Can you help?

By Kerry Temple ’74

There are troublemakers among us. They step out of line, go against the grain. They challenge the status quo, do not accept the way things are. They are dissidents, discontents, even malcontents. They do not sit at the back of the bus. They can be instigators, agitators, innovators. Rebels, radicals, revolutionaries, martyrs. They challenge the “group think.” They are a pain in the butt. They make us think. They sit in. They protest and demonstrate and perform outrageous acts for their cause, to get attention, to shake things up. They stare down a tank in the village square. They stand on the lawn of the president’s ranch until they get an explanation. They do not ask why it would be a crazy thing to do—they get in the car and go.…

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Editor's Note: Living globally

By Kerry Temple ’74

It’s always a gamble having too much of any subject in one issue of the magazine. You risk losing those readers who aren’t interested in that topic—especially this one, when readers are apt to tune out stories about the plight of Third World nations. Those countries are far away and practically irrelevant to us. We’ve heard about “the starving children” of Africa or India all our lives. We’ve seen so many images of drought, starvation and disease in Ethiopia, Somalia and Rwanda, Bangladesh, Darfur and Haiti to make us jaded, callous or hopelessly overwhelmed.…

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Hot August Night

By Kerry Temple ’74

So here you are, up on your feet, standing. You do not remember standing. You do not remember the moment you rose from your seat, rose with the thousands of others, clapping, singing, swept into the rhythmic wave of song and chant and arm-waving joy, the guitar-driven music washing over you, lyrics shouted into the nighttime sky. But here you are—with a full moon glowing softly in the hazy summer sky, out over the river, the trees and fields to the west, Indianapolis skyline to your back, sparkling like a giant, jeweled city—and it feels so very good to be here. Better than you thought it would. Better than you had imagined.…

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Red states, blue states, black and white

By Kerry Temple ’74

What’s to be done about the impact of 21st century immigration patterns on the American landscape? What can the United Nations do about keeping peace and averting disasters in today’s world? Why did a couple of Notre Dame professors seek the truth about Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction and how did they become international experts on the effect of sanctions in policing the world? What does Notre Dame’s Catholic character mean to those who work, study and teach here—even the University’s Islamic community?…

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Letter from campus: Happy 90th, Father Hesburgh

By Kerry Temple ’74

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One afternoon while we were working on this issue the time seemed right to visit Father Hesburgh. It’s only natural to think of the man who presided over the University for 35 years when you’re asking Notre Dame people to write about what they’re doing here. Hesburgh has spent a lifetime answering that question, and his response has been to combat racism, promote peace, serve presidents and popes, spread justice and determinedly push his school into the front rank of higher education. In doing this (and a whole lot more) Hesburgh became one of the nation’s most prominent leaders and an exemplary citizen of the world simply by performing—he will say time and again—his duties as a Catholic priest.…

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Whoa! What Am I Doing Here?

By Kerry Temple ’74

We’ve all had them—those panicky predicaments. You’re stuck and don’t want to be.

I call them “Help, Mister Wizard” moments. No one ever gets the literary allusion. No one seems to know what I mean when I punctuate some personal, cliffhanger narrative with, “It was, you know, one of those ‘Help, Mister Wizard’ moments.” Actually, it is not a literary allusion at all. It refers to a long-gone cartoon that was pretty obscure even in its heyday.…

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Come Holy Spirit

By Kerry Temple ’74

Life at Notre Dame is an invocation. It is a prayer, a petition, a benediction. It is a blessing of grace and community, lives devoted to a higher calling, a sense of the divine threading through the strands of human endeavor here. Notre Dame is a place where God is spoken—and not just as some enigmatic concept but as a real and living force, a participant in daily affairs. Notre Dame can be a sacrament of holy initiative, of sacred creativity, blessed learning and ancient wisdom. It has soul. The spirit is palpable. The expressions of faith are abundant and diverse, commonplace and rare.…

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The State of the University

By Kerry Temple ’74

My first job at Notre Dame was as a development writer for the Campaign for Notre Dame. I started on Halloween 1977. In early 1981, the books closed on this fund-raising effort, with $180 million raised toward the $130 million goal. It was a staggering sum to those of us in development in those days, and a stunning achievement we were all proud of. So I was surprised one day when two department heads came to my office and said, “Now that the campaign is over we have no need for a development writer.”…

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Paying the Price

By Kerry Temple ’74

Congratulations. You got in. Or your son or daughter got in—one of the 1,985 fortunate ones to enroll at Notre Dame from among the 14,430 applicants. That’s a huge accomplishment. Given the competition and the narrow gateway and the impressive profiles of those who made it and those who didn’t, the achievement is pretty awesome.…

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What One Man Started

By Kerry Temple ’74

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In August 1857, when the Very Reverend Basil-Antoine Marie Moreau made his one trip to Notre Dame, he was wracked by the kind of bipolar tussle that defined his life and dogged him all his days.

The man was a contrary vessel of charisma and violent temper, holiness and torment, humility and self-righteousness. He was a priest of vision, kindness, equanimity. He was also a priest of severity, zealotry, imperiousness. During his three-week stay at Notre Dame, amid the swells of great achievement and promise, were swirling—in America and in France—the countercurrents of his demise, the wrestling for power, money and authority that would prompt his displacement from the religious order he had established and lead him toward sainthood.…

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Some thoughts while waiting on the microwave

By Kerry Temple ’74

There are now 35 years’ worth of Notre Dame Magazines stacked on the shelves in the little room where I obsessively reheat my coffee. I often thumb through a back issue while waiting for the microwave to beep. Each edition is a time capsule that resurrects memories of people and stories, that reminds me of the misfires and triumphs, and (I hope) offers evidence of the magazine’s growing sophistication. Excursions into the past also underscore the continuity of this magazine’s place within the University community.…

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Going, going, gone: Campus' lost places

By Kerry Temple ’74

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A guy came in my office the other day. It was a football Friday afternoon, and he wanted to show his son the room in Grace Hall where he had lived in the 1970s. I was happy to accommodate the walk down memory lane.

I remembered going into Farley Hall, revisiting the familiar corridors and niches. Even spinning down the stairwell from fourth floor to first brought back a flood of memories—hurrying to class, catching up with the guys for dinner, running to play football on the fields by the library. The sound of the footfalls, the handrails and worn stone steps—the very details and smells of the place—carried me across time to those faraway years.…

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A Good Read

By Kerry Temple ’74

And then, before I knew it, carried by the words, I found myself with a group of people in the cold January desert night in southern Colorado, watching the moon.

The passage across time and space wasn’t immediate. It took more than a few paragraphs to get my head out of the papery clutter and psychic noise of my office. At the time I was immersed in the swirl of getting the autumn issue done, thinking about the portrayal of Jimmy Carter and the writer’s take on the thorny, hot-button Israeli-Palestinian affair. I had a couple of articles of my own to write (hadn’t started) and was thinking about that proposed piece on abortion and presidential politics. I faced a backlog of emails, a dispute needing finesse, a squabble needing a referee. I pondered what the magazine might do with Iraq, Iran, global warming. I could hear the echoes of barking readers, the wishes of family, the argument between my health and morning donut and, well, I was fretting over my lineup for the fantasy baseball finals.…

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Having coffee with Cornelius Eady: Authentic voice

By Kerry Temple ’74

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Cornelius Eady is a poet. One of his eight books, The Gathering of My Name, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in 1991. Another, Brutal Imagination, was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry in 2001. He and jazz composer Diedre Murray have collaborated on several works of musical theater, including Running Man

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Having coffee with Linda Przybyszewski: What to wear

By Kerry Temple ’74

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We had agreed to meet for coffee and talk fashion. I was wearing khaki chinos and a green plaid shirt—pretty much my daily uniform (though I don’t usually have toothpaste sprinkles on the front of my shirt as I do today). I don’t know what Linda Przybyszewski looks like (or how to pronounce her name), but I suspect she will be wearing something nice. I also suspect she may have made it herself (tipoff from a mutual friend) but know better than to ask (tipoff from my mother—years ago, the thinking being that your inquiry suggests the outfit must look suspiciously homemade).…

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Editor's note: What's Happening Here?

By Kerry Temple ’74

It hit me at Jim Wensits’ retirement dinner.

Jim is Carol Schaal’s husband — Carol ‘91M.A. being this magazine’s managing editor and a colleague of mine for 20 years. Jim was retiring from the South Bend Tribune after 41 years. During his career Jim had covered the police beat, politics and government. He had written a country music column for 14 years and had served as an editorial page writer and editor. It was Jim’s scrupulous reporting that helped lead to the arrest and conviction of a local sheriff who had been taking bribes from a South Bend madame.…

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Editor's Note: What's a person to do?

By Kerry Temple ’74

It’s always bothered me that we’ve never used recycled paper to produce the print issue of Notre Dame Magazine.

On our pages, many writers have expressed an appreciation for the environment, its beauty and its gifts. Some of these authors have gotten us to think seriously about the spirituality of the universe and a kind of theology of the natural world. I have a deep love of the land, too.…

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One Guy's Point of View

By Kerry Temple ’74

I don’t know what it was like to be one of the first women undergrads to enroll at Notre Dame. But I was a junior in 1972-73, so I know it was hard. They were oddities, and they were treated as such—stared at and scrutinized and asked for “the woman’s point of view” in class. They formed a small scouting party of aliens on a primitive, all-male planet. Most of us guys hardly knew how to talk to them—if we’d be so bold as to break ranks and actually venture into conversation with them (a leap into cross-gender social interaction almost always involving beer).…

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Marks in the Sand

By Kerry Temple ’74

I saw the tarantula first. I saw only the black, hairy legs groping toward my face as I opened my eyes from a nap in the desert. Light-blinded and startled, my head flat to the earth, I watched it creep menacingly closer. The deliberate movements of its legs were robotic, exploratory, wary. I dared not move. I felt the burn of the sunlamp sky and felt the perspiration rise from the pores of my bare skin. Then, a few inches from my face, the tarantula stopped, stood still and rigid for what seemed like an eternity.…

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Editor's Note: Good deeds

By Kerry Temple ’74

The phone calls, letters and e-mails come pretty regularly these days. They routinely bring good news; it is always a cordial interchange. But they do present a problem, and I find myself dodging, cringing and politely apologizing. They come from Catholic school administrators with young Notre Dame grads having profound effects on wayward youngsters. “You’ve got to do a story!” They come from social workers whose clients are touched deeply by Notre Dame students staffing soup kitchens and homes for unwed mothers. “You’ve got to do a story!” They come from alumni — people hammering and sawing with Habitat for Humanity, doctors performing life-changing surgeries on the least fortunate people in the world, friends telling of lives dedicated to society’s most forgotten. “You really should do a story!”…

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Going for story

By Kerry Temple ’74

One of the best things about journalism is the field trips. You get to travel to different corners of the world, meet new people, have interesting conversations, get a taste of places you wouldn’t normally go.

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The Cairn Builder

By Kerry Temple ’74

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The words were out of my mouth before I could stop them. “An English major?” I blurted out. “Why would you want to do that? What are you going to do, how would you get a job with a degree in English?” That’s when I stopped, because I heard my father’s voice echoing in my own, because I’d had this conversation already — 30 years ago, except that last time I was on the other side of the table, looking at my dad, trying to explain to him why I wanted to be an English

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Walking the Woods: An excerpt from _ Back to Earth: A Backpacker's Journey into Self and Soul_

By Kerry Temple ’74

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It really isn’t much, as parcels of nature go: an ordinary wedge of land, common in appearance. But it is to me a hallowed place. For eight years I ran my dog here; we didn’t miss a day. No matter how surly or mean the weather, we’d come to these woods tucked into the crescent bend of a slow, brown river. We would walk a loop, a meandering circle, with my dog racing ahead, galloping after groundhogs, sniffing out squirrels, treeing raccoons.…

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Those angry readers

By Kerry Temple ’74

“Dear Editor,” the note began, “after reading ‘Bush Country’ in which R. Bruce Dold spent several pages licking George Bush’s shoes, I have lost all respect for your magazine. Please cancel my subscription.”

“Please cancel my subscription,” said the second. “I cannot recall perusing such a steady diet of trivia in the face of the criminal behavior of our country in the slaughter of Iraq.”…

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The Impact of the Generations Campaign

By Kerry Temple ’74

Salvatore J. LaPilusa ‘41 came to South Bend from Bayonne, New Jersey, as a freshman in the fall of 1937. It was his first time away from home. His father, a bricklayer, had come to America in 1912; his mother, a seamstress, had come in 1914. Young Sal traveled alone by train to the Midwestern city, then took the trolley up the hill from downtown. “Seeing the dome,” he recalls, “made my heart pound faster.” He checked into freshman hall, roomed with a kid from Denver in a hothouse little cubicle with steel bunks and no chairs. Sal wanted to be a doctor. The tuition that year, he figured, was $25 per week — his father’s weekly pay. His two older sisters worked to help get Sal through school.…

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God Is Where You Find Him

By Kerry Temple ’74

It occurred to me, then, ripping along at 85 miles an hour, engulfed in the darkness of the night, that one thing I like best about driving is that you are nowhere and everywhere at once. Even though you are bound, to some degree, by geography and law and physics, these are not rigid constraints. Their power ebbs and flows with time, leaving you untethered and free, “passing through,” as they say, and therefore tied to no here

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A Magazine of Many Parts

By Kerry Temple ’74

The other day I was telling a friend about a person I admire. I summed it up by saying, “He is a man of many rooms.” My friend looked at me quizzically, and I tried to explain a concept that had come to me some years ago.

The idea emerged at a time I lived in a big three-story house and had kids to play with and dinners to cook and the occasional need to be alone. It seemed that different rooms required different roles and that filling those various roles enabled me to inhabit different parts of me.…

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