong but quiet life and all the good he did. “He was a true Notre Dame man,” they conclude. In the past year or two I have written obituaries of colleagues here, and each time I have thought those three words the best summation of their lives.…

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Crossroad Project keys construction

By Kerry Temple ’74

While the campus expansion in recent times may have caused a mild case of disorientation in those returning for an occasional football game or reunion, the next wave of construction projects may prove even more dizzying to those who stay away too long.

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Soundings: Deceptive winter

By Kerry Temple ’74

A talk radio commentator was ranting the other day about the global warming “hoax.” He said this winter was evidence that the planet isn’t getting any hotter and that climate change talk is mere propaganda.

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Soundings: All is not fair

By Kerry Temple ’74

Basketball is a messy game. It is even messier for 9-year-olds who can’t help but double-dribble, who swarm to the ball like moths to a porch-light and who take too many steps when none is allowed.

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Soundings: Olympic ideals

By Kerry Temple ’74

I grew up under the cloud of Cold War hostility. The Olympics became a staging ground for international rivalries, with U.S. athletes doing their patriotic best to beat Soviet bloc countries and show which political and economic system was superior. Athletes, whether they liked it or not, bore the weight of global power posturing.

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